Question about Canon Elph2 APS Point and Shoot Camera

1 Answer

Background hue for poloroid miniportrait passport camera

We use a solid white background behind subject, but the pictures show a green hue in the background. Is there a way to correct this? We did change the batteries and it helped, but doesn't completely correct it.

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.


    An expert that hasĀ over 10 points.


    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 2 times.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 8 Answers
Re: background hue for poloroid miniportrait passport...

That white background is likely picking up greenish light from some nearby source - a wall, a bank of trees outside the window, a rug? Look around and you may find the culprit. Then, you can pull curtains, wait for the leaves to fall, use a flash or other lighting, etc. Your eye makes the correction automatically, so you won't notice this distortion till you make a point of looking for it - or seeing your photos as they are. You may be able to fix this problem by adjusting the color balance in your camera - I'm assuming you're shooting digital. My digital camera, for instance, offers a Warm color balance setting, which emphasizes the redder end of the spectrum. You may be able to go further than that and adjust the balance to your own exact liking. Or, later, with the photos in the computer, your ediing program (iPhoto, say) may be able to apply a fix. If the pix are critical and you get only once chance to make them, you should fiddle with these different options and find the right setting(s) and lighting setup and then, and only then, go for your actual photos. The whole goal in photography, whether its silver or digital, is to eliminate variables and make the process repeatable. Then, you can adjust variables one by one and know, pretty much, what the results will be. The other goal, somewhat related, is to essentially forget about your camera and about its settings - about the very fact that it's in your hand and in front of your face - and just start to See the world as it is. Like that Zen archer and his arrow. That's another story for another time, but now that you know this, grasshopper, you will never forget it and it will make itself incredibly useful to you when the time comes. Trust in it. Now, go make art.

Posted on Oct 02, 2007

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

My w6x-20110504_1 is taking pictures but when i pull them up it is showing all white and no way of seeing my picture how can i fix it

Probably your exposure (aperture and shutter speed) settings is very high - resulting in over-exposed shots. Try taking few shots with different subjects and backgrounds with auto-focus and see if you can view them.

Aug 20, 2014 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

When taking a picture in daylight and the background is bright the background comes out as white-no colour. I've tried fill in flash and also exposure compensation to no avail. Very frustrating-please...

Your camera is setting its exposure to your subject, which if it's darker than the background will cause the background to over expose. You need to set the exposure to the background which then will cause your background to be properly exposed and your foreground or subject to be darker. With a point n shoot camera, accomplishing this might be a difficult task. But if you expose to the background and use the fill flash, you should then get your properly exposed image.

Jun 04, 2014 | Nikon COOLPIX S5100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hello, I would like my pictures to have a white background. When I take the picture on a white background the background ends up looking gray. I am taking pictures of baby clothing and I want the clothing...

Exposure meters are designed on the premise that the scene is an average, middle gray, in brightness. If you take a picture of a white dog playing in the snow, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray dog playing in gray snow). If you take a picture of a black cat sitting on black asphalt, the camera will try to make the picture come out middle gray (a gray cat sitting on gray ground).

If the white background is dominating the scene, the camera will reduce exposure to try to make the entire scene come out middle gray. The solution is to meter on something else. Move in close and fill the frame with the subject, press the AE-LOCK button, then move back, compose the picture, and take the shot. For full details, refer to the "Shooting with the exposure locked --- AE-LOCK" section in the manual (page 52 in my copy).

If you're taking a lot of pictures, you might want to switch to Manual mode and set the exposure accordingly.

Dec 29, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F717 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Well i was wondering how i could get a bokeh effect behind a subject? does anyone know? is it possible to do this without a filter?

hello! Yes, you can since the Coolpix L100 has a 15X telephoto lens, you can use the second method described below.
Bokeh is a photographic term used to describe a lens effect wherein the background of the photo is out of focus. This effect is used to blur out distracting backgrounds and give emphasis to the the primary subject of the photo.There are two ways to get bokeh when taking pictures. The first is by using a very large aperture to get a shallow depth of field. You can set your camera’s aperture to f/5 or below. This will effectively throw everything behind your subject out of focus. You can also blur out the background of your photo by using a long telephoto lens. There is no hard rule on how long your lens should be but the longer its reach, the more pronounced the bokeh is going to be.

Dec 25, 2009 | Nikon COOLPIX L100 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Rejected passport pictures

The marks are probably a result of the chemical process that occurs to make the image appear on the Polaroid paper. While not visible to the naked eye, the process of scanning that the consulate is using is able to detect more than what is merely visible on the picture. This added detected "information" is showing up on the scan output, rendering it unusable.

You will probably not be able to submit an acceptable picture on any Polaroid instant film paper to the consulate for this reason. Most photography studios off instant passport pictures for about $10 - $20. AAA used to offer a deal of this, but it's been a long time since I needed a passport picture, but check with them first if you are a member. Just make sure you can get a picture that meets the technical requirements (size, color, etc.) of the consulate before having the picture(s) taken.

Sep 30, 2009 | Polaroid Digital MiniPortrait Digital...

1 Answer

Background is overexposed

So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

2 Answers

Blue Hue

On a digicam, autofocus works by looking for areas of contrast in the image you are framing. So if you are taking a picture of people (who usually have little contrast) and there is something in the frame (such as a building in the background) with more contrast or sharper definition, the autofocus may focus on that item and not your subject. Knowing this, your job is to work with your camera's modus operandi to get the shot you want. One way is to zoom in, lock the focus on your subject (by pressing the shutter button halfway down) and, while still half-pressing (or switching to manual focus if you have that option), zoom out to recompose. Sometimes you can change perspective or backgrounds to give your subject better contrast. Also, aim for areas of high contrast, such as edges.

Mar 21, 2008 | Fuji FinePix A345 Digital Camera

1 Answer


The camera uses a precise auto focus mechanism, but under the conditions and with the subjects described below the auto focus function may not work well. Subjects moving at high speed Very shiny subjects such as a mirror or car body Extremely low contrast subjects (such as subjects dressed in the same color as the background, etc.) When there are objects in front of or behind the subject (such as an animal in a cage or a person in front of a tree) Subjects with little reflection, such as hair or fur Subjects with no solidity, such as smoke or flames Subjects viewed through glass In addition, the focus is set on the center of the frame, so if the subject is not at the center (when shooting two people standing side by side, for example), the focus is adjusted on the background and the desired subject (the two people) may be out of focus. In such cases, do the following: Point the camera so that one of the persons is at the center of the viewfinder. Half-press the shutter button. (The focus is locked on the person.) Holding the shutter button in the half-pressed position, reposition the camera to achieve the desired composition. Take the photo. If the focus cannot be adjusted, it is locked to infinity (1.5 meters when using the flash).

Sep 11, 2005 | Toshiba Sora PDR-T10 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Exposure control options

The following exposure options are available: P (Program auto), A (Aperture priority), S (Shutter priority), and M (Manual). There are five scene programs modes available in which the camera will choose the optimal settings for the picture: - Landscape + Portrait: Suitable for taking photos of both you subject and background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. - Landscape: Suitable for taking photos of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. Both the foreground and the background are in focus. Since blues and greens are reproduced vividly in this mode, the landscape mode is excellent for shooting natural scenery. - Portrait: Suitable for shooting a portrait-style image of a person. This mode features an in-focus subject against a blurred background. - Sports: Suitable for capturing fast-moving action such as sports scene or moving vehicles without blurring. - Night scene: Suitable for taking night scene photos with a slower shutter speed.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-5060 Wide Zoom Digital...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Canon Elph2 APS Point and Shoot Camera Logo

75 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Canon Digital Cameras Experts


Level 2 Expert

246 Answers


Level 3 Expert

2598 Answers


Level 2 Expert

68 Answers

Are you a Canon Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides