Question about Video Cameras

1 Answer

I am having trouble Viewing my VHS-C tapes

I have many camcorder video tapes that are over a decade old. I seem to see only a little bit of the video and then the tape goes blank. I dismanteled one tape in hopes of seeing what is wrong and I found that at one part the tape was cut so I have a piece to splice together. However, I dont know how to reassemble this as there are many parts inside and some fell out since when opening the tape itself, it opened in the middle and not at a small back opening. Can someone tell me how to fix the unopened tapes as well as put the opened tape back together by splicing the cut out piece and assembling all the parts the way they should go before reclosing it. Too many memories can't be viewed and I would love to be able to see them and transfer them to a dvd burner which I have (actually it is a vhs/dvd unit that will transfer the info onto a dvd) Can someone give me detailed info and possibly a picture to show me about reassembly of the opened tape? Thank you, Karen

Posted by on


1 Answer

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points


    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.


    An expert who has answered 200 questions.


    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

  • Expert
  • 287 Answers

Karen. you really opened up a can of worms there. Here is what I would do. buy a blank vhs-c tape unscrew it from the bottom and use it to compare to your project tape. as far as spicing goes that can get tricky. I used to do it all the time with 8 tracks, showing my age here, but they are not as critical. the tape will have to go on the back side of the film and can not get to close to the top or bottem of the film. remember the video head can not touch the tape you apply. it's a little crazy but I guess if you have small fingers you can try it at your own risk. Good luck Karen. Larry

Posted on Sep 18, 2007


1 Suggested Answer

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

A 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
The service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017


Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add



Related Questions:

2 Answers

Camcorder VHS tape is tangled

Sometimes you can salvage a VHS tape by opening the cassette and manually winding or rewinding the tape to put the damaged section to one side and under tension to "iron out" the wrinkles. Your Fuji Hi8 tape may be quite thin so this repair may not work.

Dec 18, 2013 | Canon ES300V ES4000 ES410V and ES420V ES50...

1 Answer

Found many family TXK E-HG TC-20 tapes. What device do I need to see these?

The TC encoding usually stood for VHS-C type of tapes. These were created so that VHS type manufacturers could compete with the HI-8 type of camcorders that came out years ago. They were essentially regular VHS tapes that were shrunk down in size to allow them to build smaller camcorders.You could either play them back directly from the camera itself, or you could use the adapter that came with the camera that allowed you to play the tape back from a regular VHS VCR. The adapter was the size of a regular VHS tape, and it had a lid on the top that you would open and drop your VHS-C tape into it.

If you still have a VHS VCR you could watch the tapes using an adapter. If you do not have one you can search on the web for both the adapter and a VHS VCR if need be. Depending on the size of the city you live in there may be a conversion outfit that can take your VHS-C tapes and burn them onto DVD's for you. Prices varied quite a bit on that service so you should do a little shopping around if that is the way you want to go.

Jun 27, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

I have a number of VHS-C tapes from my various video cameras in the early-to-mid 1990s that I'm transferring to DVD via my DVD/VCR combo device. But several of of these tapes that have the suffix...

VHS-C and S VHS-C are two different animals. Super VHS-C will have much better video resolution than standard VHS and uses better videotape. A standard VCR will not play the Super format. You need a S VHS VCR. You would need not only a S VHS VCR but also a S VHS-C adapter. Yes, Not even the adapter is the same as a standard VHS-C adapter cassette.

You can send out your few S VHS-C tapes to a video conversion service. That might be the least expensive way to get them on DVD. Otherwise you could look on for either a compatible camcorder (S VHS-C) or the S VHS VCR and the S VHS-C adapter. is one video conversion service that should be able to get your tapes on DVD for you. You could also look locally for a video service that does conversions to DVD.

Feb 19, 2011 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

OUr Samsung SCL 810 Hi-8 Camcorder is flashing Lemg-Eject in yellow, but won't eject a tape. We know it is old, but we're trying to transfer all the tapes to other media so we won't lose them and now the...

I had a similar problem with a Cannon Optura PI and had to send it in. It was better, but I still have problems on occasion. If your intent is to transfer all the tapes to media, I would suggest purchasing Toshiba's DVD Video Recorder/Video Cassette Recorder. Model: DVR620KU. I use a VHS-C Cassette Adapter to play my VHS-C tapes in and the dubbed them to a DVD. Works great. Unfortunately, there is no 8mm/VHS Adapters, since 8mm, Hi8, miniDV are different formats with different technical characteristics than VHS. These formats were never developed with the intention to be mechanically compatible with past or current VHS technology. Your best bet would to borrow a HI-8 Camcorder and then dub your tapes to DVD's using the Toshiba machine. Here is a link to the Toshiba machine.
Good luck

Dec 28, 2010 | Samsung SC-L810 Camcorder

1 Answer

Camcorder won't record

Check the tape and make sure the record tab is still on the tape and has not been removed. If the record tab has been removed then use a new tape for recording as the unit will not record. This tap is usually on the lower left end of the back of the tape. When the tap is present it closes a record mode switch letting the system know the tape is able to bv recorded on..

Dec 27, 2009 | RCA CC6363 Camcorder

1 Answer

How do i go about transfering vhs-c video from an

You have several options. But important one to understand is the limitations of a PIII computer like Armada e500. You may not have enough grunt to convert stuff, even after buying the necessary video capture devices which work on USB.

Also I am assuming you either have the jvc camcorder still available or atleast have a VHS-C to VHS adapter to play the tapes on a standard VHS tape player.

Unless you are having a lot tapes and need editing while converting, your better bet might be to go to one of the shops that convert these tapes on to DVD or a suitable flash drive which might work out cheaper and quicker.

The last time I did this thing (quality of my VHS-C tapes was bad) I bought a Samsung combined VHS Video / DVD recorder and used the dubbing feature to burn DVDs. Cost me about $150 a year ago. I was able to do some editing on the way as I was connected to the TV screen as well. Saved me the hassles of dealling with the PC type video capture devices and software.

Dec 25, 2009 | JVC S-VHS Tapes (ST120SVDU2) S-VHS Tape

1 Answer

Playback *stops* on tapes where I used Aux input to record

It could be that.. you generally want a timebase corrector to properly record from analog tape to some other medium. But maybe not. Most tape-based devices also include a tension sensor, to detect the end-of-tape. If you're using tapes that are too old, cheap, etc. it could be that you're seeing this triggered.

I recommend trying the same VHS recording with a good quality, fresh tape. If it's still kicking off, you at least know it's due to the camcorder having issues with sync or something on the tape. If it works, blame the old tapes.

It's probably camcorder dependent, but I have done tape restorations using Digital8 and DV equipment, and have never known a camcorder to cut itself off due to dropouts or other problems on the tape -- mine just play through. So I think it's at least possible that it's just the tape.

Jan 20, 2008 | Sony Handycam DCR-TRV103 Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

Transferring camcorder tapes to VHS

It depends on what speed these tapes were first recorded on. Maybe the camcorder your trying to use to play them back do not support this tape speed I have seen this in the past. Are these 8-MM or VHS-C tapes.. Also the tapes that were recored, maybe tyhere was something wrong with the tape path and was slightly out of alighnment. I had once a Sony 8-MM camcorder and tapes a lot of stuff and then gave them to someone to watch and they would not play. I tryed the tapes again in my camcorder and they worked great. I got a test tape and tryed it in my camcorder and it turned out the tape path alighnment was off, so i had to rerecord everything I had from one camcorder to DVD so i could fix my camcorder. Good Luck

Mar 26, 2007 | Hitachi VME545 Camcorder

1 Answer

Adapter question

There are no such adapters that would allow 8mm, Hi8 and Mini DV tapes to be played in a VHS VCR. Only the old VHS-C tapes can fit and play in an adapter. There are several reasons why 8mm (or Hi8 and miniDV tapes) cannot be physically played in a VHS VCR: 1. 8mm (Hi8, miniDV) is a different format with different technical characteristics than VHS. These formats were never developed with the intention to be mechanically compatible with current VHS technology. 2. 8mm/Hi8 tapes are 8mm wide (miniDV is 6mm wide), while VHS tape is 1/2" wide, making it impossible for a VHS video head to read the taped information correctly. 3. 8mm/Hi8/miniDV tapes are recorded and played at different speeds than VHS, so even if the tapes could physically fit into a standard VHS VCR, the VCR still couldn't play back the tapes at their correct speeds. 4. 8mm/Hi8/minDV audio is recorded differently than VHS. 8mm/Hi8 audio is recorded in AFM HiFi mode, while miniDV audio is recording in 12-Bit or 16-Bit PCM digital audio format. So, even if the video could be played back in a VHS VCR, the audio could not be read properly. 5. 8mm/Hi8 video is of higher resolution than VHS and is recorded in a different bandwidth length (miniDV video is recorded digitally), so once again, a standard VCR still could not read the information correctly, even if the tape could fit into a VCR.

Sep 06, 2005 | Samsung DouCam VP-D5000i Mini DV Digital...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Video Cameras Logo

Related Topics:

228 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Video Cameras Experts


Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers


Level 3 Expert

77932 Answers

The Knight
The Knight

Level 3 Expert

74990 Answers

Are you a Video Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides