Question about Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Fault with connection lead to charge phone and will not charge on stand either

Plug lead to charge phone seems faulty and will not charge on stand loose connection

Posted by on

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 4 Answers

Buy a new one

Posted on Nov 27, 2013

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of.(from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones)
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

99 Honda Valkyrie Changed alternator , new battery on the bike took it out and it still not charging


Hi, David the voltage regulator is the #1 cause of faulty charging systems before testing any electrical component in the Charging System Circuit it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amps causing the battery to be faulty and must be replaced, especially "AGM" batteries.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Another Battery charging question
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
HONDA VALKYRIE RUNE NXR 1800 WORKSHOP SERVICE REPAIR MANUAL Download... $10 very cheap
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
http://www.valkyrieriders.com/ShopTalk/ValkMaintManAcrobatPDF.pdf
http://mybikemanuals.com/honda

Apr 09, 2017 | 1999 Honda F6 C Valkyrie

1 Answer

Why not charge or power up???


either faulty lead , charger or phone try charging from pc or laptop this will tell you where the fault is. try a different lead.

Feb 26, 2017 | Cell Phones

1 Answer

Wont star put new battery in


If it ISN'T cranking over ok ... and has a discharged battery..
Disconnect the leads from the rear of the alternator. A faulty alternator can discharge a battery within minutes. Charge the battery and leave the alternator disconnected. Try and start the car.

If - with a charged battery and alternator disconnected - the engine seems very slow to crank or makes a 'clicking' noise ... try cleaning the battery terminals - particularly where the black lead connects to the engine block/bodywork.

Check the leads -and terminals - for breakage/corrosion. A 'bad earth' or corroded/loose battery terminal can cause non-starting problems.

If all is ok and the car spins the engine but won't start, suspect a sensor fault.

Don't waste money on replacing part after part in the hope that the care will fire up. The best - and cheapest - option is to have an OBD - a hand held diagnostic check done. This will identify any error codes and tell you the cause .. i.e 'crankshaft sensor fault'.

May 04, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1992 yamaha vmax not charging


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System Circuit it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amps causing the battery to be faulty and must be replaced, especially "AGM" batteries.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.starvmax.com/kunena/12-general-vmax-discussion/132078-vmax-charging-problem
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Yamaha Vmax VMX17C 2009 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
Yamaha MAX VMX17YC Owner Manual

May 11, 2012 | Yamaha V-Max Motorcycles

1 Answer

My Phone will not switch on. I have charged my batterie


Try turning the phone on while it's still connected to the charging lead. If it works then you most likely have a faulty battery and will need to buy a new one.

If not, your phone is faulty. Diagnosing less obvious faults on dead mobile phones requires special skills and tools so the only option will be to take the phone to a repair shop.

Good luck, and please take a moment to rate my answer.

Sep 16, 2010 | LG Shine KE970 Cellular Phone

1 Answer

Honda 2004 Sabre will not charge the battery


Hi, Rhall20448 before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Why won my battery hold charge
Honda Shadow VT1100C Charging System Repair
Honda shadow vt1100 Owners Workshop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda VT1100C2 Owner Manual Page 3

Jul 27, 2010 | 2004 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

Batteries won't charge


Hi. Sounds like there is a faulty connection somewhere between the charger and the batteries. Are the batteries connected correctly. The charger uses the voltage level in the batteries to regulate itself. If there is a faulty connection, then the charge will not operate. Use a multi-meter to check if the batteries are connected correctly. There should be 24 to 26 volts across both batteries.
This fault can also be caused by a faulty charger socket. Check for any signs of melting or heat damage. There might also be a disconnected wire in the plug on the charger itself.Good luck. Neil.

May 29, 2010 | Drive Medical BLUE 3 Wheel Compact Mini...

1 Answer

Dualshock 3 battery is not charging


Have same issue. Contollers only 2 month old and stopped holding a charge. The controllers flash 'dead battery' when switched on, if I plug up the charge lead they flash to say charging, and after 10mins or so they stop flashing. But no charge in battery. both my controllers have been charged less than 10/15 times.
This fault seems to have come about after the latest system update?
I think you should contact Sony.

Nov 26, 2009 | Sony Dual Shock 3 Controller for...

1 Answer

Sony walkman phone faulty charger connection so can't charge


you need to take the phone to a mobile service center and have them service the charger port

Nov 30, 2008 | Sony Ericsson W200i Cellular Phone

1 Answer

Batteries won't charge while wired to truck


Hi, seems that your alternator diodes are faulty.
You can check this by disconnecting the radio & switching off all interior lights etc.
Then remove one battery lead.
Then get an amp meter and connect it between the battery & the removed lead.
If you get a reading the alternator is drawing current , hence faulty diodes.
The alternator will still charge the battery when the engine is going but then discharges when stopped.
Also check your batteries with a hydrometer by checking the battery acid in each cell as you could have a dodgey cell in them.

Nov 28, 2008 | 2003 Ford F250 Super Duty Crew Cab

Not finding what you are looking for?
Computers & Internet Logo

Related Topics:

200 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Computers & Internet Experts

Doctor PC
Doctor PC

Level 3 Expert

7733 Answers

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

David Payne
David Payne

Level 3 Expert

14161 Answers

Are you a Computer and Internet Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...