Question about Swiss Army Victorinox Chrono Classic Mens watch 241316

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Watch has stopped working

I haven't worn the watch in a while and noticed that it had stopped its movement. I tried setting the time again and winding the watch manually, but neither of those methods worked. Do I need to get it repaired, or is there a specific way to re-wind this watch so that it works again?

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I would guess that the battery is dead. If you take it to a jewelery counter in a department store they can check it for you. Best of luck.

Posted on Nov 23, 2013

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Movado stops when not worn


It is likely you need to take it to be repaired.
There is some small piece of metal or grease that clutches when the watch is in your wrist.

A good watch repair service will do the job.
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I'm not sure how to make the time start


You have to wind the watch manually after you buy it. there should be a little knob at about 3 o'clock. Turn it clockwise about 40 times. Make sure you wear it enough (8 hours a day) or else you have to wind it every day like this

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I have wound muy omega speedmaster automatic to tightly at the bezel and it has stopped working. Can you tell me if there is something inside that can be released tostart it again?


There's a misconception that mechanical watches can be "overwound." Mainsprings in old watches can indeed set in place and freeze up if they are wound tightly and not permitted to unwind, but the steel used in modern mainsprings used in the past 50 years or so is an alloy that's much less likely to bind up compared to 19th century pocket watches. In addition, the winding mechanism in an automatic (aka, self-winding) watch is designed to slip once the spring has been fully wound so that the rotor and winding parts aren't damaged by suddenly binding up. In a manual wind watch, once the mainspring is fully wound, it's simply not possible to wind the watch further unless the mainspring snaps or comes loose from its anchoring--in which case, you'd be able to wind the watch forever without ever storing power in the mainspring to drive the movement. While it is possible for a watchmaker to open your watch and release tension on the mainspring, it's overwhelmingly likely that something entirely different is keeping your watch from ticking and keeping time.

Mechanical watches generally stop running for two reasons: (1) lack of power to the movement; or (2) something in the movement that is preventing the movement from running. If your mainspring is fully wound, you have power to drive the movement. It's time to think about what could be causing #2.

Problems in the movement are usually caused by dust or dirt that preventing a delicate movement part from working properly (e.g., dirt at the pivots can freeze up a gear, stopping a movement). However, it's also possible to have a mechanical failure, such as a bent tooth on a gear in the train. A further possibility is so-called "overbanking," which some believe is the origin of the myth of overwinding. A mechanical watch's balance assembly drives a tiny little forked lever back and forth to control the escapement and the rate at which the watch keeps time. If the watch receives a physical shock or if the parts are worn, it's possible for this tiny lever to get bumped out of its tiny pivot and jammed in place. When that happens, the watch will stop, even though a superficial check will seem to indicate that the balance is still moving freely. At the same time, because the watch isn't ticking, the mainspring isn't unwinding, and so the watch cannot be wound further.

In my experience, watches usually stop running due to dirt at the pivots or on one or more gear teeth. I generally see overbanking in older watches or mechanical watches that have been less precisely made and not routinely cleaned over their working lives--though I have seen it also occur in a few newer watches that were dropped. Better designed watches--and I would include Omega in this category--have escapement levers with built-in guards to make it more difficult for them to overbank.

As for how dirt gets into a watch that's supposed to be water-resistant and generally sealed against exactly that problem--well, as odd as it sounds, watches "breathe," and this process draws in dust and dirt over time. Worn against the body, a watch warms up and expands the air inside it, pushing some of it out of the case; upon cooling, some air is drawn back into the case. This process is obviously reduced in watches designed with a significant degree of water resistance (aka 50 meters or more), but the process is accelerated when you pull the stem out to set the time or even wind the watch via the stem--there's some degree of air gap between the stem and the stem tube, or else it wouldn't be possible to turn the stem. This microscopic dust--in minute quantities--mixes with the lubricating oils inside a mechanical watch and increase the friction in some of the key pivots. Over time, the combination of naturally solidifying oils that are thickening and a minute amount of dust can turn lubricating oil into glue. The watch cleaning process flushes the old oil and accumulated dirt from the pivot bushings so that fresh, uncontaminated oil can be used to re-lubricate these key gear axles.

Bottom line: if your mechanical watch has stopped working, it's much more likely that something is interrupting the intricate gears in the watch movement rather than a problem with the mainspring. A competent watchmaker or watch repair technician should be able to identify the problem relatively quickly and give you a definitive answer as to the true cause of--and cost to fix--your watch.

Jun 11, 2011 | Watches

1 Answer

I haven't worn my fossil watch (FS 4337 model) for some time & decide to wear it & shook it, adjust it, & it dosn't work. Usually when I don't wear it for about 2 weeks, I shake it...


If you have a Fossil FS4337 Chronograph, shaking the watch shouldn't be doing anything other than exercising your muscles; the movement is a battery-driven quartz movement whose movement is controlled only by whether the stem has been pulled out (stopping the movement and saving power) or whether the battery still has enough power to activate the stepping motors that move the watch hands. Based on the symptoms that you've described, I would suggest that it's probably time to change your watch battery.

Often, when a watch battery is running low but isn't completely dead, pulling the stem into time-setting mode will stop the movement and permit the battery to "rest," giving it (briefly) a bit more reserve amperage to put out when you push the stem back in. That's how you can sometimes get a quartz watch to run for a few minutes after the battery appears to be dead. That may also be why your watch has started running again after you've set the time and date.

Fossil analog quartz watches tend to use silver oxide (usually #377 or #379) batteries instead of longer-lasting lithium batteries. In ordinary use, I would expect a silver oxide battery to provide between 1 and 2 years of service before it needs to be replaced. I can't remember if Fossil chronographs (which also use quartz movements) use a silver oxide or lithium battery. Lithium batteries often provide an additional year or two of service in analog watches, compared to silver oxide cells; digital watches using them supposedly may last as long as 10 years with a lithium battery, assuming you don't use the backlight or audible alarm functions. Note, however, that these batteries are different sizes and different voltages, so you can't substitute one for the other.

Finally, none of this advice applies if you have a Fossil watch with a true mechanical movement in it. In that case, gently shaking the watch may spin the winding rotor enough to start the watch back up again. However, an even faster way of winding those watches is to use the winding / time set crown to wind the mainspring directly instead of relying on the geared-down action of the winding rotor. Automatic watches can bind up if they are not used for a period of time; the lubricating oil used in some of the pivots can harden--or at least provide enough resistance that the movement may require more initial force to start running than to continue running. That behavior usually indicates that it's time to have the mechanical movement cleaned and re-lubricated.

May 31, 2011 | Fossil Brushed Brown Dial Chronograph...

1 Answer

The second hand will not re-set to zero. It has stopped. The watch works perfectly during the day apart from the second hand not moving, but , the watch stops at 11.15 at night. When I get up in the...


This is a symptom of what is usually several possible issues:

1) The most common is that the battery must be changed. Insist on Energizer batteries only (as they do not leak) and visit your local Certified Master Horologist for assistance in changing the battery and resetting the watch.
2) The movement must be serviced every 3-5 years by a qualified professional. Dust and debris can cause the symptom of stopping and starting the movement. If you have owned it for less time than this, remember that the watch may have been manufactured and in the retail location longer than this period of time before it was purchased.
3) The movement is defective or damaged. If the watch is under warranty, and it was purchased through an authorized dealer, Armani will take care of this issue for you at no charge.

To properly assess this issue, I recommend taking the first step, as a CMH also has the proper tools to test the movement and battery to determine the best next course of action.

watchandpen

Feb 25, 2011 | Giorgio Armani Emporio Armani watches...

1 Answer

Watch stops shortly after any movement


Automatic, or "self-winding" watches get their power from movement of your wrist throughout the day. Unless you're quite active the amount of movement is just about enough to keep it running till the next day. However, if you let the watch run down completely as you did when you were away, there is no reserve power left. The solution is simple: just manually wind the watch and you'll be good to go. To manually wind the watch unscrew the crown as if you were going to set the watch but do not pull it out as would for setting. Wind the watch about 40-50 turns and it will run fine if you wear it every day.

Apr 10, 2010 | Rolex Mens Airking Watch

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My watch has stopped keeping time but i can still hear it clicking. The indiglo still works as well so its not the battery. i will change the time and it will work again untill about 30 seconds to 1 minute...


Quartz watches do get gummy or dirty gears and slow down or just quit. I know that I have the cleaning chemicals that generally works to unstick the gears, but I also have the equipment that pulses the watch with enough power to get the mechanism working again. If that doesn't work then it's time to replace the movement with a new one. This is generally cheaper than spending lots of money on the labor to get the old movement working again. Best of luck on this one.

Nov 04, 2009 | Timex Expedition 40141 Wristwatch

1 Answer

My watch has stopped working


mcdevito75 here, Unless you have a good knowledge of takeing apart, even just the back off your watch / pocket watch it"s best to look for a small watch repair shop in your area, but here is what you can do to possibly start your watch / pocket watch. If your watch / pocket watch hasn"t been wound in some time and that time varies from watch to watch, the oil in the watch can become a bit thick so as to not allow the mechanism to work smoothly, leave the watch / pocket watch in a warm place, window sill in the sunlight wrapped in a paper towel for anywhere between a few minutes to 1/2 hour, after the watch / pocket watch has been warmed up hopefully the oil in the mechanism has liquified enough to allow the movement to start working. You can also give the movement a little boost, after the watch /pocket watch is warm, pull out the stem as if to set the time of day, move the stem and hands, sometimes this action will get the watch ticking again. If this fails, BEST BET specially if this is an expebsive or keepsake watch, look for a small watch repair shop in your area for serviveing. approx. $45.00

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1 Answer

Ebel sportwave chrongraph


It;s probably a difective movement mechinism.
Ed
NC Electronic
Mills, Wyoming

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Restarting my Citizen Promaster Eco Divers 200 Watch


Since it's eco-drive you can just wear it for a few hours and it should self-wind. The problem is that when it sits still for more than a few days it winds down. It gets its power from the natural movement of your wrist as you walk around.

Once it starts ticking again you'll just have to set the time correctly.

Dec 18, 2007 | Citizen Eco-Drive BL006056H Wrist Watch

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