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Reading scales of different ranges

I have a new Gw Instek GVT-417B AC millivoltmeter. How do you read the scales ? With meter on the 1v range its fine. Now if I change to the 300mV range to I have to do some calculations. I have a digital meter I am comparing the readings to I can't get them to match. The Instek owners manual can be found here (not much to it )http://www.instek.com/html/en/downloadsearch-e.asp. Thanks

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  • calman46 Apr 18, 2009

    so if the needle is at .46 (outer scale, I'm reading that right I hope) . It would be 0.46 x.3 =138mV which is close to the digital meter. How do you increase the multiplier for the ranges ? and when do you use the inter scale it starts at a .5 Thanks

  • calman46 Apr 18, 2009

    I'm checking the frequency response of my recapped Pioneer RT 909 reel to reel with an MRL calibration tape. The test tones should have a output voltage around 14X mV's . When I play the reference fluxivity tone 1kHz@ 0db with the meter on the 1v scale 0db the meter reads 450mv .Now I switch to 300mV -10db which test tones are -10db the meter reads 450mV ,what you told me works 450x0.3 =135mV and the digital meter had 140mV My question is if I use .3 for the 300mV scale what do I use for he other scales? You only read directly from scale on 1v 0db scale ? do you have calulate the other ranges? The meters are working fine I'm just not getting it

  • calman46 Apr 19, 2009

    it seems the meter always shows the 1v range on the outer scale. For the other scales (I have only tested this on the 300mV range) you used the inner scale. The meter read .470 outerdial x.3 =141 thats what I have on the inner dial. I'm not sure if i have the decimal points correct. 300mV is 0.003v not .3 . I think it might be something like .470v x.003v =.00141v = 141mV

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If a meter does work on 1V scale and returns incorrect on 300mV , then the 300mv resistor is bad, but this happens very rarely.
The meter is probably fine, when a voltmeter is broken usually it just does not read on any scale. , or read nothing on one scale. Probably you are not reading the 300mv scale. When you set 300mv Vs 1 V you must multiply values times 3/10, I am sure that the multimeter is OK, and calculations are probably wrong, or you are reading a value that is out of range.

Posted on Apr 18, 2009

  • Ginko
    Ginko Apr 18, 2009

    Re: How do you increase the multiplier for the ranges ? and when do you use the inter scale it starts at a .5 Thanks.

    The multiplier for the ranges is the scale itself, the scale is selected and operated using the wheel on front.

    This is also a precision instrument with a very wide range, and it can read on scales from the 300 micro volt unit up to 100V unit scale.

    The greek letter mu before Volt also does not indicates a millivolt (mv), but a microvolt (µV). The 300µV scale is three hundreds micro volts. where each micro volt is one milionesim of volt, and not one millesim, that is the reason why your calculations did not match.

    The scale that you chose depends on what you need to test. This instrument is very precise, and can be used to perform tests that are outside ordinary conditions. For example by setting 100 V scale you can read an 80K volt circuit. You will not use a 300µV scale, or the 100V scale in normal circumstances. Scales that are used on regular practice vary between .001 Volts to 1 Volt scale.

  • Ginko
    Ginko Apr 18, 2009

    Re: play the reference fluxivity tone 1kHz@ 0db with the meter on the 1v
    scale 0db the meter reads 450mv .Now I switch to 300mV -10db which test
    tones are -10db the meter reads 450mV

    That means that this multimeter is returning always the absulute voltage value, and not scaled.

    I was wrong in my first comment, I thought you had a multimeter returning the scaled value.

    It will be useful to know what reading did not match with the other digital multimeter, and in what scale. Same as your description reported above.

    Thanks.


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How to use


Voltage testers and volt meters are two different things. A meter will provide a an indication of the exact voltage and type AC or DC. A tester on the other hand simply provides an indication of presence of power with little to no indication of how much or type.

AC power is what is provided by most power companies in the world. DC is a type of power provided by batteries and DC power supplies. If your tester or meter has provisions to check for AC and DC, you should check for BOTH. If AC power is present and you are have set your meter to test for DC power, your meter will indicate 0 volts. You can see this can be a dangerous condition. Most simple testers will not care if AC or DC power is being tested and the types that use neon lamps will usually glow differently for AC and DC power.

When setting up for testing voltage, you must test across the power source (or in "parallel") or load (such as a light bulb), as opposed to "in series" with the power source. Across would be from the + to - post of a battery, into the slots of an outlet, etc. "In series" is when the tester would be completing a circuit - such as testing across an open switch.

First, check the meter's operation by testing a known good power source by following the next steps. Set the meter for the type power to be tested. Choose AC if unsure. Next, set the meter for the highest voltage range supported. Make sure this range is higher than the expected voltage, otherwise damage to the meter may result. Connect the probes to the power source. Read the meter. If the meter moved only slightly, adjust the range of the meter to the next lower value. You can keep adjusting downward as needed to get the most precise reading possible - but do not set the range to a value less than the voltage present. A 0-300 volt scale is the lowest to measure a 240 volt outlet - switching to a 0 - 150 volt scale will damage the meter. The 0 - 150 volt scale would be fine for measuring 120 volt outlets.

If the meter did not move, change the type from AC to DC. and repeat. If it still does not work, the meter is not working correctly (if testing a know good source) or there is no power present (if the meter worked on a known good power source).

Good luck!

May 12, 2012 | Measuring Tools & Sensors

1 Answer

Battery not charging on 1992 stcfx


To check the charging system, you need a DVOM (Digital Volt Ohm Meter). Make sure the battery is fully charged or you'll get a bad reading. With the battery fully charged, connect the meter "across" the battery but connecting the meter's red lead to the positive battery post and the black lead to the battery negative post. Put the meter's function selection switch in DC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Your meter should read 14.5 to 15.0 volts.

If it does not, you need to check the alternator output. Find the plug in the lower front of the engine case where the regulator wires plug into the engine. Unplug the plug and look into the engine side of the plug. There are two metal contacts inside the plug. These metal plugs are where we are going to put our meter probes to test the output. Put on probe on each metal plug. It makes no difference which probe goes where just don't let them touch the engine case or each other. Put the meter's function selector switch in AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE . Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Touch the meter probes to the two metal plugs in the engine case. Your meter should read 30 volts or greater.

If the alternator does not read thirty volts, make sure you meter is in the AC VOLT scale and you've got good contact on the metal plugs in the engine. If you still don't read at least 30 volts, you stator is bad and must be replaced. If you 30 volts or more but you don't have the 14 volts at the battery, the regulator is probably bad. Make sure the regulator is grounded properly.

Good luck
Steve

Mar 17, 2011 | Harley Davidson FXST Softail Standard...

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New batterie new negative wire new posative wire but wont charge . are there any reiays or fuses causing this problem?


You need to check the output of your alternator. You'll need a DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) to check the outputs.

First connect the meter across your battery. Red meter lead to the positive terminal, black meter lead to the negative or a good ground. Put the function selector of your meter in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle, 2000 RPM. Your meter should read 14.5 to 15.0 volts. Turn all lights on and make sure the voltage stays the same.

If your meter reads low in this test, you need to check the output of the stator. On the lower left front of the engine, you'll see a plug where the voltage regulator plugs into the engine case. Unplug this plug and look into the part that is in the engine case. You'll see two metal contacts. These are what you're going to put your meter leads to in this test. Since the voltage is now AC volts, it makes no difference which lead goes to which contact. Put your meter's function selector in AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Insert the meter leads into the contacts. The meter should read at least 30 volts AC voltage here.

If the alternator stator test fails, you need a new stator. If it passes the test but the voltage to the battery is low, you need a new regulator.

If both pass the test, you need to evaluate the current draw of any extra lights or other equipment that you may have put on the bike. If your equipment is drawing more current than the alternator is capable of producing, a slow drawdown of the battery is the results.

Good Luck
Steve

Oct 25, 2010 | 2000 Harley Davidson XL 1200 C Sportster...

1 Answer

Hello i have a 1990 harley davidson softail custom,i've own it for 20 years,i don't think its charging,battery is fairly new when its running and i remove the ground cable it stops dies out i put a test...


Marshall:

First, your battery MUST be fully charged to perform these test. You'll need a good DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) but an analog meter will work. Connect the meter across the battery with the read lead to the positive post and the black meter lead to the negative post. Put the meter's function switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT range. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Your meter should show a slow build up of voltage over about a thirty second period of time. It should read 14.5-15.0 volts.

If not, you'll need to test the alternator. Unplug the regulator at the front of the engine. Look inside the connector in the engine case and you'll see two metal connectors. Put one meter lead into each contact. It makes no difference which lead goes to what connector because we're checking AC voltage. Now, set your meter function switch to AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to high idle. You should read at least 30 volts.

If you read 30 volts or more at the alternator but less than 14 volts at the battery, replace the regulator. Naturally, less than 30 volts at the alternator, replace the stator.

Good Luck
Steve

Oct 14, 2010 | Harley Davidson FLSTC - FLSTCI Heritage...

1 Answer

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First, your battery MUST be fully charged to perform these test. You'll need a good DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) but an analog meter will work. Connect the meter across the battery with the read lead to the positive post and the black meter lead to the negative post. Put the meter's function switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT range. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. Your meter should show a slow build up of voltage over about a thirty second period of time. It should read 14.5-15.0 volts.

If not, you'll need to test the alternator. Unplug the regulator at the front of the engine. Look inside the connector in the engine case and you'll see two metal connectors. Put one meter lead into each contact. It makes no difference which lead goes to what connector because we're checking AC voltage. Now, set your meter function switch to AC VOLTS, 50 VOLT RANGE. Start the engine and bring it to high idle. You should read at least 30 volts.

If you read 30 volts or more at the alternator but less than 14 volts at the battery, replace the regulator. Naturally, less than 30 volts at the alternator, replace the stator

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1 Answer

I have a 2002 supper glide and the other day as I stoped at a light the eng. came on and it stoped running. I tryed to restart it but the battery was dead. After getting it home I charged the battery and...


It sounds like you have a charging system problem. Charge the battery to full charge. Then connect a digital volt ohm meter to the battery. Red meter lead goes to the positive battery post and the black meter lead goes to the negative battery post. Put the meter's function switch in DC VOLTS, 20 VOLT RANGE or greater. Start the engine and bring it to a high idle. The meter should read 14.5-15.0 volts. If not, proceed to the the alternator test.

To test the alternator, find the plug on lower left front of the engine where the voltage regulator plugs in. Unplug the plug. Look inside the plug in the case and you'll see two metal connectors. This is where we're going to test the output of the alternator.

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1 Answer

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Did you change the rotor as well? I've seen several new rotors from Harley that weren't magnetized correctly. Check it using a screwdriver. It should almost take the screwdriver out of your hand, Compare it with your old one.

To test the alternator output, unplug the regulater at the engine case. Look down into the connector at the engine case and you'll see two metal connecors in the plug. Using a digital volt ohm meter, put he meter in AC voltage, 50 volts or greater range. Make sure you meter is in the AC voltage scale or it won't work. Now, start the engine and bring it to high idle. Put one of the meter leads on each of the metal connectors making sure that you don't touch the engine cases with the leads. You should read 32-40 volts. If not, your stator is not generating current.

If you read at least 30 volts here, I'd suspect the regulator is bad.

Good Luck
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1 Answer

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Inspect for loose alternator belt,belt tenstioner.

Loose the belt and check for free play and smooth turning on alternator.

Clean and tighten battery connectors.

Check DC voltage at idle,it should be between 13.8V to 14.2V.

====
For the last test,you may need a helper.

Flip the DVM meter to AC scale to 1V AC resolution to check for damage diodes that can cause AC ripple voltage.

The reading should be under 0.1V AC at 1500-3000 rpm


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1 Answer

How to read the different scale on an ohm meter ,moving the decimal point to get the right value


The setting of the control knob or push button selects the maxmium value it will measure at that setting.If the resistance you are measuring is above this setting you will get an out of range indication.Different units signal this in different ways.
You will then need to move to at least to the next larger number up until you get a number reading.
Hope this helps,Eric

Sep 23, 2009 | Measuring Tools & Sensors

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