Question about Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Light meter failure and shutter button sticking

The camera has been sparingly used in the last couple of years. Recently I put in new batteries and the camera worked normally. Since coming up to the mountains (from 100 ft altitude to about 5,000 ft)the light meter stopped functioning and after taking about 20 frames the film advance lever started to slip occasionally and then finally stopped altogether. What's to be done?

Posted by on

1 Answer

Re: light meter failure and shutter button sticking

Set your camera to B and release the shutter ( camera will work in this mode without batteries ) if you can wind ok and release shutter fine then all you need is new batteries. If however your camera is not working when set to B then it is either the shutter or the transport mechanism that need looking at. From experience ( have repaired 100s of Me-supers ) it is likely that your shutter needs attention : rubber components ( and foam rubber ) inside the shutter ( and the mirror box locking mechanism especially ) have perished and need replacing.

Posted on Sep 23, 2007

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

The light meter does not light up. I've put 2 new batteries in. The shutter works and the camera worked perfectly when i put it in storage 10 years ago. How do i get the light meter to work?

First off, did you store it with batteries installed? If so, check the compartment to be sure there's no corrosion on the contacts. If there is, a pencil eraser works well to clean it off - I don't recommend using any sort of liquid since it can seep into the inside.

If that's not the issue, I can't remember if the ME Super is a mechanical or electronic shutter. Does the shutter function, without any batteries installed? If so, it's mechanical and will not depend on batteries, and therefore there is really no way to narrow down the cause of the issue beyond a good cleaning.

If on the other hand it will not function without batteries, but is with them, you know the power system is working, and the meter itself is the issue. It'll require a technican to open the camera and hunt down the exact cause. Cost for an estimate most places is around $35, if you don't have a local shop, KEH Camera which has a website is very good,

You can of course just use the camera without a working meter. Handheld meters can be picked up from $10-400 online (ebay and others), or you can guesstimate your exposures if using print film using the tried and tested "sunny-16" rule of exposure.

Sep 08, 2011 | Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

We put new batteries in a Nikon EM and the light does not come on when battery is check...they are in correctly. Does anyone know how a light meter can get broken?

The battery check is by pressing a very small silver button on the top plate by the shutter release and the little red light come on right? there is only two small button batteries in the EM but without them it's a brick. So look inside the battery compartment and at the bottom you will see a spring piece of metal which the batter makes contact with. If it is corroded then you will have to clean that off to make contact again. Take a new pencil with a new unused red rubber eraser and form a piece of sand paper over the end of the pencil and tape it securely. Lightly twist the pencil back and forth between your fingers to sand off the corrosion, make it shinny. Blow out the dusty dirty stuff with a puffer make sure the batteries are installed correctly. Yes I know you said the batteries were in the right way install the batteries check wiht the battery test button. Also don't forget the EM is a totally battery dependent camera for the meter AND the meter will not work until you have the frame counter at frame # 1 and beyond. My Nikon EM has been slightly modified yours might not be the same but I can close the back and advance the lever trip the shutter and again until it reaches frame one and then the light meter works. Cheers great little camera hope you get it working

Jan 21, 2011 | Nikon FE 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I installed new batteries in my camera. I turn the on knob and camera does not operate. Something wrong with power system Contacts are clean, new batteries Nikon N2020

"Turn the on knob"? You turn on the N2020 by lightly pressing the shutter release button. Do the meter indicator LEDs inside the viewfinder light up when you lightly press the shutter release button?

Dec 26, 2010 | Nikon N2020 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

No lights come on when i put batteries in! does it need to be repaired and where can i send it?

First, make sure that the batteries are the correct SR44 type (LR44's work as well but give incorrect and inconsistent light metering).

Also make sure that they're loaded the right way around; I don't remember which way up they go but the camera works one way and is dead the other way so if in doubt, try both ways.

With the batteries correctly loaded, the film advance lever must be in the "stand-off" position; this means that the lever sticks out backwards a little allowing the tip of your thumb to just hook in front of it. Note that when the lever is pushed all the way to the resting position the camera will be swirtched off and the shutter button locked to prevent it from firing by accident.

Now press the shutter button slightly to turn the light meter on and look into the viewfinder; one of three lights should illuminate, +, 0 or - . if they don't light then the batteries are dead or loaded incorrectly, or you have a faulty camera.

If you have a faulty example then repairs are not a DIY prospect and spares are as rare as fresh dodo doo-doos. About the only thing you can check is that the battery terminals are bright and clean. If the camera remains broken then the good news is that there are millions more 35mm film SLR's available and many of them are completely free as all but a few top-end models are near worthless these days: I've never paid for any 35mm cameras or lenses in about six years thanks to FreeCycle and Freegle.

Mar 15, 2010 | Ricoh KR-5 SUPER II 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Nikon F3's light meter always underexposed

needs repairing at a qualified shop
when was it last cleaned or serviced ?
if you think the camera is worthy, since its old how much is it worth to you vs a new one

Mar 06, 2010 | Nikon F3/T 35mm SLR Camera

3 Answers

I haven't used my camera for 10 years. The light

Hello...Just to warn might have a fistful of problems there but I'm going to have you check a few things FIRST!! Before you try anything with new batteries, check the contacts inside the little battery chamber...look for any discoloration(might indicate some corrosion goin on). Use a pencil eraser to gently but firmly rub the contact clean. Next, put the shutter selector in the "b" position in order to manually dry-fire the unit at least 50 to 100 times without the lens attached. Cameras DO NOT like to sit idle--grease stiffens, oil evaporates or becomes thicker, springs "form" to their rest positions, etc. You need to work that camera and hopefully things will still operate--namely some electro-mechanical switches inside! Besides the meter not operating, does the shutter hold any of the slower speeds--1/60 thru 1 sec? These are battery functions--the whole metering system controls a couple of tiny magnets to give you the speeds. I can assure you of one thing--you're going to have to have the camera cleaned and adjusted(called an "overhaul") because the springs that operate the shutter have worn due to age and need to be adjusted.The two sections of shutter blades need to move inside a narrow range of speed so the actual shutter speeds will be accurate. Also, be SURE to check the lens glass CAREFULLY under a bright light--when cameras and lenses are put away for long periods, an insidious fungus just loves to attach itself to the *inside* of tasty, high quality glass elements causing weird, spider-web lines and spots. These will almost certainly cause blurred spots or shadows in pix. Additionally, check the diaphragm blades *carefully* for a wet-looking substance around the edges. That's grease that has migrated from the focusing barrel, down the metal surfaces, and stuck to the thin, metal blades. Check the movement by turning the F-stop ring on the lens--make sure the blades move very freely. DON'T FORCE THE RING if it feels slightly "gummy"--The F-stop ring should move freely and have "sharp" stops at each of the F positions. If you force things, you could easily damage the blades internally. Hope I helped you get things "motivated"<grin>. Good luck!---Rick

Sep 21, 2009 | Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I followed the instructions in the manual, and put new batteries in + side up. Then I continued with the rest of that step, but I did not see a flashing red LED light anywhere. I do not understand what to...

A few things to try, based on my FG's operation: - The most obvious- are your batteries good? Correct type? If they are: - When all is well the red LED metering lights will appear in the viewfinder window on the right side, in the range of shutter speed numbers. - The red LED metering lights are only activated when you press the shutter release button (halfway). The lights go out after a few seconds if the shutter button is not held down. Just tap the shutter button to reactivate them. - The shutter speed setting dial must NOT be on B (Bulb) or M90 (non-electronic Manual mode) if you want to see the red LED metering lights. The lights do not operate on these two settings because metering is irrelevant here (you'd be doing the metering, not the camera). - If you're in P (Program mode) the lens aperture must be set all the way to the smallest setting (usually f22 or f16, depending on the lens). If not, you'll only see blinking lights at the top and bottom of the shutter speed range on the right in the viewfinder. That's a reminder to set the lens to the smallest (highest numeric) aperture.
Hope these help. The FG is a great little camera.

Aug 14, 2009 | Nikon FG 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Sticky shutter blades

Canon EOS cameras manufactured in the late 1980s to early 1990s have an internal foam bumper for the shutter curtain which deteriorates with time, breaking down into an oily black tar. The tar oozes down and gets onto the shutter blades, causing them to stick. This results in the shutter either failing to open altogether or opening too slowly, resulting in blank or unexposed photographs.
cleaning procedure. Take a cotton swab and put a tiny bit of isopropyl alcohol or lighter fluid on it. Don’t drench it - you just want it slightly moist. Rub the tip of the swab on the oily patch, back and forth extremely lightly. You don’t want to apply any pressure, as the shutter curtain is fragile and easily bent and destroyed. Keep lightly rubbing the swab back and forth until the oil is entirely gone. Alcohol is a weaker solvent and so it may take a minute or two of gentle movement to dissolve the oil. Remember to do both sides of the shutter - you’ll have to move the mirror upwards to get the inner side, so don’t get any fingerprints on it. The easiest way to do this is to set the camera into mirror lockup mode (assuming your camera has the ability) and starting the self-timer.
That should fix the camera for the time being. Of course, the foam bumper is still there and continuing to degrade, so you’ll have to do this cleaning every now and again unless you pay to have it replaced. How often depends on your camera. Mine has gone for a year since the last cleaning without problems.

May 24, 2009 | Canon EOS Elan 7ne 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Chronic sticking shutter on older Nikon

If the shutter doesn't stick on the M90 position, the problem is electronic. If it does, the issue is mechanical. Try the battery check. Hold it for a few seconds. If the LED goes out, the issue is most likely with the batteries. Use really fresh, top quality batteries. Use only silver oxide batteries, not the alkalines that are often substituted.

Mar 19, 2009 | Nikon FE 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Shutter staying open and only closing when dial moved to M90 or B

It sounds like your cameras need a CLA (clean, lube and adjustment). Occasionally when this has happened to me, i noticed that it was the foam on the mirror bumper that had gotten all deteriorated and gummy and as such the mirror would 'stick' to it when it flipped up. Changing the foam seals might do the trick.

Switching to M90 means that the camera is in Manual mode whereby it is not relying on the electronics at all in the camera. When your battery dies in mid shoot, you switch to M90 and you shoot manually at a fixed speed of 1/90 second. Of course your light meter won't have power, but if you meter manually or go by the 'Sunny 16' rule, you can adjust the aperture and get your shots.

Yes, moving the shutter dial to M90 should release the mirror back down, if it is stuck up.I'm assuming of course that you didn't manually set the mirror up anyway... Test it out with brand new batteries!

Nov 20, 2008 | 35mm SLR Cameras

Not finding what you are looking for?
Pentax ME Super 35mm SLR Camera Logo

Related Topics:

149 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Pentax 35mm SLR Cameras Experts


Level 3 Expert

94039 Answers

Bill Eager

Level 3 Expert

421 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

Are you a Pentax 35mm SLR Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides