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Sata, ide i have 2 sata hard drives and 1 ide hard drive. how can i run all 3 and boot from 1 of the sata drives?

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Re: sata, ide

Update: SATA II drives do have jumpers to make them backwards compatible with 1.5 Gb/s (SATA II drives are 3.0 Gb/s). So if your system is older and can only handle SATA (first Gen) then you have to add a jumper (Seagate has the jumper setting on the drive but sometimes supplies no jumper i.e. you have to have your own).

Posted on May 20, 2010

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Re: sata, ide

Ok, i had to comment on this, first off, to the person who posted before, you cannot connect a IDE connector to a SATA drive, SATA drives take SATA connectors. To introduce myself i am a highly trained computer technician. Second off, SATA drives do not have jumpers at all, period!! Ok, you should just use the two sata drives if thats what *********** board is set up for. Pluggin you your os drive in SATA connector 1 on your MB. Slave drive in SATA connector 2 on MB. Then you are good to go, Good Luck!!!

Posted on Aug 04, 2008

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Re: sata, ide

Just wondering if there is room for a third SATA drive in this machine. I looked inside, and it looks like there are only two connections. I wanted to add a third SATA drive. Any ideas how to do add a third SATA drive in the 670?

Posted on Jan 15, 2008

Re: sata, ide


Posted on Oct 01, 2007

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Re: sata, ide

First thing you turn off the power then remove the cabinet keep the first sata hard drive as master (Between Data cable & Power supply) there you have four pins from left first pin keep the jumper it is going to be as master & the second sata drive keep it as slave & the third ide hard disk you donot keep any jumpers ok.

Posted on Sep 30, 2007

Re: sata, ide

The sata hard drives do not have jumpers

Posted on Oct 03, 2007

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SOURCE: Sata , ide

Initially connect only the sata drive from which you want to boot the OS. Establish the OS successful operation from this drive. Then connect the remaining drives in conventional way or the RAID array you want to have. 

Posted on Oct 25, 2007

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I have a Windows Server 2003 system on a old Dell desktop. I want to move it (hard drives) to a Systemax Venture.

You need an IDE controller board to boot from. The SATA drives have not system on it only data, so it cannot boot from these drives.

Oct 01, 2014 | Systemax PC Desktops

1 Answer

I installed a sata dvd drive in my dc5100 sff the boot order recognises it as an ide drive

i dont think it matter if your system detects it as sata or ide, both interface will work in installing OS, the important thing is you changed your boot order. originally it was supposed to boot in 1st drive whichever it is hard drive or dvd drive. go to bios then follow the instruction in how to move the order of boot sequence, mine is SHIFT key then PLUS.

Feb 28, 2014 | HP Compaq dc5100 Small Form Factor PC...

1 Answer

Cant find the slave drive on boot

Master/Slave configuration I am assuming you have IDE hard drive and not SATA. SATA is a small cable IDE is a wide 40 wire flat cable. You must install the jumper on both drives as master and slave. On the old WD HDD master has jumpers between 5 and 6 and slave jumper between 3 and 4. Default is jumper between 1 and 2 which is cable select which you use for a single drive.

Nov 09, 2013 | Dell Inspiron 531s Desktop Computer

1 Answer

This Emachine will not boot from HD or CD. The screen only says Emachine.

During the boot process you will see on the screen to press a certain key to enter setup
Press and hold that key during the boot up process to enter BIOS the using arrow key scroll down to advanced bios features press enter check to make sure the first boot device is set to your hard drive

IDE-0 means Pri master ?
IDE-1 means Pri slave ?
IDE-2 means Sec master ?
IDE-3 means Sec slave ?
you can change it to cd if you want to install an operating system

Test all leads that attach to your hard drive including electrical extensions,IDE,SATA

the leads from your ((motherboard to your hard drive)) make sure they have a secure dust free connections and are not faulty or just replace them they could be faulty

make sure all leads that are attached to your drives dvd\cd 3 1/2 inch floppy have secure connections and are not faulty or just replace them they could be faulty ?

even something as small as an electrical extension or a faulty fan lead can cause this problem

a computer needs all of the data and electrical current to travel through every working device and to have an end to be able work properly

motherboard and a hard drive any leads between them will fail before your motherboard or your hard drive if its a flat ribbon 40 pin type IDE replace it this will be the first to fail check all electrical extensions make sure they are securely seated even the cd/dvd floppy drives need to have current go through make sure these drives are working

make sure the CPU central processing unit has thermal paste and dust free and is securely seated

make sure your computer ram modules are securely seated with no dust in sockets also Cmos battery has charge with no dust in the socket some motherboards cmos batteries are soldered in

hope this helps

Apr 22, 2012 | eMachines T1440 PC Desktop

1 Answer

The computer would not boot with a 2nd IDE drive installed

Try setting the jumper on the IDE hard drive to SL (ie slave).

Mar 17, 2012 | HP (SHP) HP DC7100 CMT SRP US HP...

1 Answer

Installation of a 2nd hard drive steps & tips

Step 1: Back up and scout around

First, back up your critical files (don't forget your Outlook .PST archive) to optical discs, an external drive, or online storage. Then check whether a CD comes with the drive, providing drive-specific information and general upgrade assistance. It may also later help you copy the contents of one drive to another. Install this software first. Then, power down your PC, unplug all cables, and open the case. Next, ground yourself by touching a metal portion of the chassis.

Look inside—your first task is to determine where your new drive will go. Bays for internal drives are usually located below the wider, front-accessible bays that house CD or DVD drives. If you plan to replace your boot drive with the new drive and don't have an empty bay, your upgrade will involve more steps than we can cover here. But if you're replacing your boot drive and you have an empty bay, follow our steps for adding a second drive. After formatting it, use Norton Ghost (or a similar program) to clone your boot drive's contents to the new drive. Then, revisit steps 3 and 4 to direct your PC to boot from the new drive.

We'll be installing a SATA drive, but the process is similar for the other common drive type, IDE. SATA drives use a thin, seven-pin data cable; IDE drives use a 40-pin ribbon cable that's usually gray. If you're unsure which drive type your PC already has, check its documentation or label. Most PCs more than a year or two old employ IDE hard and optical drives, and don't support SATA unless they have a SATA PCI card installed. More-recent desktops may use (or just support) SATA drives but should support IDE, too.

Tip: If you transfer Windows XP from one drive to another, you may have to reauthorize Windows.

Step 2: Examine data and power connections

Most hard drive kits include a data cable (SATA or IDE, depending on the drive), a power adapter cable (with some SATA drives), and screws. If yours doesn't include cables, you can purchase them separately.

First, the data connection. If you're installing a SATA drive as secondary storage, follow the data cable from your current drive (assuming it's SATA, too) to the other end. See if an unused SATA port lies nearby on the motherboard or an interface card. If you can't find one, consult your PC's documentation.

If you're adding an IDE drive as a second drive, you may be able to connect it to the same data cable as your primary IDE drive, or along with an IDE optical drive. Look for a third, free connector in the middle of the cable that connects your currently installed IDE drive to the motherboard. Note that some older PCs use 40-conductor IDE cables, not the 80-conductor ones current drives require. (Compare your kit cable to the one installed—the 80-conductor variety has much thinner wires.) 80-conductor cables are backward-compatible (both types use the same 40-pin connector), so you can swap out a 40-conductor cable for your kit's 80 if need be. (The "master" drive goes at the end—see step 3.)

Next, consider the power connection. Our SATA drive has a 15-pin SATA power connector. If you already have a SATA drive installed, follow its power cable (the wider of the two connectors) to see if an unused power-supply lead with the same connector is nearby. If so, earmark that lead for your new drive. If it can't reach the empty bay, see if any bundled adapters help.

Some SATA drives also support familiar legacy Molex four-pin power connectors—you can use a Molex or SATA connector. If so, hunt for a free Molex-style lead. Still no match? Then you'll need an adapter, such as a Molex-to-SATA adapter (some kits bundle one), or a Y-adapter that splits a lead in two.

IDE drives are simpler: They always use Molex connectors. You just need a free Molex-style lead (or a Y-splitter).

Step 3: Mount and connect the drive

When installing SATA drives, jumper settings usually aren't an issue. That's not true of IDE, where a jumper indicates whether a drive is a primary ("master") or secondary ("slave") drive. Check its documentation for the proper setting. If your PC has only one IDE hard drive, it's probably set to "master." Assuming you chain another IDE drive off its cable, the new drive should be set to "slave." (You'll later have to change the jumper to "master"—and attach the drive to the cable's end—if you remove the original boot drive and make the new drive the boot drive.) Another option: Set both IDE drives on an 80-conductor cable to the Cable Select (CSEL) jumper setting. The PC will determine master/slave status according to the drives' placement on the cable ("master" at the end, "slave" in the middle).

Next, look at your current hard drive to see if mounting rails are attached to its sides. If so, screw a set onto the new drive (look inside the case for spares), then slide the drive into its bay. Otherwise, screw it directly into the bay. Four screws are sufficient. Usually, the label side points up; mimic the boot drive.

Attach one end of the SATA data cable (which is keyed for correct insertion) to a SATA port on the motherboard or interface card, the other to the drive. IDE data cables, also keyed, usually have a red stripe that lines up with the "pin 1" marking on the drive.

Next, plug the power-supply lead (keyed, too) that you scouted out in step 2 into the drive, including any necessary extender or adapter. Then close the case.

Step 4: Configure the BIOS

Next, boot into your PC's BIOS-setup utility to verify that it recognizes the new drive and positions it correctly in the drive hierarchy. (Check your PC's startup screen to determine which key launches the utility.) Once there, also check that "auto-detect" is selected for the drives, if an option. If the utility lets you select the boot order, give your intended boot drive priority over any other hard drive. This information may be under Boot Options, Boot Order, or Boot Sequence.

Save changes and exit the utility. Your PC will reboot.

Tip: Using a SATA PCI interface card? It may have its own BIOS to check.

Step 5: Partition and format your hard drive

Our PC runs Windows XP, which lets you partition and format drives within Windows. Older Windows versions, such as 98 and Me, make you do this from DOS.

With XP and 2000, though, use Windows' Disk Management utility. Click Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Computer Management, and choose Disk Management from the tree at left. Your new drive should appear, with a black bar indicating it isn't partitioned. Right-click the bar, and choose New Partition to launch the New Partition wizard.

Click Next, and check that Primary Partition is selected; click Next again, to the Specify Partition Size screen (don't change the partition size in the "Partition size in MB" field); and click Next to advance to another screen, on which "Assign the following drive letter" should be selected. Click Next yet again (to the Format Partition screen), and ensure that "Format this partition with the following settings" is selected and that the "File system" drop-down reads "NTFS." Click Next a final time, hit Finish, and formatting begins.

Formatting could take an hour or more, depending on drive capacity. But don't be surprised if your formatted drive has less capacity than the package claims. A 320GB drive, for instance, formats to about 300GB. Drive manufacturers advertise preformatted size, but a portion of the drive is inaccessible.

Dec 27, 2009 | HP Pavilion a1410n (ER890AA) PC Desktop

2 Answers

Dell DimE310 wont reeboot

You should be able to get a start up software that is a portable software that can reside on a usb stick. Hunt for this software using google. Call out for a portable xp or what ever OS system ... and you can use this as a startup. When it does start up go to safe mode and resolve the hard drive errors with trojan virues or defrag, then use error professional pro to clear out dll and other problems. Most times all the problems are found it the unused program paths and other internet cookies and affliates thet go along with the rest of the errors. You can also get Regcure, this is also a good system problem solver. This softwae really works.

Jun 17, 2009 | Dell Dimension 3100 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Dell Dimension 5510

Normally you would set it up to boot from:
1. CD/DVD drive
2. Hard Drives

There may also be a floppy drive to add in whereever you want it.
This problem sound like some kind of drive controller or the drives are not being recognized in BIOS...check and make sure you see the hard drives when setting the boot order.

Mar 15, 2009 | Dell Dimension E521 PC Desktop

1 Answer

Sata , ide

Initially connect only the sata drive from which you want to boot the OS. Establish the OS successful operation from this drive. Then connect the remaining drives in conventional way or the RAID array you want to have. 

Oct 25, 2007 | PC Desktops

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