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100294 cylinder seal CN 31425 exhaust valve bumperneed parts

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I'm looking to purchase a used car. I've been doing online research and saw this webpage http://www.usedcarsmells.com . They talk about exhaust color and smells. Is it true that you could tell a lot about...


Yes this is correct, you can get important information from the colour of smoke from the exhaust:

Blue/Gray Smoke: Blue/gray exhaust smoke is an indication of oil burning in the combustion chamber. These are possible symptoms and causes:
Valve Seals: Leaking valve seals will cause blue/gray smoke at startup because oil leaks past the seals into the cylinder after the engine shuts down.
Valve Guides: Excessive clearance between the valve stem and the valve guide allows oil to leak past the gap into the cylinder.
Piston Rings: Worn or damaged piston rings will cause blow-by resulting in blue/gray smoke.
Worn Cylinder Walls: Worn cylinder walls cause blow-by resulting in blue/gray smoke.
PCV System: A stuck closed PCV valve will cause excessive crankcase pressure resulting in blue/gray smoke.
Black Smoke: Black exhaust smoke is an indication of a rich fuel condition. These are possible causes:
Fuel Injectors: A leaking or dripping fuel injector will cause a rich fuel condition.
Fuel Pressure Regulator: A stuck closed fuel pressure regulator will cause a rich fuel condition.
Fuel Return: A restricted fuel return line will cause a rich fuel condition.
White/Gray Smoke: White exhaust smoke is an indication that coolant is burning in the combustion chamber. These are possible causes:
Cylinder Head: A crack in the cylinder head (around the coolant jacket) will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber.
Engine Block: A crack in the deck of an engine block near the coolant jacket will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber.
Head Gasket: A damaged or blown head gasket will cause coolant to enter the combustion chamber resulting in white/gray smoke coming from the tailpipe.

Jan 17, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Why is my 2000 kia sephia blowing blue smoke from the tailpipe. it has 86,000 miles. the check oil warning light is on even though the dipstick reads full.


The most common cause of blue exhaust smoke is oil leaking past engine seals and into the cylinders where it then mixes and burns with the fuel. This is most frequently seen in older or high mileage cars with worn seals and gaskets. It only requires a very small amount of oil leaking into the cylinders to cause excessive blue exhaust smoke.

Blue exhaust smoke only at start-up can indicate worn piston seals or damaged or worn valve guides which may also cause a rattling noise. An external engine oil leak can drip onto hot engine and exhaust parts causing what appears to be blue exhaust smoke. Other possible causes of blue exhaust smoke include: piston wear, worn valve seals, a dirty or non-functioning PCV valve, worn piston rings, an intake manifold gasket leak, worn engine oil seals and possibly even head gasket failure.

Oil leaking into the cylinders can cause a rough idle, misfire and fouled spark plugs. In addition, a reduction in power and oil loss can be indicators that the blue exhaust smoke is caused by an internal engine oil leak. Internal engine oil leaks can also allow fuel to mix with the oil in the crankcase which will degrade the oil and prevent it from adequately protecting the engine.

Operating a car with a severely dirty oil filter, air filter or improperly functioning PCV valve can also sometimes result in engine oil blow-by, oil loss and blue exhaust smoke. Periodically checking the engine oil level with the oil dip stick will indicate if there is excessive oil consumption. Higher viscosity engine oil can sometimes temporarily reduce the amount of blow-by; however, this is not generally recommended. Excessive blue exhaust smoke indicates a possible internal engine oil leak that should be inspected by an ASE certified mechanic.

Dec 08, 2014 | 2000 Kia Sephia

1 Answer

I have a TMX 155 bike,but so much smoke out of the exhaust


Is your cylinder block been rebore from standard to 0.25? Did you used genuine Honda Parts? Honda's are very fussy on parts and cost more when you buy genuine parts. Recheck the cylinder block if there is excessive scouring marks in the bore and make sure it bored properly by a trusted machinist. Check the valve guides as well and replace the valve seals again if necessary.

Dec 29, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Air leaking/cn-350b


Usually caused by poppet seal # cn-220-3. Poppet seal will crack and not seal fully. New seal must be heated to install or you could crack it. I use heat gun or hair dryer. Examine old seal for proper orientation of taper. Good luck with your repair

Sep 19, 2012 | Air Tools & Compressors

1 Answer

Mastercraft framing nailer


Most likely a bad head valve o-ring or seal where the head valve seals to the cylinder. Could be a few other things too like a worn head casting but not near as common. I have no idea where you would get parts for it.

May 18, 2012 | Air Tools & Compressors

1 Answer

Pw80 oil coming out the exhaust


Hi, Anonymous and the usual suspects are:
1. Engine oil over filled.
2. Piston rings worn past service specs.
3. Broken piston rings.
4. Piston pin retaining clip failure.
5. Cracked piston.
6. Broken piston ring lands.
7. Hole in the piston.
8. Valve/guide clearance worn past service specs.
9. Worn out valve seals.
10. Crushed or loose valve seal.
11. Gouges in cylinder walls.
12. Cracked cylinder or head.
13. Blown head gasket.
14. Crankcase breather blocked or hose pinched.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
HELP have oil coming out of my PW80 Exhaust
Excess oil out exhaust pipe
YAMAHA PW80 Owner Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA PW80 Owner Manual

Apr 20, 2012 | 2004 Yamaha PW 80

1 Answer

My hitach nr83a just blows air out the exhaust when pluged in and wont shoot. is this a trigger or exhaust problem ???


Your problem is most likely where the cylinder / head come together. In the Hitachi framers, the cylinder is designed to move up and down (unlike Bostitch where the head valve moves) so if the O-rings are dirty or broken, or the spring under the cylinder is broken - the cylinder won't make a good seal to the head valve.
You can try plugging the tool in and giving a couple of firm taps straight down on the head with a rubber mallet - if the leak stops or slows you'll know the problem is with the cylinder movement.
Check the head valve seal - often they get sand / debris embedded in them which prevents the cylinder from making a good seal.
It is rare for a Hitachi trigger to be a problem.

Nov 24, 2011 | Hitachi Nr83a- Strip Nailer-driver Blade...

1 Answer

1985 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing oil in my exhaust pipe what is the problem?


Hi, Rudy and the usual suspects are:
1. Engine oil over filled.
2. Piston rings worn past service specs.
3. Broken piston rings.
4. Piston pin retaining clip failure.
5. Cracked piston.
6. Broken piston ring lands.
7. Hole in the piston.
8. Valve/guide clearance worn past service specs.
9. Worn out valve seals.
10. Crushed or loose valve seal.
11. Gouges in cylinder walls.
12. Cracked cylinder or head.
13. Blown head gasket.
14. Crankcase breather blocked or hose pinched.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
heavy white smoke from exhaust GL1200 Information Questions goldwingdocs...
1986 GL1200 Oil in exhaust
Honda GL1200D Shop Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda GL1200 1986 Owner Manual

Oct 03, 2011 | 1985 Honda GL 1200 Aspencade Gold Wing

1 Answer

2003 Honda CR 250 R oil leaking front of the exhaust pipe


Hi, Anonymous and the usual suspects are:
1. Engine oil over filled.
2. Piston rings worn past service specs.
3. Broken piston rings.
4. Piston pin retaining clip failure.
5. Cracked piston.
6. Broken piston ring lands.
7. Hole in the piston.
8. Valve/guide clearance worn past service specs.
9. Worn out valve seals.
10. Crushed or loose valve seal.
11. Gouges in cylinder walls.
12. Cracked cylinder or head.
13. Blown head gasket.
14. Crankcase breather blocked or hose pinched.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2003 cr250r exhaust leak at exhaust port
Need help trying to reduce excess spoge 2002 CR250R
CR250 2002 2003 pdf
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda CR250R Owner Manual Competition Handbook

May 20, 2010 | 2003 Honda CR 250 R

1 Answer

Oil on sprark plugs


  1. Disconnect the negative battery terminal.
  2. Remove the valve cover, using the proper procedures.
  3. Remove the camshaft, shims and rockers, if equipped, using the proper procedures.
  4. Remove the spark plugs.
  5. Rotate the engine to Top Dead Center (TDC) for each cylinder's seals that are being replaced; e.g., if replacing the No. 2 cylinder valve seals, have the No. 2 cylinder at TDC. Use a coat hanger put down into the cylinder to determine when it is at TDC.
  6. Attach a fixture at the flywheel or the front of the engine to prevent the engine from rotating. Make sure the fixture damages no components.
  7. Thread an adapter into the spark plug holes that can be hooked up to a shop compressor air hose.
  8. Apply 90 psi of shop compressor air to the adapter hose. This is done to keep the valves from dropping down into the cylinder when the valve springs are removed.
CAUTIONTo avoid personal injury, wear eye and ear protection. Keep hands and clothing away from engine parts that rotate, in case the engine does rotate from the cylinder air pressure.
  1. With the cylinder under pressure, remove the valve spring retainer and the spring, using a spring compressor tool. Hitting the spring retainer with a soft hammer may help loosen the valve keepers, if the keeper will not move downward when trying to compress the spring.
  2. With the valve spring removed, remove the oil seal.
To Install:
  1. Install a new seal, using Toyota Special Service Tool (SST) 09201-41020, or equivalent.
  2. Reinstall the valve springs (See Valves).
  3. Release the air pressure and reverse the removal procedures to complete installation.
  4. Connect the negative battery terminal, start the engine and check for leaks.
0900c15280046373.jpgFig. 1 Removing the valve sealsCelica 0900c15280046378.jpgFig. 2 Intake and exhaust valve sealsCelica 0900c15280046379.jpgFig. 3 Installing the valve sealsCelicaWith Cylinder Head Off Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery terminal.
  2. Remove the cylinder head, using the proper procedures.
  3. Remove the valve and spring (See Valves).
  4. Remove the oil seal.
To Install:
  1. Install a new seal, using Toyota Special Service Tool (SST) 09201-41020, or equivalent.
  2. Reinstall the removed components to complete installation.
  3. Connect the negative battery terminal, start the engine and check for leaks.

Aug 25, 2008 | 1990 Toyota Celica

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