Question about Mamiya RB67 Pro SD Medium Format Camera

2 Answers

Fungus in the lens

I have a Mamiya 250mm lens, 127mm and 50mm lenses. All 3 have fungus/spores inside the elements. Can anyone tell me how to take these lenses apart and clean please? What should I use to clean them? Thanks.

Posted by on

  • David Shaub May 11, 2010

    We've been down this road before and after almost 200 responses, the asker still was not satisfied. Take it to a camera shop or send it to the manufacturer.

×

Ad

2 Answers

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 36 Answers

These lenses arn't designed to be taken apart.

A camera specialist may help but they should alwys be kept dry and at room temp never warm and humid. Silicate gel in your storage bag also prevents this from happening.

Good luck

Marc

Posted on Apr 17, 2009

Ad
  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 5 Answers

This is not a do-it-yourself job. Lenses are put together with exacting tolerances and you will screw up all kinds of things unless you are a trained technician. If the lens has fungus it just indicates it's got some age and well overdue for a repair shop servicing. Remember to un-**** a lens if you don't plan to use it for a while.

Posted on Nov 14, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Fungus in lens


como abrir una camara de video

Jan 18, 2013 | Sony SAL-1680Z 16-80mm f/3.5-4.5 Carl...

Tip

How to avoid fungus on Digital Camera Lens?


The dreaded fungus is something that bothers every photographer. I have suffered from it before, and every coming rain gives me constant worries of possibilities of fungus growing somewhere inside my lenses. I am more vulnerable to fungus than most people because I don't think much about taking out the camera to get some good shots even if it has been raining a bit, and have often got plenty of rain drops on the camera and the lens therefore.

Where does fungus comefrom?
  • Fungus spores are everywhere and germinate under suitable environmental conditions:
  • Relative humidity of at least 70% (more than 3 days)
  • No or little airflow
  • Darkness
  • Nutrients (textile lint, traces of grease, varnish, dust and dirt)
  • Temperatures between 10 and 35°C
How can fungus be avoided?
  1. Silica Gel. This seems to be the easiest and common way to avoid fungus, but I haven't had much success with it either.
  2. . Store the lenses in an airtight container. Again, you may need to put a few Silica Gels in the container. Putting too many of Silica Gel is known to dry out the lubricants in the lens, so you need to use your discretion with quantity of the Silica Gel.
  3. . A popular idea is to install a low wattage tungsten bulb in the closet where you keep the lens. This will keep the place warm and dry, preventing the fungus. This is known to work.
  4. . Store the lens in transparent container. Fungus is known to fear light and love darkness. Also make sure that the lenses are not stored in leather bags, as leather can easily attract fungus.
  5. And finally, of course, the best way to prevent fungus is to get out and shoot more often.
  6. After the work is done, immediately clean the instruments. If possible, you can use a fan or blower to facilitate evaporation of surface moisture.




on Feb 13, 2010 | Cameras

2 Answers

How to remove fungus inside inner Tamron's lens


My phone every time I want to dowload any thing from the web it doesn't support

May 06, 2012 | Cameras

1 Answer

Fog in the lense of my Vivitar 75-300mm macr focusing lense, can't seem to locat a place to have the lense cleaned. I live in Palestine Texas and have a limited budget.


The fog is most likely lens fungus and is very difficult to remove, so is also expensive to remove. It's not suited to a DIY repair without special tools and equipment. Spare parts for your lens are practically unobtainable, and camera and lens repairers are much rarer these days.

With all due respect, your lens is nearly worthless even if in perfect condition, so your lens is totally beyond economic repair.

You have the following options (in no particular order):-

1. Discard your lens and replace it. You can find replacements very cheaply online, although you may need to be a little flexible as to what's acceptable. Tamron Adaptall-2 lenses can be very good and you can switch the lens mounting to fit your Minolta MD. Lesser-regarded brands such as Sunagor were also in reality very good lenses and their 80-250mm has a very similar effective focal length to your Vivitar. Hoya were also a less-regarded brand despite actually making many of the lenses for "better" brands (including Vivitar, from time to time). You can also find replacement lenses for free either by asking around friends and relatives or by looking/asking on FreeCycle and Gumtree, although it is harder to find them for Minolta than say, Canon, Nikon or Pentax. On the flip side I have had many complete and perfectly functional 35mm SLR outfits from FreeCycle, so if the lens comes with a body attached who's complaining?

2. If the fogging does not affect your images then live with it. if it does reduce contrast, then consider scanning your negatives/transparencies and using free software to repair the images.

3. Leave your lens out in daylight with the lens cap removed. Some of the common types of lens fungus are destroyed by UV light. It won't physically remove the fungus, nor will it repair any damage to the optical elements inside your lens, but it can recover an otherwise unusable lens. If the fogging inside is due to moisture instead, then the fogging may dissipate if the lens is left in a warm and sunny location which is well ventilated. Marks may remain, but they'll rarely affect image quality.

Good luck.

Jul 16, 2011 | Vivitar 75-300mm f/4.5-5.6 Manual Focus...

1 Answer

What should i do?...my tamron 17-50 began to have a fungus.


Well, that's a great lens and most definitely worth the cleaning/service. I don't know where in the world you are but fungus growing inside a lens is only heard of in high humidity environments and can happen fairly quickly. Are you sure this is a fungus on the inside and not just a clouded smear on the front element? If the lens is having a problem then the camera won't be to far behind. To answer your question more directly "what should I do" my suggestion is to send the lens to a authorized Tamron service/repair center/depot for cleaning. After which get a few of those little moisture absorbing packets and place them in with your photo gear to help reduce the moisture.

Jan 19, 2011 | Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di-II LD [IF] SP...

1 Answer

There's fungus inside the rear element - how do I remove the glass to get at it?


Any way you want.
The problem with fungus is that it etches the glass, which then has to be replaced. Unless you can find a stockpile of Contax 50mm f/1.7 Planar T* lenses for a replacement part, you'll have to buy another lens.

Let alone the recalibrating after replacing the lens element.

Sorry about that.

Dec 03, 2009 | Contax Normal 50mm f/1.7 Carl Zeiss Planar...

1 Answer

Hi, I have a nikon lens that has fungos inside the lens, is there any way to clens it?


Hello. Sadly, the answer is no. You must have the lens repaired by a tech. If the fungus is on the front lens element, trying to remove the lens for cleaning will invite disaster in short order. There are hidden set-screws, grease, precise distances, and sometimes timing positions involved. If the fungus is severe enough, the actual glass element will have to be replaced because fungus can etch itself into the surface! The key to preventing fungus is to NOT store the camera/lenses in a cool, dark, place like a closet or drawer. If you do need to store the system for a longer period, remove all batteries, use a desiccant(the little packet that says DO NOT EAT) which absorbs moisture, and then close up everything in a sealed bag. This keeps any extra moisture from entering the sealed environment of the bag while the desiccant keeps the interior extremely dry.---Hope this helps!---Rick

Oct 02, 2009 | Cameras

1 Answer

Fungus inside lens


if it's mild then it won't have any appreciable effect on your photographs, so leave it until it's worse. The fungus can be slowed or killed by sunlight or by exposing the lens element to ultra violet light.

If it's really bad then you have to decide whether it's worth a professional strip down and clean. You'd have realistic two choices: to remove the fungus and replace all lubricants and canada balsam lens cement with modern antifungal equivalents but leave the damaged lens coatings as they are or to do the same and also have affected lens groups replaced with new ones or have the old ones re-coated. The first option is expensive, the second option is very expensive.

Jul 31, 2009 | Mamiya Macro 140mm f/4.5 L-A for RZ67

1 Answer

Hi, It appears there is a small amount of fungus inside my lens, and when taking a picture, it comes back very dark. What would a possible remedy be for this? Many thanks Jon


This is actually a very common situation for older lenses. You should take the lens to a trained technician and have them clean the inner elements of the lens. Often times they can, if the fungus isn't too bad. In extreme situations, they will need to replace the element itself.

Jul 05, 2009 | Sigma 24-70mm F3.5-5.6 AF Zoom Lens

1 Answer

I have a Minolta Rokkor-x 200mm telephoto lens with fungus


Lens fungus is really common and it's not cost effective to repair. Even if the fungus is removed then the multicoatings are permanently damaged.

The good news is that until the fungus becomes pretty severe the image quality doesn't suffer much as most photos use the lens stopped down to some extent and this means that if the centre of the lens is clear then there's nothing to block the light paths.

Unfortunately it does tend to spread, so keep affected lenses in a separate camera bag to the rest and if you can afford to do so then throw them away and replace your camera bag as it will be loaded with microscopic spores waiting to attack more lenses. Making sure that your camera and lenses are completely dry and free of condensation before storing them until next used will prevent reoccurence.

Jun 16, 2009 | Cameras

Not finding what you are looking for?
Mamiya RB67 Pro SD Medium Format Camera Logo

Related Topics:

446 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Mamiya Photography Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

102366 Answers

yadayada
yadayada

Level 3 Expert

76132 Answers

Tony

Level 3 Expert

2600 Answers

Are you a Mamiya Photography Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...