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Winchester 190, 290: Cocking Handle - Optics

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I have a hatsun 1000s air rile and when I **** it the swivel arm at the bottom drops down.I have to hold it up to **** the rifle.what is worn as it is fairly new


There may be an adjustable linkage on the cocking arm. Look for a nut (similar to a turnbuckle). I have an RWS model 48 that a side cocking handle. The linkage on the handle has a nut to adjust it.

Jan 25, 2017 | Miscellaneous

1 Answer

Anything you can tell me about Winchester Model 97 Ser# 201413. when it was made and value.


The Winchester Model 1897 evolved from the Winchester Model 1893. The Model 1897 and 1893 were both designed by John Browning. The Model 1897 is an external hammer shotgun lacking a trigger disconnector. This means that the user can hold the trigger down while cycling the shotgun and once the action is returned to battery the gun fires. The gun itself is classified as a slide action pump shotgun. It was the first truly successful pump-action shotgun produced. Throughout the time period the Model 1897 was in production, over a million of the type were produced in various grades and barrel lengths. 16-gauge guns had a standard barrel length of 28 inches, while 12-gauge guns were furnished with 30-inch length barrels. Special length barrels could be ordered in lengths as short as 20 inches, and as long as 36 inches. Along with various grades and barrel lengths, the Model 1897 came in two different chamberings. One was the 12 gauge and the other was the 16 gauge. The shells should be of the 2-¾ inch or 2-? inch model. Any shells larger are not recommended. An average Model 1897 held 5 shotgun shells in the magazine tube. After including the one shell that could be held in the chamber, the average Model 1897 held a total of 6 shotgun shells. However, this would vary from grade to grade. When working the action of the Model 1897 the forend (fore grip) is pulled back, forcing the breech bolt to the rear which extracts and then ejects the spent shell while simultaneously cocking the external hammer by pushing it to the rear. When the forend is slid forward again, the breech bolt pushes a fresh shell into the gun's chamber and locks into place. This action of sliding the forend back and forth (pumping) is why the gun is classified as a slide action (or pump) gun.

Oct 23, 2016 | Winchester Optics

1 Answer

No more buzzer warning sounds


Cocking time ? Cocking what ?

Dec 01, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

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Daisy replacement parts


ebay is your friend

Aug 22, 2014 | Photography

1 Answer

.308 cal rifle side view#2


It's a Swiss Schmidt-Rubin.

The ring (instead of a cocking knob) at the rear of the bolt, the bolt handle, and the magazine give it away.

It's a straight-pull bolt (the bolt pulls straight back, instead of the more common turn-bolt, that requires the bolt to be rotated before pulling back).

Aug 12, 2014 | Optics

1 Answer

Have a winchester 1906 pump .22lr, when the bolt is pumped back to cock the hammer, the hammer falls as the bolt is going back to battery. Now if I pull the hammer back to cock and then run the bolt the...


The cocking mechanism is not pushing the bolt back far enough to reach the purchase point of the hammer. I do not know if that model has any way to adjust the range of bolt travel, but it could likely be worn metal just barely falling short of the mark.

Can you find any noticable play in any parts between the cocking mechanism and the bolt?

Have you tried pushing the bolt itself back (inserting something in front of the bolt and push back) to see if you can make the hammer catch in that manner, to narrow the problem down to just the cocking mechanism?

You may need to have a reputable gunsmith look at it, which would also be much safer than trying to repair it yourself, as well as safer than trying to use it while in this unreliable state. If the hammer toches a round just a little too hard before locked in fully chambered position, you could blow out the extractor pin or even worse, as I'm sure you could imagine.

Oct 14, 2013 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

1 Answer

Diagram of a model 70 bolt- how to take the bolt apart to change firing pin


Compress the spring. Remove the C Clip. Remove the spring. Remove the firing pin & cocking piece from the shroud. Drive out the retaining pin in the cocking piece. Unscrew the pin. Reinstall in reverse order.

Oct 26, 2012 | Winchester Optics

1 Answer

Bought a brand new winchester 101 over and under shot less than 2 boxes of shells now only one barrel will fire it will not **** the hammer on both barrells i am a very careful person and the gun is very...


Should not be happening, as both hammers should be cocked as the receiver is closed.
I would disassemble and reassemble the shotgun barrel to receiver.
Here is a link to the owner's manual:
http://media.winchesterguns.com/pdf/om/06_361_select.pdf
Perhaps when disassembled, you will discover a cocking rod is binding, bent, or something. I really can't guess what it could be.

Nov 01, 2010 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

1 Answer

Cocking a winchester m12


you need to push that slide release unless you have pulled the trigger. If you pulled the trigger it will then release the slide. This is there so you don't accidently ejeat an unfired shell

Jan 24, 2010 | Winchester (026196062448) (20 - 60x70 mm)

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