Question about Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for PC

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First timer installing a Server network

Note: This information is intended for a network administrator. If you are not your network's administrator, notify the administrator that you received this information, which has been recorded in the file C:\Windows\debug\dcdiag.txt. I installed Windows Server 2003 R2 a few days ago, it installed with out errors. I install AD and created three users with groups that went in also with errors, now that I am trying to add three PC's ( two runing Windows XP Pro and on running Windows VIsta and two Laptops running XP Pro to that Domain and I get this error (see below) (The following error occurred when DNS was queried for the service location (SRV) resource record used to locate an Active Directory Domain Controller for domain The error was: "DNS name does not exist." (error code 0x0000232B RCODE_NAME_ERROR) The query was for the SRV record for Common causes of this error include the following: - The DNS SRV records required to locate a AD DC for the domain are not registered in DNS. These records are registered with a DNS server automatically when a AD DC is added to a domain. They are updated by the AD DC at set intervals. This computer is configured to use DNS servers with the following IP addresses: - One or more of the following zones do not include delegation to its child zone: com . (the root zone) Can you help me with this?

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Re: First timer installing a Server network

The total problem is vth ur DNS server only. If u does'nt configure the DNS server properly then these problems arises. Check the DNS server IP as well as Pref DNS server are similar in the DNS server and even in  the client side make sure that the IP must be diff and Pref DNS must be assigned of the DNS server. 

Posted on Oct 18, 2007

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Re: First timer installing a Server network

Well i'm just going to start where i would start. First off, how do your machines on the network get their IP? DHCP?

Is the first listed DNS server the AD server?

Also make sure your using case sensitive domain information when your trying to connect. It is rare but i have had that be my trouble.

I have remote software available and would love to help you fix this hands on if possible. I live for network problems ;)

Posted on Oct 10, 2007

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What is windows 2000?

Windows 2000 is a line of operating systems produced by Microsoft for use on personal computers, business desktops, laptops, and servers. Windows 2000 was released to manufacturing on 15th December 1999 [3] and launched to retail on 17 February 2000.[4] It is the successor to Windows NT 4.0, and is the final release of Microsoft Windows to display the "Windows NT" designation.[5] It was succeeded by Windows XP for desktop systems in October 2001 and Windows Server 2003 for servers in April 2003. Windows Me was released seven months after Windows 2000 and one year before Windows XP, but Windows Me was not intended to be, nor did it serve as the successor to Windows 2000. Windows Me was designed for home use, while Windows 2000 was designed for business.[6]
Four editions of Windows 2000 were released, listed here in increasing ranking: Professional, Server, Advanced Server, and Datacenter Server.[7] Additionally, Microsoft sold Windows 2000 Advanced Server Limited Edition and Windows 2000 Datacenter Server Limited Edition, which ran on 64-bit Intel Itanium microprocessors and were released in 2001.[8] While each edition of Windows 2000 was targeted at a different market, they shared a core set of features, including many system utilities such as the Microsoft Management Console and standard system administration applications.
Support for people with disabilities has been improved over Windows NT 4.0 with a number of new assistive technologies,[9] and Microsoft increased support for different languages[10] and locale information.[11]
All versions of the operating system support the Windows NT file system, NTFS 3.0,[12] the Encrypting File System, as well as basic and dynamic disk storage.[13] The Windows 2000 Server family has additional features,[14] including the ability to provide Active Directory services (a hierarchical framework of resources), Distributed File System (a file system that supports sharing of files) and fault-redundant storage volumes. Windows 2000 can be installed through either a manual or unattended installation.[15] Unattended installations rely on the use of answer files to fill in installation information, and can be performed through a bootable CD using Microsoft Systems Management Server, by the System Preparation Tool.[16]
Microsoft marketed Windows 2000 as the most secure Windows version ever at the time;[17] however, it became the target of a number of high-profile virus attacks such as Code Red and Nimda.[18] For ten years after its release, it continued to receive patches for security vulnerabilities nearly every month until reaching the end of its lifecycle on 13 July 2010.

Aug 24, 2011 | Microsoft Windows 2000

3 Answers

What is nap server?

Network Access Protection (NAP) is a Microsoft technology for controlling network access of a computer host based on the system health of the host, first introduced in Windows Server 2008.
With Network Access Protection, system administrators of an organization's computer network can define policies for system health requirements. Examples of system health requirements are whether the computer has the most recent operating system updates installed, whether the computer has the latest version of the anti-virus software signature, or whether the computer has a host-based firewall installed and enabled. Connecting or communicating computers have their health status evaluated. Computers that comply with system health requirements have full access to the network. Administrators can configure health policies that make it possible to ensure that computers not in compliance with system health requirements have restricted access to the network.

for more info. please visit the links below

Feb 22, 2011 | Microsoft Windows 2000 Server

4 Answers

Hay Bahratt, I have uninstalled the 3 SQL programs in the control panel a few times with no effect on the issue. I didn't try moving directory C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL to another...

If you have removed it from control panel, its done. You just have to clean up any left over registry entries using CCleaner and then try installing again
You may also want to check out this microsoft link if it doesn;t work

Jan 10, 2010 | Operating Systems

3 Answers

How do i get an network administrators passsword

unless you are given the status by a network manager you can't. Admin logins are set up when the network is installed, or by an existing network administrator. Breaking into netwoks is a criminal act unless you have the rights.

We do not provide this type of information without a special clearance from the network owners. Who possible have the password in their safe

Sep 10, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

3 Answers

Getting error while joining any host(winxp or other os) to domain

Hi irudayaraj, you are right,and one more for checking use this site ,really it is goos and free site.

Feb 15, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Server 2003 AD

Hello Dolly, and welcome to FixYa.
As I´m not sure if you want to make a folder for a Domain user or a Local user, so I´ll give you both.
Domain user:
Start -> Programs -> Administrative Tools -> Active Directory Users and Computers.
In the console tree, click Users.
In the Details pane, right-click the user account, and then click Properties.
In the Properties dialog box, click Profile.
Under the Home folder, type the folder information. To do this, follow these steps:
To assign a home folder on a network server, click Connect, and then specify a drive letter.
In the To box, type a path. This path can be any one of the following types:
Network path, for example: \\server\users\test
You can substitute username for the last subfolder in the path, for example: \\server\users\username
NOTE: server is the name of the file server housing the home folders, and users are the shared folder.
Click OK.
- next in the next comment:

Dec 11, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

2003 server

Hey deepak,

Yes, you can change password in 2003 server without any cd.

The thing that manages all the information about Passwords, User Accounts, Printers, And providing permission to all clients that are present on ur network, is "Active Direcory Service"

You must install Active directory to use it's funtionality.

to install active directory-

Go to start -> Run
then type "dcpromo"

Follow the wizard as per your network domain description and requirements.

Restart your computer.

Go to start -> Administrative tools -> and select Active directory users and computers.

In Active directory user and computer snap-in
Expand ur server and click Users.

You will be now able to see different accounts available on ur computer.

Select and right click Administrator and select change password or create password.

Type your password with including any of the capital letter and an digit like "Password01" check and uncheck different parameters given.

(give me ur acknowledgement by rating me)

Aug 02, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer


the difference between workgroup and the domain is
workgroup is a peer to peer network, no centralised administration and security is less.
domain is a client/ server network, administration will be done by domain and is more secure.

sys admin

Jul 02, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

1 Answer

Regarding ActiveDirectory Services in Windows system

Active Directory (AD) is a technology created by Microsoft that provides a variety of network services, including: using the same database, for use primarily in Windows environments. Active Directory also allows administrators to assign policies, deploy software, and apply critical updates to an organization. Active Directory stores information and settings in a central database. Active Directory networks can vary from a small installation with a few hundred objects, to a large installation with millions of objects (though not easily [3]).
Active Directory was previewed in 1996, released first with Windows 2000 Server edition, and revised to extend functionality and improve administration in Windows Server 2003. Additional improvements were made in both Windows Server 2003 R2 and Windows Server 2008.
Active Directory was called NTDS (NT Directory Service) in older Microsoft documents. This name can still be seen in some AD binaries.
There is a common misconception that Active Directory provides software distribution. Software distribution is run by a separate service that uses additional proprietary schema attributes that work in conjunction with the LDAP protocol. Active Directory does not automate software distribution, but provides a mechanism by which other services can provide software distribution.

Jul 01, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

2 Answers


Creating RIS images
As we have seen, CD-based RIS images can be created throug= h the RISetup utility. Additionally, there is RIPrep.exe, a utility that allows an administrator to clone a standard corporate desktop for deployment to other systems. In this section, we will examine the RIPrep utility, and also learn about creating RIS boot disks for compatible network adapters.
Unlike RISetup, which only allows an administrator to depl= oy a CD-based setup of Windows 2000 Professional (even a network-based installat= ion is just a copy of the files from the CD shared on a network drive), RIPrep = can be used to deploy the operating system plus customized settings and even locally installed desktop applications. This process is not the true disk cloning that products like Norton Ghost provide, as it can only be used with Windows 2000 Professional. Additionally, RIPrep does not support multiple h= ard drives or multiple partitions on the computer that the image is being creat= ed on.
Other limitations of RIPrep include the requirement that a CD-based image that is the same version and language as the RIPrep image also exist on the RIS server, and that the target system must have the same hardware abstraction layer (HAL) as the system us= ed to create the image. By having the same HAL, that means that an image created on a single processor system cannot be installed onto a dual processor system. Since Windows 2000 does not support Alpha processors like NT 4.0, you won't have to worry about mixing up Intel (I386) and Alpha images.
While there are limitations to RIPrep, there are advantage= s to it over using RISetup to create images. Most notably, RIPrep allows an administrator to create a standard desktop image and then use RIS to deploy= it to new computers as they come in from an OEM. Additionally, reinstallation = of the operating system is much faster from an RIPrep image since the image is being applied as a copy operation to the target hard drive and not running though an actually Windows 2000 installation as would happen with a CD or <= span class=3DGramE>network-based RISetup image.
Creating images with RIPrep
Creating an image with RIPrep is a two-step process. First= , you install and configure a computer with Windows 2000 Professional and the specific applications and settings you want to include in the image. Second, you run RIPrep.exe from the RIS server. There is an important distinction to keep clear. The RIPrep.exe utility is located on the RIS server, but is = executed from the RIS client that the image is being created on. From the client, cl= ick Start->Run and type:
If you attempt to run RIPrep.exe from a non-Windows 2000 Professional system, you receive an error message stating that the utility = will only run on Windows 2000 Professional. When you do, however, run RIPrep fro= m a valid system, the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard starts as shown in figure 13.13.
Figure 13.13 The Remote Installation Preparation Wizar= d is started by executing RIPrep.exe from a Windows 2000 Professional client com= puter
Even though you ran RIPrep.exe from one RIS server, you do= not have to necessarily copy the image you are creating to that particular serv= er. Figure 13.14 shows the next step in creating an image with RIPrep, where you choose which RIS server to copy the image to.
Figure 13.14 If you have multiple RIS servers on your network, you can choose which server should receive the image
The next step in creating the RIS image is to supply the n= ame of the installation directory on the RIS server previously chosen. Typically, = you would type the name of an existing directory only if you were replacing an existing image. If this new image will not be replacing an existing image, = type in a new directory name as shown in figure 13.15 and click next.
Figure 13.15 Supply a directory name on the RIS server= for the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard to copy the image
In our example, the image is being created for a corporate= web developer environment. For that reason, we gave the directory a descriptive name such as webdev in order to identify the image it contains on the RIS server.
In figure 13.16 we see the next step in creating an image,= which is assigning a friendly name to the image and creating the help text. The friendly name is what displays in the list of available images during the Client Installation Wizard. The help text provides an additional descriptio= n to help the user identify the correct image to use when acting as a RIS client= . In our example RIS image for a web development system, we list the applications that will be installed on the system along with the Windows 2000 Profession= al operating system as part of the imaging process.
Figure 13.16 By assigning a friendly name and help tex= t, users can identify the correct image to use during the Client Installation Wizard
If you have any programs or services running that could interfere with the imaging process, Windows 2000 will warn you. Figure 13.17 lists a number of programs and services that were running on the RIS image source workstation at the time this example image was being created. Once y= ou have closed the programs and stopped the necessary services, click next.
Figure 13.17 The Remote Installation Preparation Wizard prompts you to close any programs and services that might interfere with the imaging process.
Before beginning the actual image creation, the wizard all= ows you to review your choices. Notice in figure 13.18 that the folder name is incorrect. Initially we had created a generic folder that we had intended to use for RIS images, only to later decide to create separate subfolders for = each image. By reviewing the settings we had configured, we were able to back up through the wizard and change the folder name from RISimages to w= ebdev before starting the actual image creation.
Figure 13.18 Before starting the actual image creation= , take a moment to review your settings and ensure they are correct.
The last step, as shown in figure 13.19, is an information dialog from the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard that describes the process that is about to occur. Once you understand what is about to happen= on your system, click next to continue. You can watch the RIPrep wizard image process taking place, which will be similar to that shown in figure 13.20.<= /p> Figure 13.19 The RIPrep wizard informs you of how the = image process will take place on your system before beginning
Figure 13.20 The RIPrep wizard displays the current st= atus of the image process, showing the completed, current, and pending tasks
images created by the RIPrep wizard are stored in the same subfolder as images created during RISetup. If you took the default settings when we examined the RISetup wizard earlier in this chapter, and are using = an English language version of Windows 2000 Server, your RIS directory structu= re will be as follows:
* = \RemoteInstall\Setup\English\Image= s\\i386\ -- This is the default image created during the RISetup wizard earlier. The= re are subdirectories underneath i386 for this CD-based installation image, fo= r system32, templates, and uniproc.
* = \RemoteInstall\Setup\English\Image= s\webdev\i386\ -- This is the image directory we just created for our webdev image. There = is a directory called Mirror1 that appears under i386 that does not appea= r in the subdirectories of a RISetup created image.
RIPrep Files
In addition to the directory structure created, it is impo= rtant to know what files are important to the RIPrep image. These files are as follows:
* = RIPrep.log -- This ASCII text file documents the Remote Installation Preparation Wizard image process, listing any errors and relevant information that might be of troubleshooting use to an administrator.
* = Bootcode.dat -- This file is located in the \Mirror1 subdirectory of the image's i386 folder, and contains the boot sector information for the client system.
* = Imirror.dat -- This file also is located in the \Mirror1 directory, and contains installation information about the image source computer, such as the installation directory and the HAL type.
It is

Dec 13, 2007 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

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