Question about Tamron AF 28-200mm f/3.8-5.6 Di (IF) for Canon EOS

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Repair lens front element removal

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Removing mold from inside front lense element 80-160 pentax 645 lens


Before you remove the lens element, consider this. Do you have a lens collimator and other equipment necessary to ensure proper alignment when you replace the element? If you don't, please leave lens disassembly/reassembly to a trained professional with the proper equipment.

Dec 05, 2012 | Cameras

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How do I remove the front element


YOU DON'T!!!!!!!!! By virtue of the fact that you are asking this question, it is obvious that you do not have the extensive training necessary to replace the element once it is removed.
Why do you want to remove the front element? Is it because of dirt? If so, dirt between the front elements does not usually affect picture quality.
Mechanically, lenses are very complex. If you remove one or two screws, you will find that in order to replace those screws, you will first need to remove two more. Before long, the whole lens will be fully disassembled and you will not be able to put it back together. A qualified camera repair man will charge you double what it would have cost if you had not tampered with it yourself.

Jun 27, 2012 | Nikon 24mm f/2 Nikkor AIS Lens

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Please Help. I have a Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR DX. I occasionally remove the front lens element assembly to clean the inner lens element as it gets dusty. The front lens element assembly...


Hi,IF I were you I will search the eBay for a same lens as " parts only " which means lens does not work but you can use the some parts of it ..There are a lot on ebay..one example is below URL..pls visit both..
Brand name services always do this..Since you were doing unauthorized repair ,they do not like it..
Hope this helps! Take care and please Remember to rate/vote and
give me 4 Thumbs Up for me to continue for Helping out the Community :)
Thanks

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Item condition:For parts or not working

http://cgi.ebay.com/Nikon-Nikkor-18-200mm-ED-AF-S-3-5-5-6-READ-/200635517251?pt=Camera_Lenses&hash=item2eb6cf0943
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parts;
http://photography.shop.ebay.com/Lenses-/3323/i.html?_kw=Nikon&_kw=parts&_dmpt=Camera_Lenses&_stpos=&gbr=1

Jul 29, 2011 | Nikon Zoom-Nikkor 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G...

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I have quite a lot of fungus inside my sigma mirror ultra lens, the front lenses were easy to get out and polish but I am concerned about dismantling the smaller rear lenses. Are there any complications to...


Holy Smokes, well if I were you right now I'd put it back together and send it to Sigma for repair cause you dismantle a lens like that there is no way you are going to align those lens elements without the proper equipment.

Using anything more then lens cleaner for camera optics will in fact remove the coating from the lens.

What you have isn't like the lenses from a "View" camera where it was possible to remove one lens group and replace with another but, those lenses were made and used 70 years ago.

Lens technology has changed a bit since then.

I had a manual focus Nikon F2.8 lens one time that had a coating separation on the front element that caused some wicked flare. I took eye glass cleaner and Windex to it to remove the rest of the coating so I could continue the shoot. I then sent the lens to Nikon for repair.

Best of luck with that one

Apr 27, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Permanent smudge or scratch in coating of front element. Price of a new element? Is the element able to be re-coated?


Re-coating is not usually possible and will cost more than a new lens element.

The front element is one of the most expensive parts of the entire lens so replacement is often not cost effective. Fitting it and ensuring correct optical alignment is not a DIY job.

The real question is whether the marking is readily visible in the images and if so whether it's a minor artefact which can be edited out? If so, then repairs to the lens are simply not worth doing.

Jun 15, 2010 | Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L USM Ultra Wide-Angle...

1 Answer

Side out of image


I'm assuming in what follows that you've tried other lenses and only get the problem with this one lens. If you haven't, then it's essential to do this first unless the lens is obviously the problem. If it happens with other lenses then you have a damaged image sensor mounting within the camera body which will need professional attention.

This is a common problem on this particular lens. Normally it's due to the front element of the lens being slightly skewed on the lens barrel and most commonly occurs after the lens has been dropped.

Turn your lens to manual focus and focus to the shortest distance. Set the lens upright on a table and carefully view all around, if the problem is the front element it will lean slightly to one side like a miniature leaning tower of Pisa. If it doesn't, then check again with greater precision using a ruler to measure the distance s between the lens barrel and the focussing ring and a number of opposite points around the circumference. If they're anything but identical then the lens is skewed. If they are identical then the skewed element is buried deep inside the lens and will need professional repair as it's most likely a fault with the moving element used for image stabilisation.

If the tests confirm that the front element is skewed then if you're really careful and lucky you can often jiggle the front element using a firm twisting action back into place. It does take a bit of judiciously applied brute force and if unsuccessful you can make the problem worse, but either way if you don't try then the lens needs professional repair and new internal parts.

I've had this problem on about one of these lenses every month or so for the last year. The brute force repair works in about half the lenses I try it on and normally lasts. On the others a strip down repair usually shows the same range of broken/worn parts as I find on those lenses which clearly are too far gone to attempt the brute force method.

The difference is cost: the brute force repair costs nothing. The proper repair is often economically unviable as it often costs 50% to 70% of the cost of a brand new lens with a warranty.

Sep 05, 2009 | Canon 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 EF IS USM AF Lens

1 Answer

Dirt inside back lens element


The dirt has gotten onto the front element of the rear lens group. You do not want to try partially disassembling the lens to clean it. Either Tamron or a good camera lens repair technician should be able to perform what is called a partial internal CLA (cleaning, lubrication and adjustment) of just rear portions of the lens for fairly cheap. Alternatively you may be able to pick up a used Tamron 28-200 in excellent condition for less than the repair cost of your current lens. If successful, then you could turn around and sell your 28-200 for parts or sell it to someone who knows how to service it.

Aug 10, 2009 | Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DI XR for Canon

2 Answers

Canon 50mm f3.5 Macro Lens// nFD version 1980 Haze behind first element


Haze is condensation. I am schooled in optics and physics. Seriously, if you go to a local pawn shop they will verify what I say. Mold in the lens optics will follow. I would gladly send you a lens if you are destitute but do not throw bad money (time) after good. Steve Medley

Jan 12, 2009 | Cameras

2 Answers

How to get the lens apart to clear bits on the front element


The front element is easy to remove.
There's a plastic cover on the front of the lens which has a very small hole in it.
Get something like a very small screwdriver in that hole and prize the cover off.
Remove the 3 screws in the next plastic cover and remove it.
The next 3 screws you see hold the front lens element on.
This whole part rotates to adjust the infinity focus and is kept in position by those 3 screws.
Make sure you mark the position by maybe making a small scratch in the plastic next to one of the screws.
Or maybe scratch around one of the screws.
With those 3 screws removed the front element with the lens just falls out.

Aug 27, 2008 | Tamron 18-250mm F/3.5-6.3 AF Di-II LD...

1 Answer

Lens error


The most common cause of this issue on the L3 is an impact which dislodges the focus element in the very front of the lens. The metal platform that the focus system is mounted to is attached with 1 screw and is able to flex slightly under stress. When impacted it flexes and allows the focus drive to become misaligned. The lens still technically works but the camera senses that the focus is jammed and leaves the lens extended so no components will be damaged by retracting. This repair costs $145 at my shop, not an economical repair for this camera. Some parts of the focus element are accessable from the front of the lens. You can remove the metal cover (it is glued down). Generally you will not be able to re-install the lens barrier, but it can be removed without harm to the camera. When you remove the plastic plate which carries the lens barrier you will see a small metal gear, this is the base of the focus drive.

Jun 13, 2007 | Nikon COOLPIX L3 Digital Camera

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