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9-hole Peg Test - Sammons Preston Rolyan 9-hole Peg Test Kit - Model A8515

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DOES THE HOLE HAVE TO BE BLOCKED ON THE REGULATOR AND HOSE ASSEMBLY ON THE 5 BURNER DGFS10SSP 2015?


The hole you are referring to is on the gas supply side of the regulator I guess. It is a very small hole and looks like it is blocked but is probably open. It lets high pressure gas into the regulator which reduces the gas pressure before sending it to the burners. The best way to test it is open and the regulators is working is to disconnect the hose to the burners and place it into a can of water. Bubbles means it is working.

Jun 22, 2016 | Barbie Pet Doctor Doll w Cat Dog...

Tip

Clock Bushing Replacement


BUSHING TIPS



-One of the most common stoppage problem is caused by increased friction and mostly due to lack of incorrect amount of or lack of oil. If discovered in time, the movement can be cleaned and oiled with only high quality Clock oil, then it will be good for another 5 years or so. Insufficient lubricants eventually cause wear in the pivot holes and/or bushings.
-After a pivot is worn it will change the depth of the wheels and pinions to such an extent that the power train will stop due to improper gear meshing. Wear causes a pivot hole to become egg shaped.

HOW TO TEST

-One testis to completely let off the power from the power train and rock the main wheel back and forth. Then you will clearly see the pivots that have the problem jumping back and forth.


Sample one:
image006.jpg
Sample two:
Examples of EGG Shaped pivots above.

WHEN DO YOU NEED BUSHING REPLACEMENT?

-One rule of thumb used by many repair persons, if a bushing is worn one third or more the diameter of the pivot it needs to be replaced.
-Above is Two example of a worn pivot's [note the black gum med up oil around the pivot in photo above]. This is a dead give away of a potential problem.

centerline PIVOT

-Before disassembly, mark all bushings that need replacement in the correct geometrical direction of centerline.
-Complete disassembly of movement is required.
-Then you will need to file out the exact opposite direction with a small file, this will ensure that when you start drilling out the hole it will be centerline.
-Set-up the drill press and lock the plate on to the drill press making sure you find the centerline of the original pivot hole. Use a steel short stock the same diameter of the old pivot and chuck it in the drill press after the plate is secure, select the proper bushing that you intend to press in.












PRESSING IN THE BUSHING
-With a small broach taper slightly the inter plate before the insertion of the bushing. Do this from the inside of the plate, this will ensure that the bushing will never fall out.
image008.jpg bushpress.jpg

-Select a bushing that is a bit undersized after it is pressed into place, then open the hole up to the correct diameter.
-Use the drill press to push in the new bushing from the inside plate out.
-Be sure to broach out the pivot bushing in both directions, this will leave the hole in an hour glass shape ”===)I(===” and will reduce friction.

COUNTER SINKING.
counter.jpg
- Counter Sinking is very important and not only needed to hold the oil in place but also to reduce the amount of actual friction on the pivot. [Note:] don't get carried away the first gears tend to have a lot of torque on them and a lot of bushing surface is needed; however, the final pivots do not and are very sensitive to friction.
-Barrel Bushings, these are often overlooked. This is an example of a bushing before and after replacement.

Hope this tip helps.

R/
David

http://antiqueclock.clockstop.com/bushing.htm

on Jan 22, 2010 | Watches

1 Answer

How do i remove a watch stem?


Sometimes you have to remove a screw, sometimes you have to press a little peg down. Without a proper description I would not start working on a watch
See the small screw to the right of the stem? that is one of the many possibilities.
d7428e48-3f8f-49b5-b2da-86174c8a7900.png

Jul 17, 2014 | DKNY Watches

1 Answer

Casio dw-290-t, springs came out when changing battery, I know wher 1 goes not the other?


The smaller spring is steel with gold plating. It goes into a hole that is near the outside diameter of the battery. You must remove the outer steel retainer to see the hole. Leave the other parts assembled. They will be loose at this point. When you look inside the hole you should see a gold bottom which is really a contact on the board. Insert the spring with the smaller diameter end into the hole. If you have the correct hole then the larger end of the spring will fit just perfectly. Assemble the outer steel retainer. Finish assembly.

Next time you replace the battery only remove the battery strap and leave the other parts intact. Good luck.

Jun 22, 2012 | Watches

1 Answer

The digital display on my Fossil JR-7747 has gone blank. No difference even with new battery. Is there any way to get a replacement works for this model as I really like its simple lines and appearance.


if you replaced the battery you self you didn;t ground out the dig memory. if you open up hte watch nere the battery the id a small hole in the movment with a little tiny hole and there will be and airow pointing to the hole . you need to put a small paper clip down the hole to the bottom and then touch the other end to the top of battery. that should clear the memory and you problem

Jul 12, 2009 | Watches

1 Answer

Buy and replace new watch band ?


I just replaced the band on a women's ironman watch, so I know it is tricky, but can be done. First remove the old band using a small flat blade screwdriver and determine that the spring bars that came with the new band are the right size by comparing with the old ones. My new ones were too large. Then, use a pen to make marks on the back of the watch case in alignment with the spring pin holes . Put a spring pin into the band and position the band on the watch the way it will be attached, with the pin just above the marks. Use the small flat blade screwdriver to insert one of the spring bars into its hole and align the other side of the spring bar with its mark on the case. Compress the spring bar and slide it down until it roughly aligns with its hole, then, push the band sideways toward the hole and wiggle the band until the pin seats. Apparently the hole alignment is very tight and, without that last step, the pin simply will not seat. After spending a lot of time with the first strap, locating the spring pin hole by trial and error, I used a magnifying light for the second strap to allow me to see the spring bar hole, making the process a lot faster.

Mar 13, 2009 | Timex Sports Ironman Triathlon 100-Lap...

1 Answer

Casio broken


The band must be replaced, that part is not replaceable. Sorry.

Dec 05, 2007 | Casio AWS90D-2AV Wrist Watch

1 Answer

Leather wrist strap


I would scrap the strap - the odours are caused by the tanning chemicals getting wet. Retain the fastening and purchase half a meter of nylon ribbon loop it through the case pegs on one side glue them together and pierce for buckle holes. On the buckle side loop it through both case peg and buckle and fold and glue. You have a choice of colour and it cost only fraction of a new leather one- also you will have enough left to make two straps

Sep 12, 2007 | Field and Stream F25SLUMI Wrist Watch

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