Question about Sony PlayStation 2 (PS2) Console

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While i was playing i taped my controller wire because the analog light was off then the controller works fine then its busted but when i plug it in and pressed the analog botton the red light is still turning on what should i do?

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Most likely when you taped the wires together, the one that operates the analog sticks is not connected properly or is broken somewhere else in the cord. The only thing you can really do for that is to go buy a replacement or take it and have it re-wired.

Posted on Apr 16, 2009

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How too hook up a audio source eq100 to my harman/kardon avr 1600. i have in the tape outs and ins on both devices but its not working PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



http://www.retrevo.com/support/Harman-Kardon-AVR-1600-Receivers-manual/id/23554ag018/t/2/


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:



You have to select any available 'tape loop' containing an overrideable analog 2-channel Out and In. That would be Video 1 or Tape on the HK.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.


The EQ has its own Tape Loop(s) to replace the one it uses. Actual Tape Decks or Processors can nest into those loops and be engaged or bypassed via controls on the EQ or Processor.



Mar 10, 2011 | AudioSource EQ-100 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Looking to hook up an audiosource EQ100 to an a sony cass deck


Simply place it in line with the analog input. Or install it in a Tape Loop on your integrated amp/receiver and attach your tape deck to ITS tape Loop.

Ins to Outs


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.

Be advised, using analog processors on digital-capable multichannel elcetronics will only work for analog 2-channel sources.

Mar 05, 2011 | AudioSource EQ-100 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

Hello, Can somebody please tell me how I can hook up my Yamaha EQ70 to my Yamaha RX-V663? Thanks very much!


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.



Okay, back to the hook-up:


You have to select any available 'tape loop' containing an overrideable analog 2-channel Out and In.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.



So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

Mar 05, 2011 | Yamaha EQ-70 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

How to connect my eq to my harman kardon recevier model avr-247


The following is some boilerplate I made up that should explain some usage limitations.


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.


Okay, back to the hook-up:


Any of the following audio connections on the HK will work: Tape, Vid1 or Vid 2.


Receiver Tape Out (Rec) - to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Rec, Line-In;


Receiver Tape In (Play) - from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Play , Line-Out.


So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer

Feb 04, 2011 | Harman Kardon Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Audio Problems playing VHS tapes with Denon AVR 1910


Did it EVER work as expected with VCR audio through the HDMI or are we working through that right now assuming it can?

I don't have a detailed manual, but the rear panel clearly shows some analog-only outputs (and NO digital ones) for the section called DVD/VCR. Internally, I'm sure there are proper analog-digital-converters for recording VHS to the native DVD-R, but VHS VCR's are NOT inherently digital audio devices so I'm pretty sure you need to run an analog RCA pair for the VHS video.

Feb 22, 2010 | Denon AVR588 Receiver

1 Answer

Right analog stick not working


Check the controls on the game's control section. If you play another game that uses the right analog control and it works on that game then it's the control set up for FIFA. Make sure that the analog control light is on when the game boots up. Sometimes if the analog control light is not on when you turn the game on and you turn it on afterwards, the analog stick controls don't work properly. That happened to me on NFS Pro Street. If this helped you leave feedback please. FIXYA!

Feb 19, 2009 | Sony PS2 Dual Shock 2 Controller...

3 Answers

Xbox 360 Wired Controller Busted


Yeah I foudn the problem. I just found out one of the wires was broken inside, right above where the controler meets the wire. It was a grayish wire, probably the one that turns it on. No wonder it would only turn on if the wire was in a certain position, it was connecting the wires! Problem solved.

Aug 17, 2008 | Microsoft Xbox 360 Controller

1 Answer

Equalizer for Bose 901 Series IV


There's good news and bad news. The bad news is that a multichannel receiver with Bose 901's attached as you have them will only sound right in STEREO on stereo analog material. For one thing, the other speakers around the room are not designed to receive its Active Equalization and for another, if you engage your Tape Monitor you will NOT BE ABLE TO HEAR DIGITAL sources. Tape Monitor is for analog stereo material only and on my receiver it disables any digital inputs so you really can't use the Tape Monitor circuit or attached devises for modern digital sources. However, you can still employ the various DSP options to spread 2-channel analog source material around the room. I do.

The good news. I have a setup similar to what I think you're trying to do and it works great! With one caveat - My receiver actually has 5.1 analog Outputs so I can drive up to 6 external amplifiers if I want to (I drive 4). Yours does NOT so we have to be creative in extracting the front two channels from your multi-channel receiver. The obvious place would be at one of the few OUTputs on the back, assuming you have one free to use.

I see Video 1 and MD/Tape have Audio Outputs. Use one of these to feed the Bose EQ. **

A separate stereo amp for the 901's was my solution. I run a Carver AV-406 (5-channel amp) for my 901's in Front, 2 Subwoofers and the Rear Surround channel, with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Outputs and the 901's amp channels. My receiver controls everything and just drives the Center and Surround speakers.

You could get by with just a stereo amp for the 901's. A Carver M-200 is a good efficient amplifier that would have you cooking just fine (2x100W). Run it with the Active EQ between the receiver Front L&R Pre-Outputs ** and the 901's amp channels.

** Sony STR-DE595 (Video 1 or MD/Tape Audio Out ***) >>> Bose EQ Amplifer IN, then
Bose EQ Amplier OUT >>> new amplifier IN.


Attach the 901's to the new amp, set its volume to Max and run through your receivers speaker level setup.

*** In either case you will NOT be able to SELECT the source you use for the 901 Pre-Outs for listening, or else the 901's will not get any sound sent their way. This is what's happening to you right now when you select MD/Tape. You're disconnecting the source from the 901 EQ.

You may have to get ugly with your other input components to find them all homes on the receiver. The labeling won't necessarily match up with the device types. Mine is ugly like that and I have a lot of connectors, but I have even more input devices.

If you have CD, TV Cable box and DVD (typical) you need to assess what you have that is digital and use what you can wherever you can, then the leftover analog device(s) - PC? - can go into any available analog input that is left over.

Whichever of these connections you DO NOT use for the 901's will still be available for using some kind of conventional analog recording device or sound processor such as an EQ or dbx Expander. However, as with any digital receiver, selection of that device for monitoring will kill the sound from any DIGITAL source you have playing (or maybe it just won't allow you to monitor).

Jan 17, 2008 | Sony STR-DE595 Receiver

2 Answers

Picture and sound is skipping or stuttering during playback. It happens when playing any video.


This was often caused by mixing brands of tape. Do not use head cleaners more than absolutely necessary. More than half a dozen times or so, and heads are toast.

Use quality tapes of the same make/length, from new, and you will be fine. (the coatings on the tapes vary, and can/did interact with each other.)

Nov 02, 2007 | Sony Handycam DCR-TRV310 Digital Camcorder

3 Answers

Pass Thru, Analog Signal Converter How-To


I wonder if this is a MacroVision problem. Try this; take a VCR tape that you have recorded from the tv, try to record a commercial and then play this tape through your setup, I bet you it works. (Now take what I say next in the sense that it is given and that is as advice)When you are trying to push signal that you get from an analog source from the VCR by law that signal has to be encoded with macrovision to ensure that the signal can not be copied. Now the funny thing is you can transfer tapes which have not been encoded this is normal, what you need is a piece of equipment that removes Macrovision, here is a link that might help: http://www.regioncodefreedvd.com/copyeliminator.html also look up the company SIMA

Sep 07, 2007 | Sony GV-D200 Digital 8 TM VCR

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