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How much should I feed my dwarf african frog? He's about the size of the top of my thumb. I am feeding him frog, newt and tadpole pellets.

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Mabe some insects like ants !

Posted on Oct 21, 2013

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What do hermit crabs eat?


  1. You can feed a combination of pelleted Hermit Crab food, as well asfruits, such as chopped apples, grapes and bananas, and vegetables, including dark green leafy ones like kale and broccoli. Pellet-type food can be crushed into powder to feed small Hermit Crabs. Feed one teaspoon for small crabs.

Jul 12, 2014 | Necchi Sewing Machines

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How to eliminate frogs from my yard


Part 1 of 3: Identifying the Frogs

Identify the frog species you're dealing with. Not only will this information help you get rid of the frogs (different species respond to different methods) but it will also ensure that you're not doing something illegal, as some species of frogs are protected by law. Invasive frogs that are a nuisance to both people and local ecology include:

• Bullfrogs outside of their native environment in eastern North America. They compete with native frogs, eat native frogs, and chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease that has led to the extinction of 100 frog species. [1]

• Cane toads outside of their native environment in Central and South America. While not a frog, many people reading this article will be dealing with these amphibians. They are especially rampant in Australia.

• Cuban tree frogs outside of their native habitat in Cuba. These are a big nuisance in Florida, where they even cause power outages.[2]

• Coqui frogs outside of their native environment in Puerto Rico.

Check the laws in your area. In many parts of the world, it's illegal to kill non-invasive species, but people are encouraged to manage invasive species (and in some cases it's illegal to release an invasive frog once you've caught it).


Part 2 of 3: Change the Environment

1) Drain any standing water. Frogs are attracted to moisture, so removing sources of water from your yard will cause most frogs to lose interest.

• You can rent a pump to get rid of most water sources.

• Birdbaths, swampy areas, bowls of water, and ponds are just a few examples of water sources that attract frogs.

• Removing sources of stagnant water will also drive away mosquitoes and other insects that frogs feed on, making the area even less appealing.

• If the water source in your yard is something you want to keep, like an artificial pond, try draining it and leaving the pond empty for a week. Most of the frog population should lose interest in this time and move on.

• Alternatively, add a filter or running fountain to your pond. This will cause the water to circulate, thereby eliminating most mosquitoes and other insects. The frogs will still be attracted to the water, but with a decrease in food supply, many may still end up moving on.


2) Trim your weeds. Tall grass, shrubs, or other bushy plants make the perfect hiding place for frogs. Clearing these elements away forces the frogs to be exposed, which is a condition they generally try to avoid.
• Tall plants around a water source is especially troublesome. If you want to maintain tall or bushy plants somewhere in your yard, position them as far away from any water source as possible.

3) Clear away any debris. Like tall grass, clutter in your yard serves as an excellent hiding place for frogs. Removing it will chase many frogs away.
• Remove empty pots, old lumber, piles of wood chips, or any other structure that may create a damp, dark place for frogs to hide.

4) Turn off outside lighting.[3] Light attracts insects, and insects attract frogs. Turning off your outdoor lights at night will reduce both insect and frog populations.
• Shut off garden lights and porch lights. Close the drapes and curtains in your house to reduce the amount of light filtering out from inside.

5) Keep pet food inside the house. While somewhat uncommon, frogs do occasionally steal dog food or cat food. Feed your pets inside or keep the dish inside when the dog or cat is not eating.

6) Kill the insects. Since flies, mosquitoes, and other insects are the primary food source for frogs, killing the bugs will deter frogs from coming to your yard.
• Use a bug zapper. Place the bug zapper on your porch to attract and kill all manner of flying insects.
• Spray organic insecticides. Many chemical insecticides will also kill the frogs, but most organic insecticides do not have that effect.

7) Set up fencing. Surround your property or pond with mesh netting or plastic fencing.
• Do not use chicken wire or chain-link fencing, since frogs can easily slip through these types of fences.
• Make sure that the fencing starts at ground level and stands tall. Frogs can leap a considerable height, so a standard-size fence will work better than a purposefully low one.
• Take precautions to keep the fence stable. Bury the support posts 1 foot (30.5 cm) underground, at minimum, and bury a portion of the fencing material beneath the ground, too.


Part 3 of 3: Physical Removal

1) Catch the frogs with a net. Use a butterfly net or another type of long-handled, thinly-meshed net to capture the frogs one by one.
• If you have an abundance of frogs, you may need to enlist the help of others to accomplish this task.
• Relocate the frogs. After catching the frogs, consider relocating them to a nearby pond or stream. When relocating frogs, however, it is important to introduce the frogs to an area that the breed or species can be naturally found in. Otherwise, you can upset the ecological balance of that habitat.
• Freeze the frogs to death.[4] If it is impossible to relocate the frogs, you can kill them humanely by freezing them. Place the frogs in a sealable container with air holes punched through the lid. Store this container in the refrigerator overnight. The frogs will ease into a coma-like state. The following day, move the container to the freezer and store the frogs there for 48 to 72 hours. Temperatures this cold should kill them.

2) Gather and destroy the tadpoles. Use a standard aquarium fish net to scoop up any tadpoles in your pond or other water source. Lay the tadpoles out in the sun for a day or so. The dry heat should kill them.
• You can lay the captured tadpoles out on the cement or lawn, but the drier to surface, the quicker the extermination should be.
• Alternatively, you could also bury the captured tadpoles underground. This, too, should kill them.

3) Set traps indoors. If the frogs have found their way indoors, set up standard mouse traps to kill them.
• Place these traps around any opening that leads from the outside to the inside, such as garage doors, basement windows and vents.

4) Use chemicals and organic sprays only as a last resort. While there are chemical pest control measures you can take to get rid of the frogs in your yard, these options often torment or kill the frogs slowly and should be avoided unless no other option has proven effective. When possible, use repelling measures rather than lethal ones.
• Try snake repellent.[5] Spraying snake repellent around the perimeter of your yard is often an effective repellent against frogs. In fact, snake repellent is usually about as effective at getting rid of frogs as it is at getting rid of snakes.
• Use herbicide. Studies suggest that certain weed killers chemically alter male frogs, stripping away their ability to reproduce.[6] As a result, spraying these herbicides in areas where frogs gather can greatly reduce future frog populations.
• Spray the frogs with citric acid. Mix 1.3 lb (600 g) dry citric acid with 1 gallon (4 liters) of water in a large spray bottle.[7] Spray the solution directly on the frogs. It should kill them almost immediately.
• Spread salt. If you do not have any plants near your pond, spread a little salt around the perimeter. Salt will burn the toes of the frogs, deterring them from the area. Note that salt will destroy plants, however.
• Spritz the frogs with caffeine. Concentrated caffeine will kill frogs by causing them to have heart attacks, but you can spread coffee grounds around the areas where frogs gather to deter them without killing them off. It will cause the frogs discomfort, but will not likely kill them.

5) Hire an exterminator. If you are uncertain about how to remove the frogs or are unsuccessful in your efforts, hire a professional.

This article with images can be found here:

How to Get Rid of Frogs: 14 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow

http://www.wikihow.com/Get-Rid-of-Frogs

Jul 13, 2014 | Hunting

1 Answer

Pinnacle Pellet stove augre gets stuck


hmm, could be low power to the motor, heavier power cord, or it's possible the auger needs new bushing/bearings, wiggle the auger to see if it has any play in it OR it's fussy about the size of pellets it made to feed. please send pictures and or results.
Jay

Jun 08, 2017 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

What kind of foods should I feed a parrot?


You can feed a parrot a mixture of pellet food and human food. The pellet food should represent up to 80% of their diets. Other foods you can feed them include leafy green vegetables, certain breads/cereals, small amounts of protein like boiled chicken and fruits. Try not to feed your parrot any dairy products.

Aug 29, 2012 | Allied Precision Birds

1 Answer

What food should I give my African grey?


African greys in the wild feed primarily on fruits and seeds, and palm nuts but captive-bred African Greys are fed a diet of seeds, grain, pellets and frits and vegetables. I would also recommend adding calcium to their diet by scraping the cuddlebones over their food or mixing grinded egg shells in their food.

May 14, 2012 | Birds

1 Answer

I have the same problem that bethanypitha has...the auger won't regulate the amount of pellets it spits out and they back up...even though the feed is turned all they way down


If you changed the brand of pellets that you normally had used, that may be the problem. Unfortunately, no two pellet manufacturers make their pellets the same way and the exact same size. You will need to tweek your stove to that brand of pellets. If you have your Owners Manual, look under Trouble Shooting and you'll probably find the answer. If not, contact the manufacturer of your pellet stove for more information.

Jan 25, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

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