Question about RCA RP7887 High-Performance Super Radio

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AM reception/AM power problems

I bought this radio a couple weeks ago to listen to talk-radio while at work. The AM reception in the building I work in is fine on other radios I've tried. I bought the Superadio in hopes that I could get even better AM reception. Unfortunately, I am getting worse reception on most stations I listen to and no reception at all on others. While on "wide-band" setting I get no stations lower on the dial than about 1200 (though occassionally, if I turn the radio around and spend a lot of time tuning it, I sometimes can pick up a station or two for a few minutes, then they go away almost as if the radio is losing power). Using "normal band," I can only get a few stations on the entire dial (but too much static to be enjoyed). FM seems to work alright -- but I haven't messed with it a lot. I've tried an external antenna (albeit, a cheap indoor one), and it makes no difference at all. Is there anything I can do to fix this? Can I open it up, make a few wire adjustments and get better am reception, or should I just return it?

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Re: AM reception/AM power problems

A portable Loopstick tuning antenna is probably the BEST option. Also, the quality of the portable radio you are using is vital since the internal ferrite loop antenna is the single most important factor when attempting to use electromagnetic coupling for better radio reception on the AM (Medium Wave) band. That being said, the obstacle of a metal building's 'signal-shielding' may make it impossible to receive inside some areas of the structure. {Mark • KC9TSR}

Posted on Aug 14, 2016

Re: AM reception/AM power problems

Don't take your radio to work. Get your work done , then go home and listen to it. You will get better reception in a res. area.

Posted on Oct 22, 2007

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AM reception depends on orientation of the radio. Take the radio from its handle (top side up) and rotate it until you find the best signal. If it has Automatic Tuning, take the radio outside, find the best direction and initiate the ATS. Once the stations are recorded in memory, tune to one radio and listen. If that reception is poor rotate the radio without changing the frequency on the dial.

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Keeps flashing check reception

That's because you haven't received a Required Weekly Test (RWT) for the present or past week. I just had a problem like this not to long ago. You should try unplugging the radio and taking out the batteries. Put the batteries back into the radio and plug it back in. Check to make sure your settings are still intact (you'll have to reset your time.). I'll have to check the radio this week to make sure that RWT comes in. The National Weather Service (NWS) does its Weekly Required Testing on Wednesdays between 10 a.m. & 12 p.m., I haven't had a "check reception" message scroll across the screen since everything was reset; and to enhance your confidence doing this, I actually saw a person who works on these radios, do this to my radio. As far as the weather radio going off, it really does go off when severe weather strikes, because mine just went off (my area is receiving a flash flood warning). The weather you have been receiving probably isn't "severe" enough for the NWS to sound the alarm. For more information on when and what type of event sounds the alarm, and the procedures proceeded when the alarm goes off; go to these websites:

Hope this helps!

Jun 23, 2010 | Midland WR-100 Weather/RDS Radio

2 Answers

Will I get good reception in a metal factory building I get spotty fm reception with my current radio

With old radios it worked to connect the antenna to some central radiator or (metallic) water pipe. Some old wire was used to connect it;

Feb 22, 2010 | Grundig S350 AM/FM/SW Radio

1 Answer

No radio reception in office.

most portables have a very weak FM receiver, and a building interior tends to block a good deal of signals. your best bet is an old fashioned unit with a large retractable antenna.

Jun 12, 2009 | RCA RP7887 High-Performance Super Radio

1 Answer

Radio reception problem

keep the antenna away from the metal contact.

Jan 01, 2009 | RCA RP7887 High-Performance Super Radio

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Bad reception w/ Panasonic RF-544

I solved the problem, but I did not "fix" the problem. Rather than rig an antenna to the old Panasonic RF-544 radio, I put it upstairs where it has good reception. I put the new Sony ICF-38 downstairs where it brings in the stations I listen to. The advertsizing claim for the Sony ICF-38 is that it has "Good Sound and High Sensitivity." I believe it does have "high sensitivity" because even in the basement it brings in my desired stations. (I am still curious to know if I could have rigged an antenna to the old Panasonic RF-544.) RL

Dec 07, 2008 | Panasonic RF-544 Radio

1 Answer

AM/FM stereo receiver often fully "drops" the reception of listened to radio station(s), or reception will often decrease in volume. Repositioning of the receiver's connected antenna wire often has no...

Possible solution. I have fixed two with this problem. When the radio drops to a hard surface, the ferrite coil antenna is the heaviest component on circuit board. Look for cracks in solder or broken wires where attachments to circuit board occurs for this component. Use a fine point soldering iron with low heat.

Oct 12, 2008 | Personal Radios

2 Answers

AM radio reception

You are correct William, reception is not what it used to be for many reasons. Some corporate owners and local owners have spent much more maintaining FM facilities, and many have neglected the AM's. A good part of the AM signal is via the ground radials beneath each AM tower. In time these radials deteriorate, and with it the signal. Years ago stations licensed as daytime only shut down at night. Quite a few are now allowed to stay on with greatly reduced power, adding to the noise floor at night. You also have more AM licensees now than in the 60's. Unfortunately many of the really knowledgeable AM RF engineers have retired, or are close to doing so. AM directionals require a very experienced engineer. In addition we have many Part 15 radiators, that are devices that radiate a low level RF signal. Every home is full of them, thus more interference. We have power distribution systems that generate huge amounts of noise across the band too. Then there is the issue of manufacturers who have spent more on the FM receiver side of a radio as more migrated to FM. In the 60's, very few were FM listeners. Gone is sensitivity, selectivity and frequency response in the newer AM radios. There are a few exceptions, the CC Crane, and RCA SuperRadio, both sound good with great performance. By the way, the RCA WAS the GE SuperRadio. I also like to pick up some of the vintage radios on EBay and other sites, plus occasionally at yard sales. Unless you are in the country and don't have a house full of gadgets, DX listening can be difficult, but not impossible. Best of luck,

May 27, 2008 | RCA RP7887 High-Performance Super Radio

3 Answers

Power won't stay on

Home Depot recalled all of them for this reason. Great radio, just use reachable batteries instead of the charger stand. The stand and OEM battery is the problem. I kept mine and use rechargeable's instead.

Jun 24, 2007 | Vector VEC438 AM/FM/Weather Radio

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