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Bushnel North Star

How come when I look through my telescope all the objects are upside down.Is this nornmal or have I got someting wrong.

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Re: Bushnel North Star

No you do not have anything wrong. When ever light is passed through a lens it is inverted. Binoculars, and land viewing telescopes use a special lens combination or "erecting" prism to flip the image for you. The problem with that is it reduces the amount of light that passes through the telescope. It's not an issue for land viewing because these things tend to be close and bright. For astronomy objects are so faint that you actually get a better view when things are upside down.

Posted on Jan 02, 2008

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Why when I look through my telescope it's upside down

The image in astronomical telescopes are naturally upside down. This can be corrected using an inverting eyepiece . The reason this is the case, is that normally when viewing astronomical objects it doesn't matter if the image is upside down, so to minimise the loss of light that is the more important issue, unnecessary optical surfaces are eliminated. Terrestrial telescopes do naturally have inverting eyepieces as people expect to see objects the right way up.
Getting and inverting eyepiece will be cheaper the changing telescopes! :) Your eyes see everything upside down too, but your brain turns the image the right way up. The image in cameras is also upside down at the image plane, but the electronics turn it the right way up for you.

Jan 02, 2015 | Telescopes


You Just Bought an EQUATORIAL Telescope Mount!

Even though we warned you not to do this, you bought one anyway! Beginners should never buy an EQ telescope mount as their first telescope. It's too late now; so I guess we will need to teach you how to use it!

Equatorial mounts move in a way that seems not to very intuitive. Unlike the easy Alt AZ mount which moves up and down and left and right, the EQ mounted telescope seems to move in TWO dissimilar directions at the same time.

Additionally you must first polar align the mount on the North star Polaris before you can use it. SEE! we told you not to buy it!

Here are the steps to roughly polar align the telescope so you can use it. If it is motorized the single Right Ascension motor will keep the sky object inside the eyepiece for long periods of time. If you do not have a Right Ascension motor, the slow motion RA knob can be slowly turned to keep the sky object centered in the eyepiece.

Begin by leveling the mount and tripod. Move the entire mount and tripod so it is pointing roughly to North, as close as possible using the steps below or a compass. Don't forget to adjust for your magnetic deviation. My location's compass reading is about 5 degrees away from true North. This is called magnetic deviation. You can find your location's deviation on the internet. Then proceed with the steps below.

First, adjust the Declination to the latitude for your observing site. Declination is the angle that the scope is pointing UP, and it's the same as your latitude. For example Dallas, Texas is about 32 degrees North latitude, adjust the scope so the small indicator reads 32 degrees. By the way, the North star in Dallas, TX is about 32 degrees above the horizon. Your latitude matches the elevation of Polaris (the North star) above the horizon.

Second, either look through the polar alignment scope buried in the axis of the telescope mount, or look along side the axis, and get the star Polaris lined up in the cross-hair of the polar alignment scope, or as best you can by looking along the side of the mount axis, or lining it up using your compass.. This will put the scope to within about 3/4 of 1 degree of the TRUE North celestial sphere. This is good enough for VISUAL observation, but NOT good enough to do astro-photography..

Adjust the DECLINATION up or down, and move the entire mount left or right until you can see Polaris as indicated above, or it is lined up as close as possible.

Now you are roughly polar aligned. Now you can move the tube around by loosening the Right Ascension lock, and or the Declination lock until your sky object appears in the small finder scope mounted on top of the main telescope tube.(DO NOT MOVE THE MOUNT, and the counter weight should never be higher than the telescope tube) Lock down the scope in both axis and use the fine adjustment RA and DEC knobs to center the target. Again, DO NOT move the mount or tripod. The mount should still be pointing at Polaris.

This web site illustrates this procedure:

also this web site

You should be able to keep an object within the field of view of the eyepiece by slowing turning the Right Ascension slow motion control knob-------- IF you are actually accurately polar aligned. Small adjustments may also be needed with the DEC slow motion knob since you are not exactly polar aligned using this rough alignment technique.

However it can be used successfully for visual observation. Your scope will now track the motion of the stars as they move across the sky.

Hope that helps you!

Clear Skies!

on Dec 29, 2009 | Telescopes

1 Answer

Hello, I m using the 60700 Telescope but the image i see in lens is very blurred, i assembled my telescope as per Manuel instruction but still i see upside down image with blurred effects. I tried several...

All astronomical telescopes show upside down and or inverted images-- it's normal nothing is wrong. You are applying too much magnification. Do not use the 2x barlow-- and start practicing how to focus using only the eyepiece with the largest number written on it which is your LOWEST power.

You can practice focusing during the daytime on a distant object like a telephone pole or a building.

Jul 29, 2011 | C-Star Optics 60700 (60x700) Telescope

1 Answer

We are trying to test out viewing land based objects using the 30X eyepiece, which according to the instructions, should appear right side up and not upside down! This is not happening.

It's NOT really a problem. ALL reflector style telescopes show upside down images. This will not affect your star gazing since there is no UP OR DOWN in outer space. Read my tips on my profile page.

You can buy an "erecting diagonal" for terrestrial viewing- BUT this is not what an astronomical telescope is actually used for.

So align the small finder scope on a distant object like the top of a telescope pole during the day time. Point the main tube at the pole and get the tip top in the main tube's eyepiece. Without moving the telescope adjust the crosshairs on the finder scope on the exact same spot. The moon should be your first target at night and you can check and refine the finder scope on the moon.

Mar 12, 2011 | Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope 60% OFF w/...

1 Answer

I have just bought an Astrolon telescope 288 power. I've assembled it following the instructions and I can't see anything. Inside the house I can pick few images but they appear upside down rather than...

All astronomical telescopes show upside down images --- it's normal.

Stars are always points of light no matter what telescope you own. Download this star chart:

Objects in the sky are tiny, smaller than the tip of your finger held at arm's length, try for the moon FIRST which is large. Then try Jupiter which is that very bright "star" to the Southeast after dark.

Read my tips on my profile page.

Dec 26, 2010 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

1 Answer

I have a tasco galaxsee 45-114375 and misplaced my manua. l My image is upside down, how can I change that?

All astronomical telescopes have upside down images. It's perfectly normal.

You can buy an "erecting prism" for terrestrial viewing.

Here is one:

The manual will only have assembly instructions. It will not tell you how to use the scope or how to find objects in the night sky. Read my TIPS on my profile page-- a free monthly star chart is available here:

Aug 14, 2010 | Tasco Galaxsee 46114375 (375 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

View upside down

There is nothing wrong. All astronomical telescope show object as upside down. There is no up or down in space!

Sep 01, 2008 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

How do you use the red dot finder? and when I look throught the format eyepiece everything is upside down.... Thank you Stacie

Astronomical telescopes show all objects upside down and reversed-- this is not a problem; there is no up or down in space.

The red dot finder helps you point the telescope-- focus on a distant object and center it in the eyepiece.

Without moving the telescope -- adjust the red dot onto the object. Now you can use the finder to locate objects.

Apr 13, 2008 | Bushnell Voyager 78-9945 Telescope

1 Answer

Bushnell 565

There are a few basic things to be aware of.
  1. This is an astronomical telescope so there is no erecting lens combination. So, everything you look at will be upside down.
  2. As a refracting telescope you have virtually no maintenance. A good thing.
  3. This telescope has an equatorial mount. Basically the mount corrects for the off-axis spin of the earth. The quick and dirty way to align the scope is to set position on the mount to 0hrs and 90 degrees. Make sure you are setup on a level surface and then rotate the entire telescope and tripod so that it faces north. Depending on your Latitude and longitude Polaris or the north start will appear higher or lower in the sky. Polaris is called the north star because it is within 1degree of the true north and it is always in the same spot throughout the night and year. The mount will have a third adjustment point near the base to adjust for the apparent change in position caused by the curvature of the earth. Once it is lined up try pointing the telescope at a bright star. The smaller the mm number on the eyepiece the higher the magnification. The beauty of an equatorial mount is that once you have it properly aligned on an object you only have to adjust on axis to keep the object in view.
I could write pages on this please re-post with some more specific questions and I will try my best to answer them for you. Good luck and happy star hopping.

Jan 02, 2008 | Telescopes

1 Answer

Bushnel North Star

Hello !
I had the same trouble. It's normal, you just have to put a lens to straight the image (it's use for terrestrial view).

Sep 24, 2007 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8890 (300 x 90mm)...

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