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Oil in air

Starts ok runs on idle press load switch and an oils mist starts coming out of the air outlet

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Oil or water ??? oil could be compressor is going bad or overfull

Posted on Dec 30, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Gates air compressor with a honda motor, electric start, with oil alert.

Found & repaired internally broken wire.

Posted on Nov 07, 2008

rayname
  • 70 Answers

SOURCE: Air compressor/ alot of air is coming out of the oil cap vent.

this could be blow back possibly bad piston rings you may need new rings oil chamber is usually at intake pressure unit may need rebuild

Posted on Jan 24, 2009

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SOURCE: Have Atlas copco GA7-FF compressor. RUnning very hot burning belts

kindly call on 9911550076

Posted on May 16, 2013

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2009 ultra classic oil coming from carberator


Hi Jesse, oil leaking from your air cleaner is caused by oil carryover from the engine. For what ever reason the breather system is not seperating enough oil mist and air from the piston downstroke. There are cheap and quick easy fixes and there are more exspensive ones. Start by trying the following:
1. Run your oil level half way between the add and full mark when hot.
2. Run oil breather lines from head into a TEE fitting below carb/induction module then a single line into a mini filter under frame.
3. Purchase Arlen Ness Super Sucker.
4. Replace umbrella valves and realign oil pump
5. Upgrade oil pump and cam plate
Good luck

Apr 20, 2013 | 2009 Harley Davidson FLHTCU Ultra Classic...

1 Answer

Oil coming out of air filter in y 2002 harley


Hi Anonymous, oil leaking from your air cleaner is caused by oil carryover from the engine. For what ever reason the breather system is not seperating enough oil mist and air from the piston downstroke. There are cheap and quick easy fixes and there are more exspensive ones. Start by trying the following:
1. Run your oil level half way between the add and full mark when hot.
2. Run oil breather lines from head into a TEE fitting below carb/induction module then a single line into a mini filter under frame.
3. Purchase Arlen Ness Super Sucker.
4. Replace umbrella valves and realign oil pump
5. Upgrade oil pump and cam plate
Good luck

Apr 06, 2013 | Harley Davidson FXSTB Night Train...

2 Answers

Oil in air cleaner !?!?!


Does it smoke at all? It's possible that you have either added to much oil, or you have worn pistol rings and the oil is slipping past the pistons and being forced into your breather.

Nov 03, 2012 | 1991 Suzuki VX 800

1 Answer

Oil coming out of crankcase air breather 1966 electra glide


Hi Anonymous, oil leaking from your air cleaner is caused by oil carryover from the engine. For what ever reason the breather system is not seperating enough oil mist and air from the piston downstroke. There are cheap and quick easy fixes and there are more exspensive ones. Start by trying the following:
1. Run your oil level half way between the add and full mark when hot.
2. Run oil breather lines from head into a TEE fitting below carb/induction module then a single line into a mini filter under frame.
3. Purchase Arlen Ness Super Sucker.
4. Replace umbrella valves and realign oil pump
5. Upgrade oil pump and cam plate
Good luck

Aug 31, 2012 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Why is oil coming out of the air cleaner


Hi Anonymous, oil leaking from your air cleaner is caused by oil carryover from the engine. For what ever reason the breather system is not seperating enough oil mist and air from the piston downstroke. There are cheap and quick easy fixes and there are more exspensive ones. Start by trying the following:
1. Run your oil level half way between the add and full mark when hot.
2. Run oil breather lines from head into a TEE fitting below carb/induction module then a single line into a mini filter under frame.
3. Purchase Arlen Ness Super Sucker.
4. Replace umbrella valves and realign oil pump
5. Upgrade oil pump and cam plate
Good luck

Jul 09, 2012 | 2001 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

2 Answers

I have a 7-41 I.R. compressor. Recently serviced with 1200 hrs done. It now only runs for about 20 mins before shutting down. After 15 mins she starts again. I have tried bypassing water temp sender and...


make sure the cooler(s) are clean. Next check the airend discharge temperature switch commonly called a HAT (High Air Temp) switch. These switches will reset as the compressor cools down. I would be able to access the switch quickly. Run unit until shutdown remove wires and see if switch is open. if open you found your problem

Jun 01, 2011 | Ingersoll Air Tools & Compressors

1 Answer

How much oil does it take? When do you add more? What happens if you over fill oil?


You add more when the level on the oil dipstick falls to–or below the “add” mark. At that point, add one quart.

The crankshaft of an engine, which is the main shaft that both drives the car, and that comes out of the front of the engine and has all the drive belts on it — the lowest spinning part. As it spins inside the engine, it whips the air inside the engine around. This whipped air is called windage.

If you overfill the engine with oil, the windage will start to whip the top surface of the oil, like waves on a body of water in the wind. If the oil level is close enough to the crankshaft, or the engine is spinning fast enough, the windage will tear drops of oil off the surface of the oil, and fling them around the inside of the engine. This can lead to a lot of oil on the cylinder walls, and therefore excessive oil consumption from the rings being unable to scrape away all that oil. Plus, this puts an oil mist in the air inside the engine. That oil mist will get sucked up by the Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) system, leading to smokey exhaust, possible catalytic converter failure, and excessive oil consumption.

At this oil level the following can happen, but it is more likely with the oil level described.

It the oil level is high enough that the crankshaft actually is in the oil, the spinning of the crankshaft will directly splatter oil around inside the engine. This will froth the oil into foam, filling the airspace of the engine even more while it is running than it was at rest. This places a physical load on the crankshaft, possibly preventing the engine from idling, but certainly reducing mileage. The PCV system will probably start to pick up either liquid oil or oil foam. The PCV system has a vacuum hose and valve on one side of the engine, and an air supply on the other side, coming from the air filter. When the PCV system picks up liquid oil, the engine will receive a lot of oil, causing smoking and excessive oil consumption, but the passageway will be partially blocked as well. The exhaust gasses that get past the rings must go somewhere, and so air will go out of the crankcase air inlet. This air flow will take oil mist or liquid oil with it, and will put oil on the air filter, blocking the flow of combustion air a little (or a lot). Some of that oil will also be taken into the engine along with the combustion air, increasing the oil consumption of the engine, smoke in the exhaust, and possibly harming the catalytic converter.

Additionally, the seals at the ends of the crankshaft where it comes out of the front and rear of the engine are designed to control oil that is splattered onto the crankshaft, not the kinds of gushing oil described here, and they are not designed to work where there is pressure inside the crankcase, such as will happen if the PCV inlets and outlets get clogged with oil. Both the high volume of oil in the region of the crankshaft seals, and the possily elevated pressure can caus the seals to either be damaged, or possibluy only to allow exessive oil to escape. If the car has a manual transmission, that can put oil on the clutch necessitating replacing it. At the front of the engine, oil escaping can lubricate the timing belt if there is one, causing it to slip, and that causing the valve timing to be wrong, and that causing the valves and pistons to come into destructive contact.

Additionally, the drive belts (whether V belts or a serpentine belt) to slip, impairing battery charging, cooling (if the water pump slows down) and difficult steering (if the power steering pump slow down too much).

Now, it is true that some oil runs into the crankshaft and gets splattered around during hard acceleration or braking with a front-to-rear mounted engine, or hard cornering with a transverse mounted engine, so splattering oil around through direct contact with the spinning crankshaft is not automatically the death knell of engines, or our normal driving would cause all these things I have described. But it is a question of the amount. Some oil splattering around is normal under that kind of driving. But you cannot spend your whole trip speeding up, and you can;t spend your whole trip slowing down. You don't drive hard cornering all the time either. By the way, racing engines either do not carry the oil at the bottom of the engine, or they have additional sheet metal put into the oil pan to control the sloshing oil. Some race cars **** any oil that falls to the bottom of the engine out right away, and store it in a tank that is not part of the engine. This is called a dry-sump oil system.

But, since we don't drive in a way that sloshes the oil around all the time, but spend a good part of the trip driving at a steady speed in a relatively straight line, that amount of sloshing is not excessive enough to cause significant problems.

This was a fun question to ponder — thanks!

Jun 26, 2010 | 2000 Kia Sephia

2 Answers

Oil blowing out throttle body on filter and blowing down the side of bike. I had a new crankcase breather valve kit installed one month ago. It was fine until two days ago. All o-rings were replaced also.


The oil may not be coming out of the throttle body. The crankcase breather system is actually in the rocker box covers. Yes, there is a breather gear in the crankcase but that is for the oil return to the oil pump.

The crankcase ventilation system vents crankcase pressure into the air cleaner as required by the EPA. The purpose is to route oil mist contained in the crankcase ari that is vented into the engine to be burned. There are 'umbrella valves" in the center section of the rocker boxes. Over time, the heat makes these pieces get hard and brittle since they are made of a type of rubber. When this happens, they don't stop the oil mist as well as they used to. The oil mist is blown into the air filter where it coaleses into drops of oil. This is normal for any Harley due to their engine design.

But, if it's too bad, I'd suggest replacing the umbrella valves. Simply remove the top and center section of the rocker boxes by removing the six bolts that hold the parts on the top of each cylinder. Replace the umbrella and the edge gaskets and replace the covers. Torque the bolts to 10-13 foot pounds.

Good Luck
Steve

Jun 21, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Oil press stop car


Change the oil pressure switch but what is the engine mileage,condition and servicing.Is it a siezing oil pump leading to a siezed engine.Start the car and remove the oil cap, a mist or spray of oil may come out indicating the pump is okay so to speak and on steady idle may blow more out.If thats the case then it may be the switch only but given the age and possibly a high miler it may be the oil pump and bearing in mind these cars had oil trouble from new because of wrong oil grade being used in the factory and the specification being changed from standard oil to part or fully synthetic to prevent standard oil turning too a greasy paste like substance that led to siezed new engines after a year or 2.

Feb 01, 2010 | 2003 Volkswagen Passat

1 Answer

Hard starting,may run ok until it gets warmed up,ticking,backfire


either bad head gaskets,oil pump is bad,start with simple things change oil & filter start car listen to see if you have an air leak around intake and or heads hook an oil compression tester up and see if oil is pumping properly if not could be a faulty oil pump

Oct 23, 2009 | 1999 Chevrolet K2500

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