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Dryer housing gets hot when the dryer is plugged in

3 wire cord with three wire receptacle... the dryer housing heats up with the dryer NOT running...the cycle dial is in the on position but the dryer is not loaded with clothes or running and the entire housing gets the four wire set-up the cure for this problem....OR......????

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Re: dryer housing gets hot when the dryer is plugged in

If the dryer is gas then a 110 ac volt plug is sufficient. If it is an electric dryer than it would be 220 ac volt wich is a four prong plug, a common with a L1 L2 and ground. If it is in the USA (im in canada) they may if memory serves use common for ground. what ever the drier plug was when first manufactured is what you want to use. It sounds like there is a short to ground (common/nuetral) from the element. when the timer is in the on possition power from one side of the circuit is present. when you start the drier with the start switch it provides contact to the other side of the circuit. check the element and that should be your problem.

Posted on Sep 26, 2007

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Re: dryer housing gets hot when the dryer is plugged in

I am not sure how old this Post is as there is no date. Anyway here goes this is what I found wrong with my Kenmore Dryer 110 64112200 would not heat correctly and we quit using it. The Motor Your Dryer uses is the same as mine on all these different forums and sites say You need a motor. Alternating Current Squirrel cage motors are very robust and unless locked up or a open wire coil they work, now that being said the Bottom wire on My motor plug is Red and is connecting L1 and L2 to turn on the Heating Element when the Centrifugal Motor switch is Released because the motor is up to Speed (Turning the Drum) I removed the Motor and opened the black Plug on the Motor the Switchable Contacts inside for the Heater element on the Bottom were fused together. This Condition caused my Heater Element to come on As Soon As I Plugged the Dryer in, caused the timer to tick and it also caused the motor to hum upon pushing the start Button and me having to help the motor start (Spin the Drum By Hand). The Motor would let the Drum stop as soon as the you put any clothes in the drum. The Reason is because since the Red Heater Element Wire Contacts were Welded together in the Motor Plug, when the Centrifugal switch on the motor shaft would release the switch it could not close the contacts for the Motor START Capacitor (the reason that the motors Hums, it can't start). Without the Start Capacitor the AC Motor can not start so it just hums unless you help it. Now also since I Broke the Fused contacts apart again the Motor can start and I Can not stop the Drum Motor Works Fine and the Heater element works Fine. Just some Information the Motor Centrifugal (Fly Weights) Switch is a Double Gang Switch so the motor can start, come up to speed and at the same time Close the Heater Element circuit. Hope this helps Somebody.

Posted on Nov 10, 2014

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Dryer doesnt heat L1 to N is 120/ L2 to N is 3?/ L1 to L2 is 30???

Electric dryers are 240 volt. You must have a 30 amp 240v receptacle to plug it into. The cord on the dryer must have a compatible plug.
The circuit should not be shared with anything else, and should be protected with a 2-pole 30 amp circuit breaker.

It is possible for only one side of a 2-pole breaker to pop. When that happens one of the "hot" terminals would be dead and would account for the weird voltage readings you're getting which are just stray voltages from the one good side bleeding back. So Check your breaker first. You should get 120v on each terminal of the breaker and 240v between them. The cable leading from it should be 3-wire (red, black, white). It may, or may not, also have a seperate (bare) ground wire.

Then check voltages at the receptacle. You should get 120v between each hot side and the neutral, and 240v between the two hot terminals. If not, then check the wiring connections at the breaker and at the receptacle. Switch off the main breaker (or pull the disconnect) before doing that.

If voltages OK at the receptacle, but not at the control board then replace the power cord.

The ground wire should be fastened to a cold water pipe with a clamp designed for that purpose unless your power cord and receptacle have a separate (4th) terminal for the ground.

Apr 15, 2014 | Whirlpool Dryers

1 Answer

Three prong to 4 prong outlet

Yes it can be. I suggest you get a licensed electrician to handle it.

Jan 27, 2013 | Bosch Nexxt 500 Dryer

1 Answer

Dryer has a 3 wire cord, house has a 4 wire receptacle, what should be done???

Here is a tip that will help you with changing your dryer plug. Dryer Cord and Wiring Dryer 3 Wire or 4 Wire


Sep 21, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

I have a hotpoint dryer that has a fire wire plug connected to it. The house i have now has a three prong receptacle on the wall. Can i just buy a three prong receptacle and tape off the extra red wire.

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Here is a tip that will help you with changing your dryer plug.

Dryer Cord and Wiring Dryer 3 Wire or 4 Wire


Aug 29, 2010 | Hotpoint Dryers

1 Answer

New house has three prong recpticle dryer cord has four prongs. Can I use a three prong cord and strap a wire to the fourth wire on back of dryer? If not got a solution?

If the new house has an existing three-wire outlet, the simplest solution is to install a 3-prong power cord on your dryer. The following link explains the differences between a 3-wire and 4-wire configuraiton:

So...if you need to install a 3 prong power cord, it should be wired as follows:

WHITE (NEUTRAL) 0 VAC to WHITE - a Ground wire needs to be connected to the Neutral lead at the terminal block and grounded to the dryer cabinet.

The other alternative would require you to install a 4-wire receptacle so you could still use your current power cord. A certified electrician is recommended for this job and may cost you some money. A replacement power cord, on the other hand, usually costs less than $20 and can be found ay any hardware store.

If you have any questions, please post back and let me know. I hope you find this information helpful.

Jun 10, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

My friend has dryer #LER4634JQ1,has had problems with power to the home,electician states one side of electric panel not getting current.Dryer has power,tumbles but won't heat,heating element tested OK....

Yes, an electric dryer requires 220VAC in order to heat.

I would recommend you begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). IMPORTANT: If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good at the terminal block with the dryer plugged in, you have an internal electrical problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord. Replacement power cords can be purchased at any hardware store for about $20.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, which is tapped off the input voltage. The heating circuits require the full 220-240VAC in order to work. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer will run, but won't heat.

Perform these steps and post back and let me know if you need further assistance. I hope this helps you.

Mar 11, 2010 | Whirlpool LER4634J Electric Dryer

1 Answer

I am changing the 4 wire on my 2 yr old maytag dryer to a 3 wire to fit the recptical in my new house. Other then the 2 hots and 1 neutral connection, my dryer also has a white ground wire off to the side,...

So you have an, ahem... have a Code compliant dryer (with it's 4 wire cord and plug)....and have moved into an older home that is not Code compliant (with it's 3 prong receptacle outlet)....and this is fairly common.

At this point - you have two choices....replace the wiring from the dryer's breaker to the receptacle with all new 8/3 with ground romex (it more then likely only has 8/2 with ground now)....and replace the receptacle with a 4 prong grounding receptacle to match your dryer's cord....OR - as an alternative - you can replace the cord on your dryer with a 3 prong cord to match the existing dryer receptacle outlet.

Out of the 2 choices....the first one will bring the old wiring in the home up to current Codes (all NEW homes must have this 4 wire/4 prong set-up per Code...but older homes are grand-fathered)...but it is clearly the most involved, time consuming and most costly approach...and it is recommended only an electrician do this work. If this approach is taken....your dryer cord can stay as will now fit the new receptacle outlet with no modifications.

The second approach - is to pick up a 3 wire 3 prong cord at your local hardware store to match the existing 3 prong receptacle.....and replace the 4 wire cord on your dryer with it. Although this is the least desireable - it is an allowed approach because this is an older home with existing wiring. This is a much less involved approach...all you need to buy is the 3 wire dryer cord (they come all ready to go) remove the 4 wire cord and install the 3 wire cord to your electrical connections at the back of the dryer. Hopefully...when the 4 wire cord was installed on your dryer, the ground strap wasn't removed completely (this is a metal strap that will connect the white wire to the metal frame of the dryer)...because now you will need to re-use the ground strap. For more on this....see the images of the differences of the 3 wire and 4 wire dryer hook-up at:

NOTE: the only real difference between the 3 wire cord and the 4 wire cord is now the white neutral and the ground are kept seperate in a 4 wire..the green ground will connect directly to the dryer frame....where in a 3 wire there is no seperate ground wire - ground and neutral are one and the same...the ground strap connects the frame to the white neutral. The 4 wire permits a better safety the event of an electrical problem (ground fault) in the dryer...the fault now has a seperate path to your panel's ground...and less chance of a shock from touching the metal frame of the dryer.

The choice of how to proceed is up to you....if you go with completely updating the dryer wiring from the breaker outward...I recommend an electrician do this work for you (it's about an hour's materials). Then your exisiting dryer's 4 wire 4 prong cord can stay as is....the electrician will install a 4 prong receptacle made to fit your cord.

If you go with simply replacing the dryer's cord....changing it to a 3 wire so it will fit the receptacle...make sure the ground strap is re-utilized as seen in the images at the site above.(also make sure all work is done with the dryer breaker (or fuse if a really old home) off before starting any work. If you change the cord yourself...make sure to reconnect in exactly the same manner as the previous cord was connected...(make a note on paper or take pictures so that there are no mistakes)..and that you tighten the nuts securely to the posts once the wire lugs are on them. Where you state you do not have a background in electrical can have an electrician change this cord for you...(typically in under a half-hour)....or you can do it yourself - by carefully following the pictures.

The choice is yours...if it was me - I'd change the wiring from the breaker outward...making the older home meet today's current Codes and be complaint for this dryer..and then you wouldn't need to change a thing on the dryer....but you can go either way....Codes allow this grandfathering in older homes with existing wiring.

Feb 19, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

Replacing eletrical cord to a four prong cord. there are only three connections. there are no color codes to make it easier. How do I replace the cord

Dryers are 220 Volts AC and the outer connections inside the dryer are "hot" or live legs (black or black and red wires) of the circuit, while the center one is typically the neutral (white) wire.

The difference between a 3 prong plug and receptacle and a 4 pronged one is simply that the 4 prong plug and receptacle has a dedicated ground integrated into it, whereas the 3 prong plug is what's commonly referred to as an ungrounded circuit. There is no dedicated ground in a 3 prong plug and receptacle that makes a separate, grounded connection from the dryer to the receptacle to the electrical panel of the house.

Also, please look at either the back of the dryer for a basic wiring diagram, or look inside the access panel where the dryer cord is connected. There should be indications as to what each terminal is for, as I stated, typically the outer connections are the "hot" while the center one is typically the neutral. If you notice a strap running from one of the dryer's connection terminals to the cabinet/frame of the dryer, that is the neutral. The others are the hot terminals, which are the outside ones.

Look for a green grounding screw inside the dryer's electrical connection section. That is where the green wire on the cordset would be connected/terminated.

If you wish, you can get a free Installation Guide for your dryer at the following link to download and/or print out at:

It will show you the connections for both a 3 and 4 wire cordset.

Hope you find this Very Helpful and best regards!

Nov 29, 2009 | Maytag Atlantis MDE7400AY Electric Dryer

2 Answers

Installing a four prong plug

best bet would to be to buy a plug that matches your receptical.....this is somthing you do not want to monkey with as if not wired right could turn your dryer into a fire hazzard. white to white green to green black to black and the other wire goes to earth ground for like trailer houses and modular homes.

Nov 23, 2009 | Whirlpool Dryers

2 Answers

Whirlepool electric dryer stopped heating.

This could definitely cause a dryer no heat problem and a potential house fire. Purchase a new dryer cord and replace it. The following link explains how:

Follow the 3-prong wire color code provided. If the new dryer cord does not have any colors (all gray) simply make sure the center conductor gets connected to neutral (WHITE) at the terminal block on the back of the dryer. There should also be a grounding strap or ground wire (GREEN) attached to the neutral at the temrinal block. Each outer wire will then get connected to either of the two hot (RED and BLACK) terminals.

The reason your dryer still may tumble in spite of a bad dryer cord is because the drive motor only uses 110-120VAC while the heating circuits require the full 220 service. If one of the dryer cord conducters is burned in half, you may only be getting half your input voltage to the dryer. A voltage reading across the two hot terminals (left and right slots) at the wall receptacle should read 220-240VAC. You should also read this same voltage across the red and black wires at the terminal block. If not, you have a bad cord.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I hope this helps you.

Jul 29, 2009 | Whirlpool LER5636P Electric Dryer

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