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Echo the sound was great nothing changed on board but just stated echoing real bad for no reason the loader you get in the mic the worse the echo gets

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Eq for male vocal mic on mackie 1604 vlz3


There is no easy answer to this. It will depend on the mic, the speakers and the singer and genre amongst many other things. It will also probably be room dependent too although the overall eq should be able to take this out of the equation to a large extent.
Your best bet is to get someone to sweep the frequency on the mid range with a bit of positive and then a bit of negative eq to find where most affects your vocals then fine tune to your liking. Are you using a bit of reverb/chorus/echo as his can often, when used sparingly, enhance even a good singer. The biggest difference you'll probably find is from using different mics. The ubiquitous SM58 does not suit everyone but is robust, warm and forgiving but if you're after a more pure sound there are many more accurate mics you can try.

Aug 10, 2014 | Mackie 1604 Vlz3 16 Channel Mixer

Tip

Studio Recording at Home; Part Deux


This tip, continuing the series of Home Studio Recording, focuses on the hardest part of accomplishing this feat: Drums.

A big sound killer on 'budget' recordings is poorly recorded drums. There is a remedy, though. If you have one set of drum mics, buy another (or borrow. This will come into play later, though).

If you have clips that hold them on the drums, great. With the two sets, you'll only use half of the clips. For the rest of the mics, you'll want stands. You'll need one stand for each drum, plus six.

The dual mics serve this purpose: To capture the sound of the whole drum. One mic for the batter head (the side you hit), and one for the resonator (the side you don't).

For the batter head, you'll use the mic clips, and attach the mics as you normally would during playing. For the resonator head, use the stands to position the mic directly across the drum, making a straight line from the top of the drum to the bottom. This will help eliminate any voicing differences, which can be a real headache.

For the bass drum, you'll need 2 stands. Position the batter head mic close to the edge of the head on whatever side is easiest to access, but is also comfortable for your playing style.

Aim the mic so that it is pointed at a midway point between the center of the head and the edge. You can experiment with different spots, but be sure to NEVER let the mic be directly in front of the head.
For the bass resonator head (the front one that everybody sees), position the mic so that it is a mirror image of the batter mic. Once again, this gets rid of voicing problems.

You have just miked your drum kit, but what about cymbals? That's where the other 4 mics and stands come into play. Those 4 will take care of:

Hi-hats

Ride

Overheads

For the hi-hats, you'll want to position the mic about 3-5 inches from the top, and 2-4 inches from the side. It's best to come in from the outside of the kit, so that you'll pick up a bit of ambiance (the rest of the kit, as well as some natural reverb). Point the mic at a point close to midway between the bell and edge of the hats. Too close to the edge, and you'll get a sound similar to banging trash can lids together. Too close to the bell, and there's too much high-mid noise that CANNOT be reduced with an EQ.

For the ride, follow the same instructions for the hi-hats, but add about 2 inches to the distances. Aim the mic a little closer to the center as well, so that the mic will pick up any bell hits. A good spot is 1/4 the distance between the bell and edge.

Now for overheads. These are the mics that not only record the cymbals, but pick up the most ambiance.

NOTICE: I haven't already mentioned it, but you do NOT want to record with the drum kit up against a wall, nor do you want it in the center of the room. For best results, use the midway rule (as with placing mics on drums and cymbals, place the kit midway between the center of the room and the edge, preferably headed towards a corner). This will reduce unwanted echoes in the room due to sound reflection.

You will want to place the overheads about 1.5 feet above the highest cymbal. Space them out so that the entire kit is between them, but be sure to keep them evenly spaced. You'll want to use the snare as a midway marker for the placement of overhead mics, since it is your loudest drum, and more likely to be picked up in the overheads than any other drum. This will also keep the snare panned center (you'll be panning the drums out to the left and right later on the mixer, but the snare and bass stay center).

These are some guidelines for setting up mics for recording drums at home. I hope that helps, and stay tuned for Part Trés of Home Studio Recording.

on Mar 13, 2011 | Music

1 Answer

How do i reduce effects


if you have echo during session try installing foam around the room you are in ... so that sound don't bounce off the walls to mic on a recording session..

Aug 12, 2012 | Behringer UB2442FX / Harbinger APS12 PA...

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My mpk 25 does not record long notes in Reason 5 only short poping sound. it record drums sound perfectly but string and horns long sounds a sounds like short piano sounds like popping noise. not the full...


Make sure you do NOT send the notes back to the MPK25, that is echo is off. If you echo them the data will be confused. This will be a setup in the Reason SW.

Sep 21, 2011 | Akai Mpk25 Keyboard Controller, 25 Keys...

1 Answer

I just received my RSQ-echo 2000 karaoke machine. When I plug a mic into the front 2 mic inputs, they both have echo, even tho I turned off the echo volume in the back. I assumed that by turning it all...


The control supposedly controls the mix of the echo... this is a reverb type sound. Please note that room acoustics AND if the mic's "hear" the speaker in this, it may create an echo that is NOT under control of the adjustment. Make sure the mic's cannot "hear" the speaker or a reflection off a wall.

Aug 17, 2011 | RSQ NK 2000U

1 Answer

I had major static sounds from my yamaha stagepas 500. I plugged in an acoustic guitar into the mixer while running a keyboard and 2 vocal mics. I started getting crackling sounds. I changed the patch...


Chances are there is nothing wrong with the mixer. IF you accidentally turned on Phantom power, that would cause the problem. Phantom is ONLY used with condenser mics and a few DI boxes. Turning it on can create noise unless balanced lines are used everywhere.

Jun 29, 2011 | Yamaha EMX512SC Powered Mixer 500 Watts...

1 Answer

I have a Yamaha IM8. I had a condenser mic hooked into channel one with phantom power on. I had to leave the room for a while and when I came back, I noticed some rather severe popping in the audio. I turn...


There is really no way for a condenser mic to damage the board UNLESS you break the ground and get a static discharge into the input. That can happen with any microphone and has NOTHING to do with the phantom being on or off. As phantom power goes on and off slight bias at the input preamps can make amps non-linear causing the raspy sound you heard. The Phantom LED means NOTHING as it shows the state of the phantom switch by connecting a 12 volt source through a resistor to the LED... It shows NOTHING regarding the state of the 48 volt supply. Each input circuit has two 6.8Kohm resistors to the swinger of the phantom switch 2nd pole that either grounds those or connects them to a filtered 48 volt source. As long as you don't have a static buildup there is NO need to turn phantom power on or off while connecting a condenser microphone. At each input when using the XLR jacks are two per side 470pf capacitors for RF bypass. For the XLR's there is a 10Kohm between the signal lines and two series 10mfd/50 volt caps in series of each input to block the DC, when using phantom power, from reaching the preamp stage. These caps have to charge and discharge when changing the state of phantom power so you should AVOID having the main amps being driven while changing the state of any phantom power. Always have the fader(s) down and any monitors down to avoid a thump and also the non-linear raspy transition as the input caps charge/discharge. So fix the microphone... don't know what type you have, but DO check the cable (first) as ALL three conductors MUST be good for a condenser mic to work on phantom power. A ground leakage or noisy connection will cause your symptoms. Use a SHORT known good cable right at the board to test the mic. The 48 volts is applied through the two 6.8K resistors between both the signal lines to the shield of your XLR cable. The microphone picks off the 48 volts with a similar circuit.
Now let's cover a very important thing regarding system safety: ALL, and I do mean ALL interconnected equipment MUST be powered from the same source. Professionals run a power cord back to their mixer right alongside the snake. This is to avoid ground bounce damage due to bad building grounds or ground faults.

Mar 22, 2011 | Yamaha IM824 24 Channel Mixing Console IM8...

1 Answer

I have just bought a peavey xr800f powered mixer but unable to get echo on mics any help would be appreciated thanks


There are SEVERAL things to set. First is setting the EFX mix for those channels you want the effects to be active. Next, select the effect you want AND the TIME for the effect and FINALLY the amount of the effect output to go to the MAIN and MONITOR outputs. Also the effect disable button below the effects needs to be in the correct state. ALL of these have to be set for using the effects on the mics.

Feb 07, 2011 | Peavey XR 8600D Powered Mixer

1 Answer

No live sound using Samson CO3U and Windows 7 x64


I don''t think you can solve this problem. The problem is that the computer has to digitize the incoming audio, then echo it out. This conversion takes time and is also governed by the real time clock servicing of the devices. You could try upping the priority of the conversion process, but I don't think you are going to be satisfied with the result either.

You would be happier to use a mic and external mixer where the audio is true real time rather than having the conversion latency time.

Jan 29, 2010 | Samson Audio C03upak Co3u Microphone with...

1 Answer

Mic channels 2 and 3 don't work no sound. mic channels 1 and 4 work okay as well as inputs 5-12. how can i fix this??


There is an internal f ailure and the unit will require servicing. To get by until you can get it fixed, you can get line transformers that will allow the mics to be used on the higher channels.

If you have inadvertently plugged a source into the :insert" jacks of these bad channels by mistake, that may have blown the input op-amps.

A lot of dis-assembly of the board must be done to get to the parts to repair.

Another possibility is if the sliders have gone bad... SAME prognosis for repair.

Dec 26, 2009 | Mackie 1202vlz3 12 Channel Mixer

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