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Hot dehumidifier why does it give off so much heat and what can i do to not make my basement a sauna

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My GE basement dehumidifier is overheating. The bucket still collects water and the fan works, but the unit is putting out alot of heat. My dad is visiting and has taken the whole thing apart. Any...

Yes, the first suggestion is I hope your dad can get it back together without any parts left over (LOL). Over heating is generally caused by an clogged or dirty air intake filter. Simply removing it and vacuuming it or if it's really dirty, washing it in warm water and mild dish washing liquid will clean it. Rinse it thoroughly, shake off excess water and allow to dry completely. Never operate the unit without the filter in place. Doing so, can damage the unit.

Getting back to the heat for a moment and where you're using your dehumidifier. Dehumidifiers do generate heat, it's not abnormal. Operating it in a basement can cause it to over heat. This happens because the air temperature at floor level is colder than at shoulder level. Dehumidifiers struggle in temperatures below 65 degrees F (unless you have a Low temp unit, designed for basement applications). Raising the unit up off the floor, on to a sturdy table, counter top, etc, that an handle the weight of the unit, plus a full bucket of water, will generally resolve the problem.
Actually, a basement application , higher is better.

I hope this helped you and thanks for choosing FixYa.

Aug 16, 2011 | GE AHG40LJ Dehumidifier

2 Answers

The dehumidifier is getting cold condensation on the top outside of the unit and no water in the bucket. Model BGD-510A. I cleaned the filter and the coils and still have this problem.

Kathryn, if you are operating it in a basement application, the problem is that air temperature at floor level, is colder than at shoulder level. Dehumidifiers struggle to work at temperatures between 40 & 65 degrees F (Unless they are Low Temp model designed for basement applications). And will ice up at times. Raising the unit up off the floor onto a sturdy table, counter top, etc that can handle the weight of the unit, plus a full bucket of water, will usually resolve the problem.

If it's not a basement application, try lowering the humidity extraction level to 35%. In you have an analog unit, turn the control knob to Maximum.

I hope this helps you and thanks for choosing FixYa.

Aug 10, 2011 | Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

Our new dehumidifier (65 pint LG) is heating up our entire basement. Is this normal that it gives off so much heat?

Yes... it turns the electricity used into heat...which heats the room...


Jun 14, 2011 | LG Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

We bought a ADEH 50 LNL1 Serial 106143 this summer. It does a great job at removing water from our basement,needing emptied every 24-36 hrs. However it is always so hot in whatever room we set it that...

Unfortunately see a dehumidifier puts the heat back into the room... it does not remove any heat...but... the heat from the fan motor and the compressor is added to the room... thus the heating that you are noticing...

Sorry I cannot give better news... :-(


Aug 29, 2010 | GE Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

Kenmore dehumidifier M/N 580.53650200 only runs for about 1 minute, then stops. Dehumidifying level is set to minimum (40) and it's damp in the basement so I know the air is not too dry. The fan works, the...

Well to knowledge the problem 40 percent is dry. means your basement is great. humidity should be 30/50 percent 50 grows mold. also if it runs for a min the auot shut off is activating. check this first.


Oct 06, 2009 | Kenmore 5365 Dehumidifier

2 Answers

Kenmore 54501 turns on but nothing happens in my damp basement

A dehumidifier heats and cools the air to remove moisture. Most are like a small air cond. The Condenser coil is right in front of the evap.coil. So the compressor may not be coming on. Does it sound the same as before? It may be low on freon. You will have to get in there and listen and feel the lines at or near the compressor, Learn how to get down in there to the compressor. Run it for 10 Mins. unplug it, open it up, and feel the lines. Some lines should be or can be HOT to the touch. Some should be cool. The smaller the line the hotter it should be, and the compressor should be warm (to hot) to the touch. repost for more info.

Jul 08, 2009 | Kenmore 54501 Dehumidifier

1 Answer

My Danby DDR586R dehumidifier shouts hot air, it was shooting cool air before, what can the problem be?

Here is Danby's official response to a similar question on their FAQ page for Dehumidifiers:

Q) When the dehumidifier is operating, is it normal for the expelled air to be quite warm? We find that the dehumidifier is warming up the room noticeably (a finished basement).

A) The warm air that is being expelled from your dehumidifier is normal. When the unit is dehumidifying the compressor is working which causes the compressor to become quite hot. In order to avoid having the compressor overheat, air is drawn by the compressor at a rapid rate and the heat is then transferred to the air which must be expelled from the unit. The warm air will stop shortly after the unit has reached the desired humidity. This warm air should not change your room temperature by more than a degree or two.

May 07, 2009 | Dehumidifiers

1 Answer

Works well but

Yup, they eat energy.

An electric dehumidifier includes a refrigeration cycle that is very similar to a window AC units and refrigerators. They cool the air in the basement to condense and collect water and remove humidity, heat the air as a required consequence of the refrigeration cycle and dump it back to your basement.

Two sources of humidity in basements include warm outside air that naturally cools due to below grade earth contact and water passing from the ground though the floors and walls and evaporating into the basement. Dehumidifiers do most of the work in the summer when higher temperatures outside enable air to hold more water content.

In the winter, cooler outside air contains less moisture by weight eventhough it may be raining and the relative humidity in basement will be less because the air is warmed relative to the outside. The lower moisture content in the winter also absorbs the water passing through the walls and floor.

From an energy perspective, you may want the humidity set NOT below 50%. This will keep humidity below the level mold desires, but prevents the dehumidifier from doing more work and eating more energy than needed. A cheap battery powered temp/humidy meter left in your basement will help. Sources that include the "mold triangle" (temperature, water & food) often separate fact from expensive hype.

If the dehumidifier doesn't keep up, consider adding a moisture barrier to the basement walls and floors such as Dry-lock and floor paints to ****** moisture entry. Moisture barriers act very similar with water as insulation does with heat. They don't eliminate the need for a dehumidifier, but they reduce the work they do and energy they eat.

Oct 02, 2008 | DeLonghi DH40P Dehumidifier

1 Answer

Heats up basement

Dehumidifiers and how they work
Heat pump dehumidifiers

Dehumidifiers use a heat pump (similar to an air conditioner's heat pump) or chemical adsorbents to remove moisture from the air without cooling the air.

A heat pump dehumidifier uses a fan to draw indoor air over a heat exchange coil. The coil is almost freezing. The water in the air condenses on the coil and is drained. A second heat exchange coil reheats the air, which the dehumidifier exhausts into the room.

A heat pump dehumidifier dumps heat lost from the compressor and fan motors into the air. It returns to the indoor air the heat generated by the dehumidifier turning water vapour to liquid. I got this off the internet

Jun 24, 2008 | Maytag M7DH45B2A Dehumidifier

1 Answer


The Efficiency Factor (EF) is a guide to a dehumidifier's operating cost. The EF is the amount of water, in litres, a dehumidifier removes at 27°C (80.6°F) and 60 per cent relative humidity for each kilowatt hour (kWh) of electricity. If electricity costs 8 cents a kilowatt hour, which it does in many parts of Canada, a unit with an EF of 1.2 will remove 15 L (32 U.S. pints or 3.3 imperial gal.) foreach dollar in electricity costs. An advanced unit with an EF of 2.4 will remove 30 L (63 U.S. pints, 6 1/2 imperial gal.) of water for each electrical dollar spent. Because condensation gives off heat a dehumidifier acts as a heat source. This can be useful in spring or fall, when basements tend to be cool. In mid-summer, the heat added by a dehumidifier is counterproductive.

Sep 07, 2007 | Danby DDR583R Dehumidifier

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