Question about Cameras

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When I take pictures at a low iso and fast shutter speed, two yellow lines roll slowly across the lcd screen, and they also show up in the pictures.

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  • Cameras Master
  • 6,702 Answers

Perhaps it could help if you gave more information, like brand, model, what iso and how much light to start with. Not being in the situation, not having the camera in hand, it takes a little more than what you tell us now, to be able to help you.

Posted on Nov 24, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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t00nz
  • 4738 Answers

SOURCE: lines across images

This sounds like it might be a defective CCD imager. If so, Canon should fix this for you for free, including free shipping both ways. This is regardless of your camera's warranty status. Please check the following two links for more info:

http://camerarepair.blogspot.com/2007/11/canon-digital-cameras-showing-black.html

http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=PgComSmModDisplayAct&fcategoryid=225&modelid=13390&keycode=2112&id=29819

Applicable cameras include:
A40, A60, A70, A75, A80, A85, A95, A300, A310, S1 IS, S60, S200, S230, S330, S400, S410, S500, SD100, SD110, IXUS V2/300/400/430/500, IXY Digital 200a/300a/400/450/500

Posted on Mar 18, 2008

t00nz
  • 4738 Answers

SOURCE: my pictures and the lcd

What model camera do you have? A few years ago a large number of defective Sony CCD's were installed in many cameras from several vendors. The CCD's eventually deteriorate to produce the effects that you're seeing. If your camera is a Canon, there's a very good chance that Canon will fix this for you for free, including free shipping both ways. This is regardless of your camera's warranty status. Please check the following two links for more info:
http://camerarepair.blogspot.com/2007/11/canon-digital-cameras-showing-black.html

http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=PgComSmModDisplayAct&fcategoryid=225&modelid=13390&keycode=2112&id=29819

Applicable cameras include:
A40, A60, A70, A75, A80, A85, A95, A300, A310, S1 IS, S60, S200, S230, S330, S400, S410, S500, SD100, SD110, IXUS V2/300/400/430/500, IXY Digital 200a/300a/400/450/500

Posted on Oct 19, 2008

welcomejee
  • 10594 Answers

SOURCE: view screen has purple lines across whole screen cant take a pic.

Hello,
It is bad ccd issue in Canon A95 camera and ccd imager needs to be replaced.

Canon will repair A95 free of cost as per announced scheme.

Click Canon CCD Advisory for details.

Good luck.

Posted on Dec 21, 2008

spotatohead
  • 95 Answers

SOURCE: i need to change settings for samsung L201

You can reset all settings to the original defaults by following the instructions on page 74 of the manual:
http://downloadcenter.samsung.com/content/UM/200810/20081006113527265_L200_English.pdf

Page 41 explains the ISO settings, which seem to be straight forward to me.. The larger the ISO number, the greater sensitivity to light, so the faster shutter speeds you can use (the larger the shutter speed number the faster it is - ie 125 is faster than 60). The drawback of the ISO is that more noise will appear in the images (dark areas look grainy)

To avoid blur, either take your shots on a tripod or ensure that the shutter speed is at least 1/60 of a second

Posted on Dec 29, 2008

pontelemon
  • 531 Answers

SOURCE: Black line across top of all my developed pictures

You have light leak somewhere to the film.
Usually from the bad film door seal.

Posted on Apr 02, 2009

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1 Answer

Where is apulture,iso,shutter speed options present in camera


This is one of the biggest drawbacks of a point&shoot camera. You're expected to point the camera and shoot the picture without worrying about minor details like aperture and shutter speed.
You can select the ISO by pressing the FUNC/SET button in the shooting mode and then selecting ISO (third item from the top along the left edge of the screen).
You can control the aperture and shutter speed somewhat by changing the scene mode. For example, the portrait mode will try to give you a wide aperture, the landscape mode will try to give you a small aperture, and the sports mode will try to give you a fast shutter speed.
If you want to take your photography above and beyond the point&shoot level then you need a more capable camera.

May 10, 2012 | Canon PowerShot A420 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What numbers on camera screens corner that's f3.0 1/30 ISO 200


f3.0 is the size of the lens opening. The larger the number, the smaller the opening.1/30 is the shutter speed.ISO 200 is the sensitivity speed of the sensor. The higher the number, the less light you need for a good picture. For example, 400 is twice as fast as 200...800 is 4 times faster, etc.

Nov 13, 2011 | General Electric W1200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do I set the Iso and flash


ISO is the sensitivity to light. The lower numbers 80, 100, 200 are the LEAST sensitive (but provide the best looking pictures). Sensitivity has to do with the amount of light needed to properly expose an image. ISO is a part of exposure that works with Aperture (f stop) and shutter speed (in seconds - or fractional seconds). Here's how it looks:

steve_con_63.jpg

The graphic above shows that varying either of these three values changes the exposure. If you change one by one step, you have to change one of the others by one step to get about the same exposure result. Each of the step values on your camera for the shutter, aperture and ISO is twice as much as the previous value. ISO 1600 is 2x ISO 800, which is 2x ISO 400, and 2x ISO 200 and finally, 2x ISO 100 (some cameras go to ISO 50 or less!).

The shutter works the same way: 1/1000 is 2x faster than 1/500, and 2x 1/125, and 2x 1/60, and 2 x 1/30, etc. These are easy to see the how each is twice as much as the other.

Finally, the aperture. Each "f stop" allows 2x as much light as the previous value. f2 lets 2x as much light as f2.8, which lets in 2x as much as f4, etc. I know the number don't double like you would expect, and the smaller numbers allow more light (you'd think it was the other way around) - but it's because we're talking about a circular lenses and it has to do with how we calculate area of a circle (3.14 x R squared). It may be easier to recall small numbers = equal large openings by thinking of f numbers with a "1/" over them - like this: 1/f1.4, or 1/f2, 1/f2.8, etc. Here's a chart that shows how aperture and shutter speed work together at one ISO setting.

steve_con_64.jpg

Read them across, the top line shows that 1/250 @ f1.4 is the SAME as 1/125 @ f2.0, which is also the SAME as shooting 1/60 @ 2.8, etc. If you were to increase the by one step, the shutter speeds would increase by a factor of two. Twice as much light by opening the aperture by a single stop means you must halve the exposure time or halve the ISO value. Likewise, if it's too dark to get a decent picture; increase exposure time or ISO value to capture enough light.

Assume a properly exposed picture requires 1/30 of a second at f5.6 with ISO 200. If the camera was increased by one step to ISO 400, you can take the picture a f5.6 still but in 1/60 sec - greatly reducing the chance of blur from holding the camera in you hand. You could even go up one more step to ISO 400 and shoot in 1/125 sec, which would reduce the blur even more. Fast shutter speeds reduce the "camera shake" and stop motion in sports photography - or other moving objects. If you had the camera set up on a tripod, you could dial the ISO down to ISO 100 and shoot at 1/30 of a sec at f5.6. If your lens can open up to f4, you can shoot in half the time because the lens is letting in twice the light. Some point and shoot cameras don't allow changing f stops or even shutter speeds - so all you can do it raise and lower ISO.

Which camera and flash do you have?

May 23, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Nixon S8100 fairly new camera, nice pics if the subject doesnt move but horrible pictures if object moves. Very blurry.


If everything in the picture is blurry, you are moving the camera when you press the shutter button. If only the subject is blurry and the background is clear the problem is too slow shutter speed. If this is cause by movement of the camera you must learn to SQUEESE the button while being sure you don't move the camera. It just takes a little practice. If this problem caused by a shutter speed that is too slow, it is remedied by increasing the ISO "film" speed. Even though you have no film, the camera has a "speed" setting that relates to that. The higher ISO value increases the camera's sensitivity to light and thus allows for faster shutter speed. Normally the ISO choices are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600. Try using 400. The ISO setting is in one of your camera menus. 400 is fast enough to solve your problem in all but very fast movement of either the camera or subject. Using ISO above 400 will cause your pictures to look grainy and not as sharp. Use the highest speed only when absolutely necessary. Slower ISO numbers produce the finest grain and thus the sharpest pictures. It a trade off between ISO and shutter speed because the exposure is a combination of the ISO and shutter speed and lens opening. Each one effects the exposure by half or double.

Apr 16, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

How do you take a picture of a fast movement?


It depends on the effect you want.
  • To freeze motion, you need either a fast shutter speed, or a fast flash in a dark environment. In less than bright light you may not be able to get a fast enough shutter speed to stop the action. Increasing the camera's sensitivity to light by increasing the ISO will help some.
  • You can blur the motion by using a slower shutter speed and a stable camera. Set a slow shutter speed and put the camera on a tripod or other stable surface, and you can get things like streaking car taillights and star trails. How slow a shutter speed depends on the speed of the subject.
  • You can pan with the subject. Move the camera with the subject, and keep it moving even while the display blanks out while taking the picture. This will keep the subject sharper while blurring the background to lend a sense of motion to the picture.
  • It's either to freeze motion if the subject is moving straight toward or away from you than if it's moving across your field of vision.

Sep 10, 2010 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

My pictures are blurry


It could be several things.
  1. What is the ISO and shutter set on? Low ISO and moderate light will force the shutter to go slower. Any shutter speed less than 60 will be blurry, getting blurrier and blurrier as the number goes down. You could try raising the ISO to get he shutter above 125 and see if that helps.
  2. It could be that the lens is too strong for the shutter speed being used. Generally make sure the shutter speed is at least the same or higher than the largest focal length of the lens. Example: A 70-300 lens should be used with a shutter speed of at least 300, but higher like 500 or 1000 would be better.
  3. Make sure you are holding the camera correctly, with both hands supporting the camera, you elbows tucked close you your body, your left hand supporting the full weight of the cameras, your right hand working the controls. Make sure you are squeezing the shutter button lightly and slowly, no punching ig or stabbing at it. This fast jerky movement can cause blur up to very high shutter speeds if you are not careful.
  4. Make sure the lens is functioning properly, that the m/a switch on the slide of the camera/and or lens is set to A for auto focus.
  5. Make sure the Auto focus sensor is set fo the broadest largest setting or that the focus sensor is set for where you want it not off the the side.

Nov 27, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shots coming out black or nearly black. I'm shooting in RAW. When I try and rescue them on photoshop they come out really grainy


Sounds like the shots are under exposed with the shutter speed to fast.
Are you shooting in low light and no flash ?

If so, reduce your shutter speed to something like 1/60 with an aperture of around F5.6 - F7.1 (these can be lowered if you raise your iso)

Obviously this will depend on the lens type and brand.

Your statement sounds like you are shooting in raw at a very fast shutter speed with a low iso (200).

The grainy effect is normally due to a lot of noise (high iso) which makes this sound strange to say the least.

Check your camera settings (menu) and turn on noise reducution, this will help in removing some of the noise.

Oct 31, 2009 | Nikon D40x Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D60x Blurry night pictures


Try switching to Shutter Prority (S) with a fast shutter speed.If the light is not so good, up the iso to 800 to gain that faster shutter speed..

You do not say the lens in use ? if VR, make sure its switched on or use a tripod.

Hope this helps

Jun 22, 2009 | Nikon DSLR D60X D60 Body DSLR 10.2M pix...

1 Answer

Outdoor pictures reveal white on LCD screen


The sensor for the auto-ISO may be working incorrectly. Try changing the ISO manually for different light modes. You can also try to change the white balance of the LCD. -Setting the white balance: 1. Set the camera to still image mode 2. Press the "Set" button 3. "White Balance" should be the current selection 4. Press the "Flower" button or "Flash" button to move through the available options for white balance 5. Press "Set" again when change appropriately - Setting the ISO: The higher the ISO value, the less light the camera needs to make an exposure, allowing the same exposure to be achieved with higher shutter speeds or smaller apertures. In a digital camera, higher ISO value allows higher shutter speed, at the expense of mottled or grain appearing in the final picture. 1. Set the camera to Still Image mode. 2. Press the "Set" button. 3. Press the "scn" or "timer" button to select ?ISO?. 4. Press the "Flower" or "Flash" button to select the desired setting. 5. Press the "set" button to select. 50/100/200 In the same lighting condition, the higher the ISO value is, the faster the shutter speed will be. I hope this helps.

Aug 06, 2007 | Polaroid i832 Digital Camera

2 Answers

C-2100UZ and low light


If you don't need a zoom, the best film P & S that you can get for what you described is an Olympus! It is the Olympus Stylus Epic which has a very sharp 35 mm f2.8 lens. The f2.8 lens with an ISO 800 or the new ISO 1600 film should fit your bill for low light, fast shutter speed photography. B & H has it for $80. Popular Photography magazine once called it the biggest bargain of all times for no-flash photography.

Sep 11, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-2100 Ultra Zoom Digital...

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