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Coils are frozen on my standard electric heating system. It is not a heat pump

The coils, Freon lines, and condenser are frozen on my system. All electric, no heat pump.

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  • 22 Answers

The most common cause of coils, lines or components freezing over are low refrigerant charge, lack of airflow across coil or a blockage of the condensate drain. If the outdoor coil is frozen over then the defrost mechanism may not be working properly.

Posted on Nov 23, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

hotuna
  • 288 Answers

SOURCE: reversing valve

The first thing you need to do is fix the hole in the coil. It will only get worse no matter what you do. The reversing valve is controlled by the thermostat, then to the defrost board, as it has a timer, sensor and all that jazz. As to your question, that is a tricky one. The way I found worked best for heat pumps is to turn it to cool. If its so cold outside that it will not turn on because of an outside thermostat, cover the coil and yourself with a cardboard box or a large tarp. Give yourself some room of course, get a set of gauges that has temp. ring for R-22.Take suction temp. from the line about 1 foot from the compressor, look at the low side of the gauge and find the temperature, not the pressure for R-22. You should have a 20 degree differential. If more than 20, add freon, less remove. This sounds a little odd, but its easy to overcharge heat pumps on the heat mode. The condenser has a sensor that switches on the electric heat if the heat pump is not working. Ice on the condenser is normal on heat mode, that's why there is a defrost board.

Posted on Jan 12, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Goodman Condenser - Heat - Buzzing Noise every 60 seconds

You stated capasitor was checked . if cap. is ok sometimes start terminal wire will burn into at compressor or you may have a loose connection causing a voltage drop (more than 10%).If both check ok try a hard start kit. Who knows it might start. good luck

Posted on Jan 20, 2008

SOURCE: Electric Heater Coils Always On

We use the STW0925H! in 60 rooms on this property and have encountered similar problems that were caused by weldedd contacts on one of two relays that controls the electric strip heat. They can be replaced if needed.




PTHP's and PTACs employ thermal fuses as well as a bimetal limit stat on the heating element to limit risk if fan motor were to fail and the heating element were to remain energized. It would be wise to check that both are fuctioning properly while you are servicing the unit.

Posted on Mar 07, 2008

  • 14 Answers

SOURCE: furnace ices up,lines ice up,water condensation leaking in to duct work

1.check filter if really dirty change
2. check Refrigerant if low get charged by a tech
3. check the evaporator coil if dirty clean

Posted on Oct 16, 2008

meBNme
  • 334 Answers

SOURCE: High side low side pressures don not respond to freon levels

Chances are you have a TXV already installed. Thats why simply adding refridgerant is not effecting the pressures.

All you are doing by adding refridgerant is overcharging the unit, and possibly forcing the compressor to try to pump liquid instead of vapor. Not god for the compressor.

If the vibration noise is your only problem, I would try emilinating the vibration.
Find where the lineset is touching other parts of the house and install vibration dampening opads there. If the airahndler is mounted to the structure of the house, install vibration reduxction pads there too. If it is suspended from the floor joists you may have to change that mounitng method.

You can suspend the drain overflow pan and then set the unit in that on dampening pads, or set it on blocks from the floor/crawlspace.

Check your data sticker to find out how many pounds of refridgerant the unit takes.

By now, you are probably way overcharged.

Posted on Dec 24, 2008

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1 Answer

Rheem error codes


error code 29 is a high pressure open. possible causes are dirty indoor or outdoor coil. indoor or outdoor fan not running, liquid line Freon restriction, or to much Freon in the unit.

Jul 30, 2014 | Rheem RPRL048JEC 4 Ton 16 SEER Heat Pump...

Tip

Why your unit is freezing up.


To understand why your AC or heat pump is freezing up, it helps to know how your system works.

There are 7 major parts to an AC system, 9 with a heat pump.

1 - Condenser/heat pump (The outdoor unit)
2 - Air Handler (the indoor unit unless the system is a package unit, then all is outside in one system. The air handler is usually found under the home, in an attic, or in a closet.)

In the condenser are the following major parts.

3 - Compressor
4 - Condenser coil
5 - Condenser fan
6 - (HPs only) reversing valve

In the air handler are the following major parts.

7 - Blower motor
8 - Evaporator coil
9 - (HPs only) electric heat strips

Some systems known as "dual fuel systems" use another heat source in place of the heat strips, usually a gas furnace. I will address gas furnaces in another post.

When an air conditioner is operating properly several things are taking place.

1 - The compressor is compressing or "pumping" refrigerant through the system.

2 - through changes in pressure, the refrigerant makes the evaporator coil get very cold, and the condenser coil gets very hot.

3 - The blower motor/fan circulates air across the evaporator coils, as the room temperature air (Also known as "indoor ambient") goes through the cold coil, it exits, cooled approximately 15 to 20 degrees cooler than when it entered. (In a ducted system, the blower is also the fan that circulates the air throughout the home.)

4 - The condenser fan circulates air across the condenser coils. As the outdoor air goes through the condenser coil, it removes heat from the coils that are very hot. This in turn removes heat from the refrigerant so it can run its cycle again, and through pressure changes, cool the evap coil.

5 - With a heat pump, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant in the condenser and evaporator coils.
In AC mode, the evaporator coils get cold, and the condenser coils get hot. But in heat mode, the evaporator gets very hot, and the condenser very cold.

Now, whichever coil is getting cold will freeze up if there is inadequate air flow across the coil, as the refrigerant in it is far below freezing, and there is not enough airflow to keep the humidity in the air from freezing on the coil.

Things that can cause poor airflow are,

1 - Dirty/clogged coils
2 - dirty/clogged filter (will only effect evaporator coil)
3 - Closed/blocked vents (will only effect evaporator coil)
4 - Malfunctioning or dirty fan

Low refrigerant will also cause a coil to freeze up, reduce efficiency and cause the system to run for long periods of time. Not to mention, shortening the life of the unit.

With a heat pump, in heat mode only, the condenser (outdoor) coil will routinely begin to freeze up in cold temperatures. This is due to the fact that the refrigerant is below freezing, and the cold outdoor ambient temp is not warm enough to keep the condensation in the air from freezing on the coil.

Note, a properly working AC should never freeze up.

A heat pump is equipped with defrost controls to prevent ice buildup.
Some are controlled by timers, some by temp.

When a HP is going into defrost mode, the condenser fan shuts down, the reversing valve reverses the flow of refrigerant and the once cold condenser coil now gets very hot, defrosting the coil. (Many people have said this process sounds like the unit is coming apart, or about to explode and are frightened by the "smoke" which is really just steam from melting ice that comes off the unit.)

During defrost mode, the secondary or "auxiliary" heat comes on to ensure that you are still getting warm air from the vents. (Again, this can be electric heat strips or a dual fuel system)

If you are experiencing cold air from the vents during defrost, that means your auxiliary heat is malfunctioning.

The auxiliary heat is used for three purposes.

1 - during defrost mode to maintain warm airflow (automatic)
2 - when the HP cannot maintain the set temp due to extreme outdoor temps. It comes on when the indoor temp drops several degrees below the set temp on the thermostat (automatic)
3 - For emergency heat source when the HP is not working. (Manual)

To recap....

Iced up coils?

Poor airflow
low refrigerant
Malfunctioning fan
failing defrost system


There are two things that can be done in a pinch to help de-ice frozen coils. This may get you by until the repairman can get there, or you can fix the system if you are a do-it-yourselfer.

HPs frozen outdoor coil in heat mode, not going into defrost?

Cover most of the vents, and turn the system onto cooling mode until the outdoor coil is thawed. then uncover vents and return to heat, or emergency heat. (this usually takes 15 min or less)

Frozen coils in AC mode with a heat pump?
Turn the system to heat with the thermostat on just high enough to get the system to come on. (again, usually takes 15 min or less to thaw.)

AC only, with frozen evap coils? (this can sometimes be seen frozen all the way outside to the compressor on the copper lines.)

Turn the system off, and the fan switch from "auto" to on".
This will usually defrost the coils within 1 to 2 hours.
(If your system has the furnace in line before the evap coil, turn the system to heat, and the furnace will defrost the coil within minutes.)



on Dec 25, 2008 | Carrier XHB123D X/Y Series Heat/Cool Air...

1 Answer

Water leak in condensing furnace


Several problems can be associated with this problem

If running heat it is likely a drain hose or Drain connection that is plugged up. Simply blowing these lines out can solve your problem.

If running AC it is likely a Drain from the coil to the Drain line that is plugged up, or you have frozen the unit up. Check the unit outside, if the big copper line or compressor is frozen, turn system off immediately and call a service company to check the system out.

I also recommend changing your air filter every 3 months if you haven't done so.

Mar 06, 2014 | American Standard Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Lennox 10HPB36-10P is blowing luke warm air.


What coil is getting cold? In cooling the evaporator coil should be getting cold not the outdoor condensing coil. Verify you have the tstat setup for heat pump, verify you have a proper refrigerant charge.

Apr 19, 2017 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

OD model#, CKL36- 1F and the indoor model#, AR36-1. The indoor does not have the electric heat strip in it but has the place for it. I want to convert it to a heat pump. Is it a 3 ton system? How many KW...


You can use the existing air handler for a heat pump condenser unit up to 3 tons. The line set, evap coil are fine for a heat pump.
The electric heat strip issue can be another problem, you can put several different size strips in depending on what may be needed where you live, the power requirements will differ with each heat strip, for example a 5KW (5000 watt) heat strip requires a 2 pole 30 amp circuit for heat strip and air handler combination.

Aug 22, 2011 | Goodman CKL36AR36 Air Conditioner

1 Answer

Air conditioning not too cold ??


Hello,
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Let me explain in layman's terms how the air conditioning (AC) system works and what could be happening to your car.

Like your body, the air conditioning compressor is the heart of the AC system, and Freon is the blood. The compressor pumps Freon throughout the AC system, either the older type R12 which costs as much as gold it seems these days, or the new environmentally-friendly R134A Freon. This Freon is a gas and liquid combination that is compressed and circulated throughout the air conditioning system. The compressed Freon is pushed through the system under pressure and is passed through different sized metal and rubber hoses and a special valve called an expansion valve that cause the gas to expand and contract.

This expansion and contraction makes the Freon gas very cold. This cold gas makes its way via metal lines into the dash area of your vehicle to the evaporator core. This evaporator core is like a small radiator, except it has cold Freon circulating inside and not hot antifreeze. A small fan (the AC blower fan which you control from the control panel on the dash) sits in front of the evaporator core and blows air across this cold evaporator and then through the vents inside your vehicle.

The other objective of the air conditioning system is to remove the heat from inside the cab of the vehicle. This heat is removed by the Freon with the help of the AC condenser located at the front of the car (usually in front of the radiator). The Freon coming back from the evaporator carries the heat from the cab to the condenser via rubber and metal hoses. Just like your radiator, the condenser is lightweight aluminum with many internal winding coils.
The Freon travels through these coils, and in between these coils are small slits or fins that the Freon is forced through. The condenser will have an electric cooling fan mounted in front or behind it to push or pull air through these fins to remove the heat from the Freon. Some vehicles still use the old fashioned fan blade driven by the engine to pull air across the radiator and the condenser.
Now I know that is just a tidbit of information on how the air conditioning system works, and it is very general, but I wanted you to know what to look for to give you insight as to what might be happening with your vehicle.
A few causes of low cooling efficiency or no cooling at all at idle are:

Lack of air flow across the condenser. Make sure the electric cooling fan motor near the condenser is coming on, or in models that are equipped with a fan blade make sure this fan is turning and is turning very fast.

Low Freon levels. Freon level and pressure should be checked by your certified air conditioning mechanic.

Overheating. If the engine is running hot or overheating, it can have a noticeable negative affect on the air conditioning system. Some cars have two electric cooling fans, one for the air conditioning condenser and the other for the radiator. Make sure they are both working properly. Usually at idle on a hot day with the AC on both fans will be on.

When the vehicle is traveling at freeway speeds, the compressor is pumping the Freon throughout the system much faster and harder than at idle. There is a dramatic increase in air flow across the condenser due to 55 mph winds, and the engine is usually operating at a cooler, more efficient temperature as well, thus allowing the air conditioning system to operate efficiently.
Note: An air conditioning system that is somewhat low on Freon can still feel comfortable at freeway speeds due to the added air flow across the condenser which can overcome the ill effects of slightly low Freon. Periodic air conditioning performance checks by your mechanic are the best way to keep the system in great shape.

Hope this helps.

Goodluck

Oct 08, 2010 | 1998 Cadillac DeVille

1 Answer

I have a heat pump that when turned on the tube get cold and condensation develops but 45 seconds later cooling stops and compressor keeps running. the coil for the reversing valve is not energized, there...


Sounds like low on freon. The suction line will turn cooler upon first start up. Heat pumps do sound scary but you all ready have cked the reverse valve coil, ck the lines in\out temp. If you can ck temps on your suction line vers press. repost if you need more help.

Jul 10, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

My intertherm heat pump has freon but will not heat is it posible that the reversing valve is stuck in the middle and will not let it heat if so where can i get a new one. My heat pump cools good and when...


You can't replace a reversing valve (must remove ALL refrigerant first), unless you are EPA certified and have the equipment to recover the refrigerant and to braze the old valve out and the new one in. That said, it's probably an electrical problem anyway. Could be the thermostat, the thermostat settings, the wiring between the thermostat and the furnace and the condenser, or the controls in the condenser - probably not in the furnace. If you don't see anything wrong you're probably gonna need a pro.

May 05, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Amana heat/air conditioning pump


You are going to have to increase the amount of heat absorbed by the evaporator coil on the indoor section of your system. First change the filter. Second turn the power off to the outdoor section and leave the indoor fan running until all the ice on the evaporator coil has thawed this could take a few hours. Third you need to verify that you are getting adequate airflow across the indoor evaporator coil and the outdoor condenser coil both fans should be spinning at full speed and airflow should be unobstructed by dirty coil fins or debris Hopefully after you've done this you will have cold air blowing inside and the larger of the two lines entering the unit outside will be cool to the touch but not frozen or even frosted regardless of run time and the small one should be the slightly warm but not hot. If the larger line continues to freeze then it could indicate a number of problems but essentially your condensers cooling capacity is outrunning your evaporator coils ability to absorb heat from air stream circulating in your home.Hope it works out for you GL!

Jun 10, 2008 | Amana PTH123B25AJ Heat Pump Air...

1 Answer

Reversing valve


The first thing you need to do is fix the hole in the coil. It will only get worse no matter what you do. The reversing valve is controlled by the thermostat, then to the defrost board, as it has a timer, sensor and all that jazz. As to your question, that is a tricky one. The way I found worked best for heat pumps is to turn it to cool. If its so cold outside that it will not turn on because of an outside thermostat, cover the coil and yourself with a cardboard box or a large tarp. Give yourself some room of course, get a set of gauges that has temp. ring for R-22.Take suction temp. from the line about 1 foot from the compressor, look at the low side of the gauge and find the temperature, not the pressure for R-22. You should have a 20 degree differential. If more than 20, add freon, less remove. This sounds a little odd, but its easy to overcharge heat pumps on the heat mode. The condenser has a sensor that switches on the electric heat if the heat pump is not working. Ice on the condenser is normal on heat mode, that's why there is a defrost board.

Jan 12, 2008 | Heating & Cooling

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