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Fire power 160 heat range will not go low enough to weld thin material.

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You need a smaller welder. Pick up a nice 110 unit that has at least 4 power settings. I have a lincoln 95 amp that will weld body panels on low and 1/2" on high.

Posted on Oct 18, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Body damaged where clutch cable goes through fire wall golf 1


Heard this before. I think it was a VW, too. One guy said to get a thin metal plate and tack weld it in place or rivet it in place, even. You would probably want to pre-drill the hole for the cable to pass through.

Nov 17, 2012 | Cars & Trucks

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I am trying to locate a chart that would have the recommended operator control settings for different types & thickness of metals using my Snap-On YA 212A Ind. Mig wire welder.


See if your local welding supplier has a welding guide available. Some even include them as part of their catalog.

There is no real hard and fast absolte rule when welding with Mig. If you weld outside, and in the country where line voltage can vary, what worked well a day ago may not work well today. Those tables are only a rough guide at best, and while useful to you starting out, after a time when you are used to your welder, you will not need it.

What the weld looks like from the back side can tell you more useful information than you might get from a simple arbitrary table.

The best guide- experience. Start welding up scrap to get used to the welder, and get used to the sound of frying bacon or eggs. Then you can rely on your own judgement instead of feeling a need to refer to a book each time.

What the simple rule of thumb is, pick a heat range you think you need to use, then grab some scrap and lay out a bead adjusting the wire speed until you hear it sound like bacon on the frying pan. Then you adjust your speed to the thickness of the metal to achieve full *********** and ideally the back side looking like the front side. If not enough ***********- go up a heat range, and reset wire speed and try again.

When I was doing industrial welding for a grain handling equipment company I moved all around the shop and ended up on many different machines. None of them operated with the identical settings of the others even though a couple of them were of the same manufacture..

Dec 31, 2011 | Welding Tools

1 Answer

What is welding?why welding is important?


Welding: It's a fabrication or sculptural process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. This is often done by melting the workpieces and adding a filler material to form a pool of molten material (the weld pool) that cools to become a strong joint, with pressure sometimes used in conjunction with heat, or by itself, to produce the weld. This is in contrast with soldering and brazing, which involve melting a lower-melting-point material between the workpieces to form a bond between them, without melting the workpieces.

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Welding Power point presentation

Download this presentation and view it for more details.

Jun 12, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

WHAT IS RESISTANCE WELDING?


Electric resistance welding (ERW) refers to a group of welding processes such as spot and seam welding that produce coalescence of faying surfaces where heat to form the weld is generated by the electical reistance of material vs the time and the force used to hold the materials together during welding. Some factors influencing heat or welding temperatures are the proportions of the workpieces, the coating or the lack of coating, the electrode materials, electrode geometry, electrode pressing force, weld current and weld time. Small pools of molten metal are formed at the point of most electrical resistance (the connecting surfaces) as a high current (100-100,000 A) is passed through the metal. In general, resistance welding methods are efficient and cause little pollution, but their applications are limited to relatively thin materials and the equipment cost can be high. although in production situations the cost per weld may be as low as $.04 usd per weld depending on application and manufacturing rate.

Feb 02, 2011 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

How too set up a tig welder for welding thin steel?


DC current, electrode negative (DC Straight, DC-), High frequency for start only (really don't have to use high freq at all for steel but it helps establish the arc without scratching), 1 amp per thousandth of material thickness is a good setting to start, adjust from there for the job. 1 amp/thousandth also applies to aluminum- it has a lower melting point than steel but conducts heat much better so power to weld is very nearly the same.

Use a sharp tungsten, don't ball it at all (as you would for AC work).

lp

Dec 01, 2010 | Miller SYNCROWAVE 250 DX TIG RUNNER WELDER...

1 Answer

Troubleshooting electrical stove


Infinite switch, it's not cycling internal contacts are welded together, make sure control it's set on low, if the heat element. stays red hot, replace control (inf. switch).

Dec 23, 2009 | Kitchen Ranges

1 Answer

Having problem with heat range.


Try keeping your heat setting hot, but increase your wire speed and regulate your welding speed accordingly. How does the weld look with your settings where you started?

Aug 07, 2009 | Welding Tools

1 Answer

Trying to weld with Hobart 125 EZ


If you are using flux wire and not shielding gas, your clamp should be positive and the wire should be negative. Heat is provided by the electrical arc that happens between the wire and the material. Your welder by itself does not pre heat the material and with 3/16 material you should not need to preheat anyway.

The electrical arc is kept consistent by adjusting the wire feed rate and the current applied. You will need to experiment with these settings to find what works best with your welder. For this welder and 3/16 material, I would suggest you start at the upper end of the current scale and about a third of the way up on wire speed. The welder might have a chart for these settings in the manual or inside cover.

If the wire feeds too fast, it will push the probe around and you will feel pressure as the wire feeds out. If the speed is too slow you will get large spatters and intermittent arcs. When properly adjusted the arc will sound even and consistent. The arc gap should always be about 1/8 of an inch.

To maintain enough heat for good penatration, do not move the probe too fast, work in a pattern and watch the weld pool (melted metal) and not the arc. Watching the weld pool will clue you in if you are moving too fast or too slow.

I hope this helps.

-Scott

Feb 03, 2009 | Hobart Handler 125 Ez

4 Answers

Welding Dangerous


Compared to other industrial jobs, welding is fairly dangerous. The occupational and health hazards of welding can be avoided with proper equipment, safe materials, and a few common sense measures. Risks associated with welding include asphyxiation due to dangerous inhalants, skin and eye damage due to ultraviolet light, electrical or chemical fires, and long-term negative effects from fumes. Most people think that sparks and arcs are the most dangerous aspects of welding because they call attention to themselves, but they are only one risk. The brightness of the sparks, with their strong UV light, can cause cancer in unprotected eyes and skin. Yet there is a wide range of equipment, such as auto-darkening helmets and thick gloves, to reduce your exposure. Also, sparks are not usually hot, yet general precautions should be taken to keep wood or other combustible material out of the range of the welder's arc. Setting heated metal on a flammable surface is more likely to start a fire. The leading cause of health problems in welders relates to carcinogenic or toxic chemicals. These chemicals might be in a sealant or coating over the metal surfaces to be welded. Extreme heat releases molecules into the air, where they are easily inhaled. Certain substances might also be embedded in the material itself, like lead, cadmium, manganese, chromium, or nickel in metals like stainless steel, copper, or zinc. These metals should only be welded with extreme caution. Make sure you know exactly what they contain and weld in an area with a lot of air circulation. Symptoms from inhalation can range from a temporary flu-like sickness to major damage to lungs, liver, and other organs. For instance, manganism from manganese exposure is related to Parkinson's Disease. Even when you are careful with regard to sealants and varieties of metals, the process of welding always produces other dangerous gases. For instance, a variation of oxygen called ozone is created with every welding arc. Ozone exists naturally in the atmosphere, but large concentrations of ozone displace oxygen. If you weld in an enclosed space, ordinarily safe gases can become too concentrated and cause edema, filling your lungs with water. Ozone, nitrogen oxide, and carbon dioxide build up, making you pass out, hit your head, or suffer brain damage.

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