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Manual Phllips pm61151 Audio/Video Switchbox - GPS

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How do I hook up my Apple TV to onyko 8050 receiver?


Hi Barry
AppleTV has 2 Outputs on the back. One is Optical for Audio Only and requires a Toslink fibre optic cable to get the good quality audio into the 8050 receiver via the Game 1 Port.
The second connector is HDMI which is a compact low profile cable which transfers both HD1080 Video and Left & Right Audio to another device.
The built in WiFi should be picking up your Router WiFi in the house and transferring iTunes music to these Ports. Just play a song on iTunes on your computer & click the icon to select AirPlay on your ATV.
There are a heap of HD TV's and Amp's etc using HDMI these days.
It's the simplest way to get connected & its the best quality.
Unfortunately the Onyko 8050 uses a proprietary port which is not directly compatible.
I noticed all the Video Ports on the back of the Onyko are the old fashioned Yellow RCA connectors. (Called Composite Video.)
There are converter boxes & cables of various sorts that you could use on eBay, Amazon etc.
See: www.amazon.com/HDMI-RCA-VGA-Cable-1-8m/dp/B002ZUI68G

Further Help:
https://discussions.apple.com/message/16046694
http://www.miniinthebox.com/hdmi-to-5rca-cable_p399811.html?currency=AUD&litb_from=paid_adwords_shopping

NOTES:
Many modern Amplifiers also become the main SwitchBox to transfer Video & Audio from one device to another. eg. My Pioneer VSX-922 has 5 HDMI input ports and 1 HDMI output port along with an assortment of RGB & Toslink Inputs & Outputs.
This way (via remote control) I can choose the Apple TV to Connect to the Plasma HD TV or The DVD Player to play Video or Audio to the Speakers. HDMI Makes the cabling so much easier.

For Future reference, when checking out new HiFi gear, always check the ports on the back of the unit.
Your Ports/Cables go by age.
1: Yellow-Composite Video RCA Plug (oldest)
2: Red & White RCA Plug (Audio Left & Right)
3: S-Video-Mini Din Connector (Video Only)
4: RGB- Component Video (Red,Green,Blue-Video Only)
5: DVI- Digital Video Interface (HiDef Video Only)
6: Toslink- Fiber Optic (Audio Only)
7. HDMI-High Definition Media Interface (HD Video & Audio)
I Hope this Explanation Helps Many Others with Similar Problems.
We don't get paid for Assisting People ... So!
If you find this helpful....
PLEASE Click the Button to Acknowledge!

Jun 29, 2014 | Onkyo TX8050 Network Audio ONLY Receiver

1 Answer

What do i need to buy to get it to work on my new tv


How to Connect Your Old Videogame System rca_cable.jpgIf you've just dug your old videogame system out of the attic, you might not remember exactly how to connect it. They're not quite like modern game systems, and may require something extra to connect it to that brand new TV you have. To the left is the cable you should see attached to your videogame system. It is typically called RCA, and you will have to use some sort of adapter before you connect it to your TV. While it looks like it should fit into one of the composite jacks (and it will actually fit), that will not work because the audio and video signals are being carried in the same cable. In order to use the composite jacks on your TV, you will have to separate the audio and video signals somehow (described below). The following instructions are relevant to most vintage videogame and computer systems that connect to a television. Specifically, the Atari 2600, 5200, and 7800. However, if you have the 4-port (four joystick ports) version of the 5200, you need a special switchbox. Try eBay or Best Electronics (catalog item) for this proprietary switchbox. If you have the 2-port version of the 5200, you can use the methods described below. coax_jack.jpg composite_jack.jpg Coaxial CompositeThe first thing you need to do is figure out what type of connection you're going to make. Look at the back of your TV and compare to the pictures to the left. It's much easier to connect to a coaxial jack, and this is what most people will do. Composite will give you better audio and video quality, but you must perform a hardware modification.
Coaxial

rca_coax_adapter.jpg
Coaxial (F-type) to Female RCA Adapter
Radio Shack part #278-276

tv_switchbox.jpg
Manual TV/Game Switchbox with Coaxial Output
uhf_adapter.jpg
300 to 75 Ohm Matching Transformer
Coaxial is by far the easiest way to connect your old game system, and the method most people will use. This is the 'cable ready' input that is found on every TV made today (and for some time now). If you don't at least have this connection, you have our sympathy. There are several methods you can use for this connection.
The best way is to get a Coaxial to RCA adapter (left). It is cheaper, smaller, and provides a better signal than the traditional TV/Game switchbox. This is a small plug that will cost you about $3 at Radio Shack. It is called a "Gold-Plated Phono-to-F Adapter" and the Radio Shack part number is 278-276. Just connect it to the RCA cable of the game system, then plug the other end into the coaxial ("cable") jack on the TV. Set the TV to the channel that the game system is set to (usually 2-4), and your're ready.
If you still have an old TV/Game switchbox and you don't want to buy something new, you can use that. You can also purchase these at Radio Shack for about $5, but if you're going to go buy something we recommend the adapter described above. Some TV switchboxes have built-in coaxial output, some do not. If yours does not, you will need to buy a 300 to 75 Ohm matching transformer (again, about $2 at Radio Shack). If you you do have coaxial output on your switchbox, just plug the game system's RCA cable into the switchbox, connect the switchbox to your TV's coaxial ("Cable In") jack, and push the switch to "Game" or "Computer". Note - you cannot use the 'automatic switching' boxes that newer game systems like the NES use - the signal in most old systems is not strong enough to trigger the automatic switching, so be sure you buy a manual switchbox.
Most new TV/Game switchboxes will allow you to connect your Cable TV and Videogame system at the same time, but the picture is often less than ideal. We recomend a coaxial selector - this will allow you to choose between inputs (game, cable, whataver) at the touch of a button. We found this one at Parts Express for about $6.
av_switchbox.jpg AV Switchbox
Composite composite_jack.jpgAny way you slice it, generating composite output takes more work. How much more depends upon exactly what you want to do. To get true composite signals, you will need to be handy with a soldering iron and modify your Atari 2600 internally. If you've never soldered anything before, it might be a little tricky, but it's worth it for the clean signals! You may also notice that modern equipment has left and right audio jacks - this is for stereo sound, but you can't get stereo sound from your 2600 unless you make further hardware modifications. So if you make the mod, you'll just have one audio cable in use. vcr_composite.jpgNow if you don't want to do that, but you're using a monitor or tv without a coaxial input (for example, a Commodore monitor), there are other options. You will still have to convert the signal to coaxial first (see Coaxial section). Then, if you have a VCR handy, you can run the coaxial connection into the VCR, and then use the composite outputs from the VCR. This will not give you the true signal clarity of composite audio/video, but it will allow you make that composite connection. If you don't have an extra VCR for this, you can probably go buy a junker at the local thrift store - the tape mechanism doesn't need to work, just the demodulator. Demodulator's rarely go bad on VCR's, they're usually thrown out because of the tape mechanism. Speaking of demodulators, you can simply use one of these instead of taking up all that space with a VCR. Unfortunately, these are much more expensive ($100+) and you're not likely to find one in a thrift. Unless you're going to make a hardware modication, we really recommend using a straight coaxial connection, because going through a VCR/demodulator defeats the purpose of a composite connection.

Feb 15, 2011 | Atari Video Game Consoles & Games

1 Answer

Does anyone know how to set up an old nintendo game


I am assuming you mean a nintendo entertainment system (NES)
You Need:
The gray master console
At least 1 controller
Power supply
RF Switchbox (Must be an auto switchbox) or an A/V Cable with RCA ends

The power supply & RF switch plug into the back of the grey master unit. Hook the RF switch up to the cable connection on your TV. (If using the A/V cable - it plugs into the side of the master unit & into a video in - yellow plug/audio in - white plug) Plug in the power supply. Make sure a controller is plugged into the 1 outlet on the front. Make sure a game cartridge is inserted & locked in (You push it down). The TV needs to be on whatever channel the switch is set on if using the RF switch (Channel 3 or 4). Turn on the power & it should work

Jan 03, 2010 | Nintendo DS Console

1 Answer

I need XP drivers for a Belkin 4-Port DB25 Switchbox, model f1b028-e


err, its just a passive switch so there are no drivers needed. It just passes the signal through it to the printer

Nov 22, 2009 | Belkin 4-Port DB25 Switchbox [ F1B028E ]...

1 Answer

Change my rca xl 100 to it video input without a remote


ye a tech can do that.he'll make a extension of the video input at rear.or you can buy a switchbox for that.

May 20, 2009 | RCA E13309 13-Inch Diagonal XL-100 Color...

1 Answer

PS3 setup/withHDMITV


1 cable from the PS3 goes to input 1 on switchbox 1 cable from directtv goes to input 2 on switchbox 1cable from output of swichbox to your tv.

Dec 07, 2007 | Sony Playstation 3 (PS3) Console

1 Answer

Can i send video from Nintendo Wii through my home theater to my projector?


A few things to consider; what type of connection is your Wii using? Composite, component, s-video, coax? Most home theater setups are made to route multiple video signals, usually of the Composite (RCA Red Yellow White) variety, and should be clearly labeled Video In. If it doesn't have extra inputs, you might want to consider buying a media switchbox- http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/searchdetail.asp?sk=MC71730&productID=7663 A switch like the one linked above allows you to hook multiple audio and video sources into it and easily switch between them by pressing a button on the front.

May 22, 2007 | NexxTech ESDVD100 System

2 Answers

P1110 Blurry/dubble image


your beam needs calibration take it 2 a pro... windman

Jan 28, 2006 | Dell UltraScan P1110 21" CRT Monitor

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