Question about Whirlpool Inglis IP8200 Dryer

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I changed the dryer cord from 4 wire to 3 wire.. Dryer worked for about 20 mins.. then shut off and will not restart

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There are 4 wires for a reason. The heaters require 220 volts and the white wire helps give 120 volts to the motor and control circuits. Altering these without any knowledge of electricity results in the control circuit and or the motor blowing up. Here in Canada and USA anyways

Posted on Oct 15, 2013

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

jsrock516
  • 5911 Answers

SOURCE: front loader whirlpool dryer (04') 3-prong cord; 4-prong outlet..

No..you need to replace your 3-prong power cord with a new 4-prong power cord. The following link explains how:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r793520-3_prong_4_prong_power_cord_conversion

It is a requirement that newer homes have the 4-wire outlet configuration. If your home came with this style outlet, you must update the appliance to be within the National Electrical Code specifications.

The main difference is the way the Neutral (WHITE) wire and the Ground (GREEN) wire is installed. The neutral and ground are independent of each other in a 4-wire configuration. Simply put: Ground the green wire to the equipment cabinet or ground lug. Remove any grounding strap that is on the terminal block for the neutral wire. The instructions I provided will explain this.

If you have any questions, please ask. I hope this helps you.

Posted on Jul 16, 2009

  • 547 Answers

SOURCE: Outlet has 3 holes and dryer cord has 4

A 4-prong dryer cord means your dryer requires 240 volts, and will not work with a normal 120V household outlet.

Is your existing outlet a normal outlet like every other one in your house, or is it three holes in an unusual pattern?

If you want to get technical, I'm guessing that your dryer cord is a NEMA-14 (see the picture to the right for examples of NEMA-14-30 and 14-50 plug patterns)
I'm also guessing that the outlet is a NEMA-5 outlet.

If either of my guesses are wrong, let me know what picture/description best fits your cord/outlet and I'll try to help as best I can.

Posted on Aug 02, 2009

Macmarkus
  • 2605 Answers

SOURCE: hooking a 4 wire power cord to a dryer that came with 3 prongs

*First ; before starting unplug unit or shut off breaker.

you should be able to match up color for color on your dryer, the fourth wire, green (ground) screws to the chassis, or cabinet. if your wires aren't coded as you say, it is red, white and black, left to right. see picture I've supplied.981ddeb.jpg
hope that helps

good luck

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

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1 Answer

How to connect a dryer


Hi Sheliah,

I'm an electrician and would like to help you. Assuming you're in the U.S. and this is an electric dryer (not gas), you will need to find a 240 (a.k.a. 250) volt / 30 amp circuit to connect it to for it to work. This would be connected to a double pole 30 amp circuit breaker in the electrical panel. There is no simple residential "adapter" to change voltage, current or number of wires - besides the old 3 wire grounding plug adapter in you grandmother's junk drawer. (What is a 50/250 volt dryer? - did you mean a 30A/250V?)

Your dryer should have a 4 wire cord with a 4 prong plug on the end - and it will need to be plugged into a matching outlet. The old electrical code allowed you to change the cord to match the outlet, but now it requires that both the cord and the outlet be a 4 wire type. The old 3 wire cord type is no longer permitted to be used when the dryer is moved or replaced. Of course, 3 wire cords are available everywhere and it is unlikely that anyone will turn you in for changing the dryer's 4 wire cord back to a 3 wire cord type (but I just wanted to tell they way it is supposed to be done). What you do - is your business.

If you have a gas (or LP) dryer, you probably only need a 120 volt / 15 or 20 amp outlet - they look like the standard types - but I think you'd have simply plugged it in and walked away if that were the case.

I hope this helped!

Apr 07, 2014 | Dryers

1 Answer

How do you connect the LG DLEX5101V Dryer to the electrical outlet on the wall if there is no cord to plug in?


There are a couple of types of plugs in homes - and the dryer manufacturer use this excuse to not ship a cord with the dryer - profiting that much more. You'll need to purchase a cord set for your dryer. Assuming you live in the U.S., that means you need a 30 amp 240 volt cord. That's easy enough, but it does get harder.

Most homes have an outlet that has three slots in it - like the one below:
steve_con_39.jpg
A 240 volt, 30 amp, 3 wire dryer plug.

New homes have a safer, 240 volt 30amp 4 wire plug. They look like the one below:
steve_con_40.jpg
A 240 volt, 30 amp, 4 wire dryer plug.

The code states that when a dryer is purchased it should be connected via a 4 wire cord. This means if you have the older, 3 wire outlet - it will have to be changed along with the entire length of cable between the electrical panel and the outlet (the new outlet needs a 4 wire cable - the older plug was supplied by a 3 wire cable).

Those are the rules. Many people opt to purchase the older 3 wire cords so that they can connect directly to the 3 wire outlet already installed in their home. As an electrician, I have to caution you on doing that. It is a violation of the electrical code as it has been identified as an unsafe condition. The code hopes to rectify this by slowly requiring new dryers to be wired with 4 wire cords and making the homeowner upgrade the old 3 wire outlet to a newer, safer 4 wire outlet. Of course, no one will come to see what you had and if you changed it, etc.

Mose hardware stores, Home Depot, Lowes, etc. sell these cords for under $20. Make sure you choose a 30 amp dryer cord - and not the similar looking but thicker 50 amp stove or range cord.

I hope this helps & good luck! Please rate my reply.

Mar 22, 2011 | LG Dryers

1 Answer

The cord need to be changed from a 4 prong cord, 4 wire to a 3 prong cord, 3 wire 220V. which of the connections do i connect to?


Hi,
Here is a tip that will help you with changing your dryer plug. Dryer Cord and Wiring Dryer 3 Wire or 4 Wire



heatman101

Sep 15, 2010 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

My dryer has a 4 wire i need to change to 3 wire cord


Hi,
Here is a tip that explains the hookup in detail.
You can easily change that dryer fron 4 wire to 3 wire.

Dryer Cord and Wiring Dryer 3 Wire or 4 Wire
http://www.fixya.com/support/r4496386-dryer_cord_wiring_dryer_3_wire_or_4_wire

heatman101

Aug 20, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

I am changing the 4 wire on my 2 yr old maytag dryer to a 3 wire to fit the recptical in my new house. Other then the 2 hots and 1 neutral connection, my dryer also has a white ground wire off to the side,...


So you have an, ahem... problem....you have a Code compliant dryer (with it's 4 wire cord and plug)....and have moved into an older home that is not Code compliant (with it's 3 prong receptacle outlet)....and this is fairly common.

At this point - you have two choices....replace the wiring from the dryer's breaker to the receptacle with all new 8/3 with ground romex (it more then likely only has 8/2 with ground now)....and replace the receptacle with a 4 prong grounding receptacle to match your dryer's cord....OR - as an alternative - you can replace the cord on your dryer with a 3 prong cord to match the existing dryer receptacle outlet.

Out of the 2 choices....the first one will bring the old wiring in the home up to current Codes (all NEW homes must have this 4 wire/4 prong set-up per Code...but older homes are grand-fathered)...but it is clearly the most involved, time consuming and most costly approach...and it is recommended only an electrician do this work. If this approach is taken....your dryer cord can stay as is...it will now fit the new receptacle outlet with no modifications.

The second approach - is to pick up a 3 wire 3 prong cord at your local hardware store to match the existing 3 prong receptacle.....and replace the 4 wire cord on your dryer with it. Although this is the least desireable - it is an allowed approach because this is an older home with existing wiring. This is a much less involved approach...all you need to buy is the 3 wire dryer cord (they come all ready to go) remove the 4 wire cord and install the 3 wire cord to your electrical connections at the back of the dryer. Hopefully...when the 4 wire cord was installed on your dryer, the ground strap wasn't removed completely (this is a metal strap that will connect the white wire to the metal frame of the dryer)...because now you will need to re-use the ground strap. For more on this....see the images of the differences of the 3 wire and 4 wire dryer hook-up at:
http://www.applianceaid.com/general.html#3to4

NOTE: the only real difference between the 3 wire cord and the 4 wire cord is now the white neutral and the ground are kept seperate in a 4 wire..the green ground will connect directly to the dryer frame....where in a 3 wire there is no seperate ground wire - ground and neutral are one and the same...the ground strap connects the frame to the white neutral. The 4 wire permits a better safety measure...in the event of an electrical problem (ground fault) in the dryer...the fault now has a seperate path to your panel's ground...and less chance of a shock from touching the metal frame of the dryer.

The choice of how to proceed is up to you....if you go with completely updating the dryer wiring from the breaker outward...I recommend an electrician do this work for you (it's about an hour's work...plus materials). Then your exisiting dryer's 4 wire 4 prong cord can stay as is....the electrician will install a 4 prong receptacle made to fit your cord.

If you go with simply replacing the dryer's cord....changing it to a 3 wire so it will fit the receptacle...make sure the ground strap is re-utilized as seen in the images at the site above.(also make sure all work is done with the dryer breaker (or fuse if a really old home) off before starting any work. If you change the cord yourself...make sure to reconnect in exactly the same manner as the previous cord was connected...(make a note on paper or take pictures so that there are no mistakes)..and that you tighten the nuts securely to the posts once the wire lugs are on them. Where you state you do not have a background in electrical work...you can have an electrician change this cord for you...(typically in under a half-hour)....or you can do it yourself - by carefully following the pictures.

The choice is yours...if it was me - I'd change the wiring from the breaker outward...making the older home meet today's current Codes and be complaint for this dryer..and then you wouldn't need to change a thing on the dryer....but you can go either way....Codes allow this grandfathering in older homes with existing wiring.

Feb 19, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

3 wire to 4 wir


So you have an, ahem... problem....you have a Code compliant dryer (with it's 4 wire cord and plug)....and have moved into an older home that is not Code compliant (with it's 3 prong receptacle outlet)....and this is fairly common.

At this point - you have two choices....replace the wiring from the dryer's breaker to the receptacle with all new 8/3 with ground romex (it more then likely only has 8/2 with ground now)....and replace the receptacle with a 4 prong grounding receptacle to match your dryer's cord....OR - as an alternative - you can replace the cord on your dryer with a 3 prong cord to match the existing dryer receptacle outlet.

Out of the 2 choices....the first one will bring the old wiring in the home up to current Codes (all NEW homes must have this 4 wire/4 prong set-up per Code...but older homes are grand-fathered)...but it is clearly the most involved, time consuming and most costly approach...and it is recommended only an electrician do this work. If this approach is taken....your dryer cord can stay as is...it will now fit the new receptacle outlet with no modifications.

The second approach - is to pick up a 3 wire 3 prong cord at your local hardware store to match the existing 3 prong receptacle.....and replace the 4 wire cord on your dryer with it. Although this is the least desireable - it is an allowed approach because this is an older home with existing wiring. This is a much less involved approach...all you need to buy is the 3 wire dryer cord (they come all ready to go) remove the 4 wire cord and install the 3 wire cord to your electrical connections at the back of the dryer. Hopefully...when the 4 wire cord was installed on your dryer, the ground strap wasn't removed completely (this is a metal strap that will connect the white wire to the metal frame of the dryer)...because now you will need to re-use the ground strap. For more on this....see the images of the differences of the 3 wire and 4 wire dryer hook-up at:
http://www.applianceaid.com/general.html#3to4

NOTE: the only real difference between the 3 wire cord and the 4 wire cord is now the white neutral and the ground are kept seperate in a 4 wire..the green ground will connect directly to the dryer frame....where in a 3 wire there is no seperate ground wire - ground and neutral are one and the same...the ground strap connects the frame to the white neutral. The 4 wire permits a better safety measure...in the event of an electrical problem (ground fault) in the dryer...the fault now has a seperate path to your panel's ground...and less chance of a shock from touching the metal frame of the dryer.

The choice of how to proceed is up to you....if you go with completely updating the dryer wiring from the breaker outward...I recommend an electrician do this work for you (it's about an hour's work...plus materials). Then your exisiting dryer's 4 wire 4 prong cord can stay as is....the electrician will install a 4 prong receptacle made to fit your cord.

If you go with simply replacing the dryer's cord....changing it to a 3 wire so it will fit the receptacle...make sure the ground strap is re-utilized as seen in the images at the site above.(also make sure all work is done with the dryer breaker (or fuse if a really old home) off before starting any work. If you change the cord yourself...make sure to reconnect in exactly the same manner as the previous cord was connected...(make a note on paper or take pictures so that there are no mistakes)..and that you tighten the nuts securely to the posts once the wire lugs are on them. Where you state you do not have a background in electrical work...you can have an electrician change this cord for you...(typically in under a half-hour)....or you can do it yourself - by carefully following the pictures.

The choice is yours...if it was me - I'd change the wiring from the breaker outward...making the older home meet today's current Codes and be complaint for this dryer..and then you wouldn't need to change a thing on the dryer....but you can go either way....Codes allow this grandfathering in older homes with existing wiring.

Feb 11, 2010 | Kenmore 94802 Front Load Stacked Washer /...

2 Answers

How to hook up a 4 wire plug to a Maytag clothes dryer model LDE8824ACM with 3 wire connecters.


So you have an, ahem... problem....you have a Code compliant dryer (with it's 4 wire cord and plug)....and have moved into an older home that is not Code compliant (with it's 3 prong receptacle outlet)....and this is fairly common.

At this point - you have two choices....replace the wiring from the dryer's breaker to the receptacle with all new 8/3 with ground romex (it more then likely only has 8/2 with ground now)....and replace the receptacle with a 4 prong grounding receptacle to match your dryer's cord....OR - as an alternative - you can replace the cord on your dryer with a 3 prong cord to match the existing dryer receptacle outlet.

Out of the 2 choices....the first one will bring the old wiring in the home up to current Codes (all NEW homes must have this 4 wire/4 prong set-up per Code...but older homes are grand-fathered)...but it is clearly the most involved, time consuming and most costly approach...and it is recommended only an electrician do this work. If this approach is taken....your dryer cord can stay as is...it will now fit the new receptacle outlet with no modifications.

The second approach - is to pick up a 3 wire 3 prong cord at your local hardware store to match the existing 3 prong receptacle.....and replace the 4 wire cord on your dryer with it. Although this is the least desireable - it is an allowed approach because this is an older home with existing wiring. This is a much less involved approach...all you need to buy is the 3 wire dryer cord (they come all ready to go) remove the 4 wire cord and install the 3 wire cord to your electrical connections at the back of the dryer. Hopefully...when the 4 wire cord was installed on your dryer, the ground strap wasn't removed completely (this is a metal strap that will connect the white wire to the metal frame of the dryer)...because now you will need to re-use the ground strap. For more on this....see the images of the differences of the 3 wire and 4 wire dryer hook-up at:
http://www.applianceaid.com/general.html#3to4

NOTE: the only real difference between the 3 wire cord and the 4 wire cord is now the white neutral and the ground are kept seperate in a 4 wire..the green ground will connect directly to the dryer frame....where in a 3 wire there is no seperate ground wire - ground and neutral are one and the same...the ground strap connects the frame to the white neutral. The 4 wire permits a better safety measure...in the event of an electrical problem (ground fault) in the dryer...the fault now has a seperate path to your panel's ground...and less chance of a shock from touching the metal frame of the dryer.

The choice of how to proceed is up to you....if you go with completely updating the dryer wiring from the breaker outward...I recommend an electrician do this work for you (it's about an hour's work...plus materials). Then your exisiting dryer's 4 wire 4 prong cord can stay as is....the electrician will install a 4 prong receptacle made to fit your cord.

If you go with simply replacing the dryer's cord....changing it to a 3 wire so it will fit the receptacle...make sure the ground strap is re-utilized as seen in the images at the site above.(also make sure all work is done with the dryer breaker (or fuse if a really old home) off before starting any work. If you change the cord yourself...make sure to reconnect in exactly the same manner as the previous cord was connected...(make a note on paper or take pictures so that there are no mistakes)..and that you tighten the nuts securely to the posts once the wire lugs are on them. Where you state you do not have a background in electrical work...you can have an electrician change this cord for you...(typically in under a half-hour)....or you can do it yourself - by carefully following the pictures.

The choice is yours...if it was me - I'd change the wiring from the breaker outward...making the older home meet today's current Codes and be complaint for this dryer..and then you wouldn't need to change a thing on the dryer....but you can go either way....Codes allow this grandfathering in older homes with existing wiring.

Feb 09, 2010 | Dryers

2 Answers

Frigidaire GLEQ2152ES Dryer Won't Power UP


IF you find that you have only a 3 wire feed for this dryer (and the reason for the 3 prong receptacle)...then you can not properly install a 4 prong dryer cord to it. You now have 2 choices....either rewire (assuming that it is a 3 wire supply) the entire run from the dryer breaker to the outlet location with 4 wire (typically a run of 8/3 with ground having a black, red, white and bare ground)and install a 4 prong dryer receptacle to match the configuration of the new dryers cord.....OR - you can remove the 4 wire cord and replace it with a 3 wire cord....re-using the ground strap - IF it is still in place.

895cfdc.jpg

Jul 11, 2009 | Frigidaire Dryers

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