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I have another problem. Was mowing yesterday and I notice smoke coming from the exhaust. White smoke. Never has down this since I've owned it. Checked over for any oil leaks and found none. Also checked the oil level and it was fine. After sitting for a while it didn't smoke but you could smell oil was burning in the exhaust fumes. Any ideas on was can cause this to suddenly happen? Could it be a head gasket?

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  • Contributor
  • 11 Answers

Typically, white smoke from an engine is the burning of coolant/water. Is your engine water cooled?

Posted on Apr 24, 2014

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: TRACTOR BLEW WHITE SMOKE, AND STARTS TO SPUTTER

Start with making sure your oil lever is not over full. If it is it may be getting into the crankcase breather hose that goes to the carburetor hence the white smoke. Sometimes also you can blow a gasket in the breather system and it will do the same. Check for oil leaks in the breather system. Hope this helps. donnyb60

Posted on Mar 21, 2009

  • 246 Answers

SOURCE: gasoline smell

Hello:

The Usuall Cause for this is the Carburetor Needle Float Valve Not Seating Properly.
When this Happens, then Exhaust Valve is Slightly Open and the Gas Flows through the Intake to the Cylinder and then Out the Exhaust Valve to the Muffler.
Soak and Clean the Carburetor and Replace the Float Needle Valve.
>>The Following is a Basic File I Made for Cleaning Carburetors. Any Input is Appreciated. Even though the Carburetor Looks Clean, the Internal Passages May be Restricted with Varnish that Gas Causes to Build Up over Time.
>>Spray Cleaners Remove this Varnish in Layers, so Soaking is the Only Sure Way to Remove ALL this Varnish.
>>I Suggest you Make Sure the Gas is Free Flowing to the Carburetor Inlet Port (if the Model does Not have a Fuel Pump). If the Gas is Free Flowing to the Inlet Port, then
>>**Remove, Disassemble and Soak the Carburetor Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk).
>>The Primer Bulb is Held in Place with a Locking Collar at the Base of the Primer Bulb. Use a Small Flat Screw Driver and Carefully Pry the Lock Ring Up in Small Amounts All Around the Lock Ring until the Lock Ring and Primer Bulb can be Removed from the Carburetor Body. Usually a New Primer Bulb is Required when you have to Soak the Carburetor. The Rubber is Usually Rotted to Much for the Primer to be Reused.
>>Your Primer Bulb May Differ Slightly, but Removal is Usually Almost the Same Except for the Primer Bulbs that are Bolted to the Carburetor. These are Simply Unbolted and Changed with the new Primer Bulb.
>>I have Found that Most People can Use a Breakdown/IPL and Disassemble the Carburetor Enough for Proper Cleaning.
>>You Only have to Remove the Bowl (if Applicable), Float Pin (if Applicable), Float (if Applicable), Needle Valve and Needle Valve Seat if Applicable. This is a Flat O-Ring Located in the Inlet Port the Float Needle Rests in. Use a Strong Wire with a Slight Bend to Remove the Old Seat. Sometimes a Small Pocket Screw Driver can be Use Also.
>>The New Seat will have a Slightly Beveled Side and a Flat Side. The Flat Side goes Towards the Carburetor Body when Inserted into the Inlet Port. Spray the Seat with Spray Lubricant to make Installation Easier. The End of a Drill Bit that is Slightly Small than the Seat can be Use as an Insertion Tool.
>>Wear Gloves or Use a Rag when Handling the Sharpened End of the Drill Bit. Remove Any Adjustment Screws that Go Into the Carburetor Body. The Welch Plugs Do Not have to be Removed.
>>If you are Able to Remove and Disassemble the Carburetor and Keep the Gaskets Intact, then Usually these Gaskets can be Reused. Even the O-Ring Around the Bowl can be Reused if it is Not Broken. The Only Parts you May Need to Replace is the Float Needle Valve (and Seat if Applicable).
>>The Float Needle Usually is Not Replaced Unless it is Not Operating Properly (the gas flow not shutting off and the carburetor is Flooding). Do Not Remove the Main Nozzle. This is a Pressed Fit and Removal is Not Required for Cleaning. Soaking and Blowing the Carburetor Out After Soaking will Clean the Nozzle.
>>Once Disassembled, then Soak the Carburetor Body and Parts in a 1 Gallon Can of Gunk Carburetor Cleaner Overnight. The Can has a Parts Tray Inside it for the Small Parts.
>>Once the Carburetor and Parts are in the Cleaner, you can Replace the Lid for Safety and to Prevent Accidental Spillage. Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air.
>>***(Do Not Use High Pressure Air for the Zama Carburetors, they have Check Valves for the Primer and these are Usually Blown Out of the Carburetor if Not Careful. Allow the Zama Carburetor to Set on a Drip Pan and Dry)***.
>>****All the Carburetor Adjustments are the Same for Lawn Mower and Trimmers. There are Several Location for the Air Mixture Screws. The Idle Air Mixture Screws are Usually Located at the Top of the Carburetor Bowl and the Top of the Carburetor Body.****
>>If the Main Air and Idle Air Mixture Screws are Side by Side on the Side of the Carburetor, then the Idle Air is Nearest the Engine. The Main Jet Air Mixture Screw is Located in the Bottom of the Carburetor Bowl or Beside the Idle Air Screw on the Side of the Carburetor Body.
>>Some of the Older Model Carburetors have the Main Jet Mixture Screw Straight in from the Top of the Carburetor Body (this is Rare anymore). If you have Cleaned the Carburetor (Disassembled and Soaked Overnight in Carburetor Cleaner (I Use Gunk). Then Blow Out the Passages with Compressed Air and Install a New Kit if Required. Now Setting the Air Mixture Screws:
>>****Turn the Idle Air and Main Air Mixture Screws In Until SNUG **Do Not Jam** Then Reverse Both Screws 1 1/2 Turns. Holding the Throttle Full Open, Start the Engine. Turn the Main Air Mixture Screw Clockwise Until Proper Revs are Obtained. Occasionally you May have to Turn this Counter Clockwise to Achieve the Proper Revs. Now Allow the Engine to Idle. Set the Engine Idle Screw (Not Idle Air) so the Engine will Stay Running if Required. Now Set the Idle Air Mixture Screw so there is No Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle. Reset the Engine Idle if Required.****
>>If This Carburetor has a Single Air Adjustment (Except Tank Mounted 9200 and 100900 Engine Model Carburetors), Use the Section Above that Pertains to Full Throttle RPM Air Mixture Screw and then Adjust the Screw if Required to Eliminate Any Hesitation when Throttling from Idle to Full Throttle.
>>For the 9200 Model Tank Mounted Carburetor Adjust the Air Mixture Screw Full In, then Reverse 1 1/2 Turns. Set the Throttle Lever to Full Throttle and Start the Engine.
>>Now Carefully Use 1 Finger and Open the Throttle Plate and Over Rev the Engine Slightly. If the Engine Over Revs and Does Not Struggle to Over Rev, then the Carburetor is Set. If the Engine Struggles to Over Rev, then Turn the Adjustment Screw In 1/4 Turn and Repeat the Over Rev Test.
>>If you Adjust to 1/2 Turns In and the Engine Still Struggles to Over Rev, then Return the Adjustment Screw to 1 1/2 Turns Out from Snug and Turn the Screw Out 1/4 Turn. Do the Over Rev Test. Continue this Process Until you have the Engine Over Revving without Struggle.
>>By Adjusting the Carburetor on this Style Carburetor Until the Engine Over Revs without Struggle, you have Adjusted the Air Mixture to the Best Possible Setting.
>>This file was Intended to Give you the Basic Carburetor Cleaning Instructions and May Not Reflect Your Carburetor Components.
>>If you have Questions, Please Ask. The links above Provide Good Directions on Cleaning the Carburetor. Make sure you use an Compressed Air to Blow through all the Carburetor Passages to make sure they are Clear.
>>1- http://www.repairfaq.org/samnew/lmfaq/lmclctc.htm
>>2- http://www.cpdonline.com/692509.pdf .
Please, Do Not Hesitate, If you Hit a Snag or this Does Not Correct the Problem, I am Here if You Require More Assistance.
Hope this Helps. Let me Know What Happens, Please. May the All Mighty Bless You and Yours. Be Safe and Be Happy. Thanks.

Good Luck

Respectfully

jbridger (John)

Posted on May 11, 2009

  • 81 Answers

SOURCE: oil leaking from air filter area of push mower and mower smoking

You have overfilled the oil tank. White smoke is only a hassle, not a serious problem. You have to empty some of the oil and change the gas. Clean the air filter if it is the spongy type with Dawn Dishwashing Liquid, rinsing and drying it well before reinstalling. The white smoke will stop soon as it is still in the gas that is in the carb. If the case is that you haven't filled it with oil prior to this smoke then you must be mowing on a hillside and the gas tank was on the lower side allowing oil to leak into the gas. Same solution.

Posted on Jun 24, 2009

  • 77 Answers

SOURCE: Strange noise from deck of Toro LX426

The engine wont have an impact with the deck because its belt driven. It sure sounds like you have a bad set of spindle bearings,just turning it by hand you wont hear any noise it has to be going fast to hear it. The noise may be coming from your clutch instead of the deck,and it sounds like the deck. Have these things checked out.

Posted on Aug 09, 2009

  • 124 Answers

SOURCE: 12 HP I/C Briggs engine dies due to oil in air breather

The reason the oil is getting into the air filter is that it is blowing by the piston rings. My suggestion is that you have stuck piston rings or severe wear in the piston and cylinder. You need to pull the head and see if you can tell about the wear or the condition of the rings. Pulling the head is not hard but knowing what you are looking at or knowing what you see when you get to that point is a different matter. I think you nrre to take it to a good shop.

As a last resort you might just consider running it without an air filter and see what happens.

Posted on Sep 13, 2009

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2 Answers

My car has white smoke coming from the exhaust


he causes of white exhaust smoke can vary; however, it is common to see white exhaust smoke when first starting a car, especially on cooler days. This is generally steam caused by condensation. As the engine warms up and the condensation dissipates the white exhaust smoke (steam) is no longer seen. If excessive white exhaust smoke is present well after the engine warms up, it is necessary to have the car inspected for possible internal coolant leaks. Indicators of an internal coolant leak include billowing white exhaust smoke accompanied by a sweet odor or a low coolant reservoir level. An internal coolant leak can also contaminate the engine oil giving it a frothy, milky appearance. Even small amounts of coolant entering the combustion chamber will produce white exhaust smoke.
One of the main causes of white exhaust smoke and coolant loss is a cracked or warped cylinder head, a cracked engine block, or head gasket failure caused by overheating. A cracked head may allow coolant to leak into one or more cylinders or into the combustion chamber of the engine. Dirty coolant, a poorly maintained cooling system, a low coolant level, or a non-functioning cooling fan can cause engine overheating. In addition, engine wear can eventually cause the gaskets to lose their capacity to seal properly allowing internal coolant loss. Intake manifold gasket and head gasket failures are two of the most common sources of internal coolant loss caused by engine wear.
Never remove the radiator cap or coolant reservoir cap while the engine is hot or running as it can cause serious injury; always allow the car to cool down completely first. Checking for a low coolant level in the reservoir is the first step in determining if coolant loss is causing the white exhaust smoke. If the coolant reservoir is at the proper level but excessive white exhaust smoke is present, a cooling system pressure check is required to determine where, if any, coolant leaks are located.

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sounds like it is still overfilled ,, oil is leaking on the back side of the piston .. or may be a blown head gasket and being overfilled was just a coincidence if it is a briggs motor I would be suspect of a head gasket.

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