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Unusual Power Requirement

Hi! I managed to get my hands on an industrial small form factor motherboard. I have all the components required to get it running... except for power.

It has a female 4 pin (mini/power) din jack, the kind that one often sees on external hard drives as well. What preventing me from using an external HDD adapter is that BOTH of the two live wires (the other two being ground) are 5V. All of the external HDD adapters i've seen have one 5V and one 12V.

So my question is this: would it be safe to get male and female connectors (to make an intermediate hookup) and connect the wires so that both 5V pins on the intermediate draws power off of the single 5V pin on the external HDD adapter? (see lovely ASCII diagram below) The board requires less than 10W and I have some adapters that are 2A and higher for the 5V pin.

||[ <===[ <===|||

||[ - female din on motherboard
<===[ - self-made intermediary with male din on left and female din on right
<===||| - male din on external HDD adapter

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Should not be a problem, the theory here is Volts * Amps =Watts

5V * 2A = 10w

The alternative is to get a LM7505 ($1 or 2) from radioshack or any electronic supply and regulate the 12v down to 5v. its about 1/2 square IC chip.

Pardon my ASCII:
[_]
input 1.7V - 35V ________| | |_____ +5v (+/- 1%)
Pin 1 Pin 3

will accomodate 1 Amp (1.25 if heat sinked) for the CMOS version, slightly higher for the olde r(less effecient) version

The other pin is ground. OF course you will want to check the specs and pin assignment for the brand you buy, these are typical.

TechieJon

Posted on Jul 20, 2009

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Where is used -5v of atx power supply on motherboard asus P4P8X thanks


The amount of current provided at each voltage level is important because of its impact on determining the supply's ability to provide sufficient power for your system. That larger issue is discussed in a separate section. Here are the details on the various voltages provided by today's power supplies:

-12 V: This voltage is used on some types of serial port circuits, whose amplifier circuits require both -12V and +12V. It is not needed on some newer systems, and even on older ones not very much is used, because the serial ports require little power. Most power supplies provide it for compatibility with older hardware, but usually with a current limit of less than 1 A.

-5 V: A now archaic voltage, -5 V was used on some of the earliest PCs for floppy controllers and other circuits used by ISA bus cards. It is usually provided, in small quantity (generally less than 1A), for compatibility with older hardware. Some form factor power supplies such as the SFX no longer bother to supply it (systems using the SFX power supply are intended not to have ISA bus slots).

0 V: Zero volts is the ground of the PC's electrical system, also sometimes called common or (especially in the UK) earth. The ground signals provided by the power supply are used to complete circuits with the other voltages. They provide a plane of reference against which other voltages are measured.

+3.3 V: The newest voltage level provided by modern power supplies, it was introduced with the ATX form factor and is now found on the ATX/NLX, SFX and WTX form factors. It is not found in Baby AT or older form factors. Originally, the lowest regular voltage provided by the power supply was +5 V, which was used to provide power to the CPU, memory, and everything else on the motherboard. Starting with the second generation Pentium chips, Intel went to a reduced 3.3 V voltage, in order to reduce power consumption as the chips got faster. This required motherboard manufacturers to put voltage regulators on their boards to change the +5 V to +3.3 V. The regulators produced a great deal of waste heat and having to do this reduction on the motherboard was very inefficient, so now the power supply provides +3.3 V directly. It is used to run most newer CPUs, as well as some types of system memory, AGP video cards, and other circuits.

+5 V: On older form factor systems (Baby AT and earlier) , this is the voltage used to run the motherboard, the CPU (directly or indirectly) and the vast majority of other components in the system. On newer systems, many of the components, especially the CPU, have migrated to the lower +3.3 V described above, but the motherboard and many of its components still use +5 V.

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I have an Hp m260n. I just need to find out what type of case it has (ATX or uATX).


http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&cc=us&docname=c00026876

Motherboard: ASUS P4SD Motherboard Specifications

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c00022505&lc=en&cc=us&dlc=en#c00022505_doc

Board Form Factor: uATX

uATX stands for Micro-ATX,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MicroATX

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor#Tabular_information

HOWEVER, the Power Supply is an ATX form factor,

http://www.911forpcs.com/hp-media-center-power-supply.html

,of a sort.

Form Factor related directly to desktop computer Motherboards.
Now has 'evolved' to relate to the computer case, and Power Supply.

When referring to a Power Supply, and the ATX form factor; you are not only referring to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case; but also the type of power cables used, and the technology used within.

Size and shape of an ATX power supply is approximately;

6 Inches Wide, 5.5 Inches Long, and 3.5 Inches in Height.
(152.39mm Wide, 139.69mm Long, and 88.89mm in Height)

Power cables included with Power Supply's nowadays, will include all the power cables you'll need, with probably some left over.

HOWEVER, looking at the 'ATX' form factor designated for your computer, to wit from the ad above, it does NOT fit the above size, and shape.

More like 6 Inches Wide, 4 Inches Long, and 3.5 Inches in Height.
Looks like they just crammed everything into one small box.

Remove motherboard, and all internal hardware, into a new computer case?
No prob!

Most Mid-Tower to Full Tower size computer cases, will have a Support Plate that accommodates a Micro-ATX form factor motherboard, OR an ATX form factor motherboard.

Just look at the Support Plate mounting holes.
Ones for a Micro-ATX (uATX) motherboard, will have uATX next to them, or MATX, or mATX.

Ones for an ATX motherboard, will have ATX next to them.

However check the computer case manufacturer info to be sure.

[ The motherboard mounts to a Support Plate.
The Support Plate can be an integral part of the metal frame, of the computer case; or a separate metal plate that attaches to the computer case metal frame ]

Not what you had in mind Joel? Post back in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

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What is a form factor


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NEED SIZE WHAT CU. FT. OF REFRIGERATOR?


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Your specific system's drivers are available on this page.
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I would like to move it in to a bigger case


When looking at the specifications of the HP Compaq DC7700 SFF Desktop PC, all they state is the motherboard form factor is, 'Custom'.

Same thing for the DC7700 USDT Desktop PC.
Both of these desktop computers are of the 'Pizza Box' design.
(Flat rectangular box)

The DC7700 CMT model is a tower model, and the motherboard form factor for it is uATX.
uATX can also mean Micro-ATX.

The form factor of a Micro-ATX motherboard is 244mm by 244mm, or also said as 9.6 inches by 9.6 inches.
(9.6 inches is approximately 9 and 9/16ths inches)

To regress for a moment, and explain the term Form Factor.
This term is supposed to apply only to motherboards, but has gone on to apply to computer cases, and power supply's.

Form factor means the dimensions of the motherboard, and also where the I/O area is located.

[I/O = Input/Output
Area for the Input/Output devices that are attached to the computer.
Examples: Mouse, Keyboard and Monitor]

Whether the motherboard is installed onto the Left side of the computer case, and the I/O area is on the Left side also (ATX , Micro-ATX, and uATX form factor),
or
whether the motherboard is installed on the Right side of the computer case, and the I/O area is on the Right side also. (BTX)

Dimension sizes:
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Micro-ATX is 244mm x 244mm (9.6 inches by 9.6 inches)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_form_factor

Above the link is the Maximum size for the Micro-ATX form factor.
It can also be the Minimum size of 171.45mm x 171.45mm

(Or 6.75 inches by 6.75 inches.
6.75 inches = 6 and 3/4 inches)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MicroATX

Point of all this?
The motherboard form factor inside a DC7700 SFF is probably a uATX form factor, and is 6.75 inches by 6.75 inches.
Or some variation thereof.
It's a custom size.


This means good luck in finding a computer case you can buy off of the shelf, and is large enough to install an ATX power supply.

You can get a custom one made, and you're probably looking at $150 to $200.

Or, you can modify one of these computer cases VERY easily,

1) http://www.directron.com/cs888uvbl.html

The above is an Acyrlic plastic computer case. It's approximately 1/4 inch thick for the case walls, bottom, and top.

VERY sturdy.

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It should have holes in the case where a Micro-ATX motherboard can be mounted, by unscrewing the Standoffs, and screwing them into the Micro-ATX holes.

[A Standoff is a piece of metal that is hex shaped, and has a threaded hole in one end, and a threaded end on the other side ]

If there isn't the proper holes for mounting your motherboard, you make the holes.
The case is plastic.

Uses an ATX power supply.
The cost of the case is $50

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