Question about Trident Ear Drops for Scuba Diving, Swimming, Snorkeling, and all Watersports Swim

2 Answers

Ear drops for scuba diving so my ears don't hurt while under water

Posted by on

Ad

2 Answers

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    Corporal:

    An expert that has over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

    Problem Solver:

    An expert who has answered 5 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 18 Answers

There are a few masks available on the market at the moment that are designed to help ease this problem Pro ear mask is just one of them but if if you continue to have ear pain then you wil need a medical report and mayeb have to consider not diving im afraid. Hope this helps and the mask works for you :)

Posted on Jul 27, 2009

Ad
  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

    Sniper:

    An expert who has posted more than 50 answers, of which 90% or more were rated as helpful.

  • Expert
  • 75 Answers

These ear drops and other similiar drops, are to be used AFTER you leave the water only! DO NOT put ANYTHING in your ears before or during your dive. This product and others like it contain an alcohol base which tends to purge and helps evaporate water which may have entered the ear canal. Your eardrums must be able to compensate for the difference in the atmospheric pressure at depth. Putting anything in your ears before or while at depth can interfere with this process and could cause serious damage to your inner ear.

This product is great for using AFTER the dive or just swimming. :)

Posted on Apr 22, 2009

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi,
a 6ya expert can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two.
best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.
the service is completely free and covers almost anything you can think of (from cars to computers, handyman, and even drones).
click here to download the app (for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need.
goodluck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Im swimming every day ,what can I put into my ears to stop wax build up


!st of all if you are swimming everyday then you shouldn't have wax buildup. That's one of the problems with swimming a lot, the water and chlorine get into your ears and remove all the oils, that's why swimmers get (swimmers Ears). Now if you've just started swimming and water is getting trapped in your ears then you can go to the store and buy some Debrox ear wax remover ora lot of people just take regular old peroxide and put 2 or 3 drops in their ears and let it go to work. 2 or 3 drops every day and in a week or so your ears should be cleared out. The just a drop every couple of days to maintain it.

Oct 28, 2013 | Tyealg39 Ears Giraffe Ears Green Ball...

Tip

Taking Care of your Kid's Ears


Ears aren't very high maintenence but there some things you should know about ear care that will help ensure healthy, happy ears.

What's the story with earwax?
Do you need to clean it out or should you leave it alone? Alot of kids don't realize that earwax is really helpful as it is there to protect the ear.
In general ear wax doesn't need removing as it makes it's own way to the entrance of the ear and comes out by itself.
although ear buds are really popular, they are actually damaging to the ear as it pushes the wax deeper in and can damdage the ear drum.
So don't stick anything small in your kids' ears to clean out the wax. Let it just do it's own thing and come out when it's ready.
Is swimming a problem for ears?
Water and ears are generally ok but there is a condition called swimmer's ear. It's basically an infection in the outer ear that is caused by swimming water getting stuck in the ear canal.
Usually ear drops will help sort it out quickly. If you have a problem with persistant ear infections you can buy special ear plugs that help keep the water out while you're swimming.
Pierced Ears - Is there anything special that I need to do for them?
When you get your ears pierced you need to follow the instructions from the salon and not remove the earings for up to 6 weeks, otherwise the hole might close up.
Pierced ears can easily get infected, so use an alchohol rub if you start to see any redness or sores.
If it gets very badly infected you may need an anti biotic cream but don't panic, it's very common and should clear up quickly.
Be Well.

on Feb 03, 2014 | Health & Beauty

1 Answer

What is swimmers ear?


Swimmers ear is an infection of the outer ear that can cause swelling and pain. It's caused by water get stuck in the ear and even though swimming isn't the only cause of that, it's the most common one.

If you think you have swimmer's ear you should see a doctor as you may need drops to clear it up. A good tip is to shake your ears out after swimming and showers.

Feb 20, 2013 | Health & Beauty

1 Answer

I have never used a dive compass before. Is there a manual as I bought it on ebay?


There is no manuals for scuba compass, I dont know what scuba school you hold your open water cert with but all scuba organisations such as PADI, SSI etc etc will cover navigation as part of there basic and advanced scuba education.

Sep 22, 2010 | Oceanic Clip Mount Maxtilt Compass -...

1 Answer

How and why scuba gauges give a diver critical information while scuba diving?


Scuba gauges give a diver three very important pieces of information: 1. Time 2. Depth 3. Air Consumption This information enables a diver to stay within safe time and depth limits and avoid running out of air. There are many different devices on the market to help with this, from simple gauges to complex digital consoles. Time If a diver is not using a dive computer to monitor their nitrogen, they dive according to approved dive tables. To use dive tables properly, a diver needs to track their downtime. This can be done with a good dive watch. Two things make a good dive watch: water resistance and a rotating bezel. 1. Water Resistance. Good dive watches are rated to a depth in meters or feet (e.g. 200 feet) or a pressure rating in atmospheres (e.g. 4atm). Even though most divers probably won’t dive below 130 feet (the recreational dive limit), a good dive watch should be rated to 200 feet. Note: There is a difference between “water resistance” and “waterproof”. A “waterproof” watch is what you would wear in the shower, but would probably start leaking at 15-20 feet. 2. Rotating Bezel. A bezel is an adjustable ring on the face of the dive watch with a pointer indicator. At the beginning of a dive, the pointer on the bezel is aligned with the minute hand where it stays though out the dive. At the end of the dive, you compare the difference between the bezel and the minute hand to find out the length of the dive. The bezel should only move “counterclockwise”. It is possible to accidently move the bezel during a dive. Because of this, watchmakers make sure any accidental movement will turn the time in a conservative direction, making the dive longer rather than shorter. Depth Another important part of scuba gauges is a depth gauge. A depth gauge enables a diver to keep track of their depth even if they cannot see the water’s surface. Gauges can be either an analog (needle-and-dial) device or a digital device. Both work in the same way. They measure the surrounding water pressure and convert this into an accurate reading of your depth. Another feature of a good depth gauge is a maximum depth indicator. This tells a diver their maximum during a dive and must be reset after each dive. Air Consumption Another equally important part of scuba gauges is a submersible pressure gauge (SPG). This is connected to the first stage with a high-pressure hose and measures the pressure of the air in the tank. The SPG is much like the gas gauge on a car. At the beginning of a dive, a diver starts with a full tank. This should be about 3000 psi or 200 bars. As the diver breathes during the dive, the gauge will move slowly downwards. This allows the diver to have enough air left in the tank to: 1. Make a slow, safe ascent 2. Make any necessary decompression stops 3. Inflate their BCD once at the surface 4. Breath from the regulator if the surface conditions are rough A submersible pressure gauge also allows a diver to stop diving with air still in the tank. This keeps contaminants from entering the tank due to no air pressure. Wrist Depth Gauge Scuba gauges come in two basic styles. Stand alone gauges or gauge consoles. Stand alone gauges such as a wrist mounted depth gauge or a submersible pressure gauge attached to the first stage of a regulator are great backups when using digital gauges. Gauge consoles allow divers to have all their gauges in one place. Although less easy to read, analog gauges sometimes give slightly more accurate readings than digital gauges, particularly at shallow depth. Submersible Pressure Gauge Choosing Scuba Gauges When choosing scuba gauges, remember to look for: 1. Easy-to-read numbers 2. Luminescent dial or back lighting options 3. Rotating/swivel mounting 4. Easy disassembly for cleaning or replacing parts 5. Good warranty

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

2 Answers

Prescription Scuba Mask


The inserts would be specifically for your eye prescription and are bonded to the lens. You can even get bifocals done for your mask and also correct for astigmatism. Your specific prescription can be fit into any dive mask that you choose so there is no need to buy a new mask. prescription scuba mask Manufacturers also offer scuba masks with lenses already premade and the same prescription in both eyes. You choose the prescription that fits your needs. Some divers find this adequate to use underwater. The premade prescription mask would obviously be cheaper than custom made scuba diving masks. Personally, I wear contact lenses when I dive and have had no problems (besides losing one after I surfaced and got hit by a wave). I wear the daily soft lenses and don't notice them when I dive. I've never dove with hard contact lenses so I do not know how they would respond to pressure. If you wear lenses, you should consult your eye doctor to see what they recommend in your case before you dive with lenses for the first time. Let them decide whether you would be better off with a prescription scuba mask or diving with contacts. One site I found which seems very professional is www.prescriptiondivemasks.com. They even have a testimonial from Cathy Church, the renowned underwater photographer, on their site so it can't be too shabby.

Dec 01, 2008 | Vision Mares Pure Mask

2 Answers

How to choose a scuba mask


"The shape of the scuba mask and the silicone skirt on the mask must conform to the shape of your face to provide you with a comfortable fit. Ensuring the silicone skirt is a high-grade, flexible silicone can help to ensure the scuba mask conforms to the shape of your face and the long life of your scuba mask. Some people are allergic to different types of rubber, if you have an allergy to rubber, be sure to choose a silicone scuba mask because silicone is hypoallergenic. Always talk to your scuba diving gear retailer about the alternatives available to you. When trying on scuba masks you will notice the different shapes of the nose pockets. The nose pocket protects and cushions your nose, helps to keep your scuba mask from fogging during a dive and helps you to maintain equalization. Ensure the size and shape of your nose pocket is comfortable; not too tight and not too large. This will improve not only the comfort of your scuba mask, but your ability to purge your mask efficiently. There are increasingly different styles of scuba mask straps on the market. You may like the factory issue strap on your scuba mask or you may want to purchase a separate strap. Scuba mask straps are available in a single strap or a double strap design. The single strap should wrap around the centre of the back of your head. The benefit of the double strap is that you can position the top strap on the upper part of your head and the bottom strap on the lower part of your head to offer extra stability and comfort. Most scuba mask straps are rubber or silicone and fasten with a post-hole belt enclosure. Newer scuba masks offer a slide-lock type enclosure, which allows you to adjust the scuba mask quickly and easily when wearing the mask. Scuba masks are constantly improving. If you wear prescription glasses or contact lenses on a daily basis you can purchase a scuba mask without having to wear your glasses or contact lenses under your mask. Many manufacturers will create custom scuba masks which include your prescription in the front lens. A good sign you have chosen the right scuba mask for your face is when the mask stays on your face comfortably without using the straps to hold it in place. You should try this simple test with each scuba mask you try on for the first time: See our choices for scuba masks 1. Place the scuba mask over your eyes and mouth ensuring the mask is in the correct position. 2. Take a quick, light breath in through your nose and immediately start to breathe through your mouth as if you are scuba diving. This will create a slight suction between the scuba mask and your face. The scuba mask should stay on your face. If you must push the scuba mask against your face, or inhale repeatedly to help the mask stay on your face, the mask is not a good fit. 3. Keep the scuba mask on your face for approximately one minute. This will help you to determine how tight the seal is and how comfortable the mask is on your face. 4. Exhale gently through your nose to release the seal on your scuba mask and remove the mask from your face. There should be no mark on your face from the scuba mask. If there is a red line around your face from the seal of the mask, the seal was too tight or the mask is not the proper size for your face. Try the test a second time. If you still have a red mark on your face after you remove the mask, you need to continue your search for a scuba mask. Remember, a good scuba mask is one that's comfortable, doesn't leak and is easy to use."

Dec 01, 2008 | Vision Mares Pure Mask

2 Answers

Scuba suit need?


"Wet suits and dry suits are very important when it comes to scuba diving. Your normal body temperature hovers around 98.6F (37C). If you are scuba diving in water that is cooler than your body temperature your temperature will drop. In all water, even the warmest, tropical waters, you will need thermal protection, like a wet suit, dry suit or dive skin, to keep warm and to keep safe while scuba diving. The cold affects our ability to think and our physical response time slows, which can lead to an accident. Warm tropical water will begin to feel cold after prolonged scuba diving, so it is always a good idea to wear light insulation at a minimum. When choosing thermal protection, like a wet suit or dry suit, you need to consider the following factors: Water temperature Your activity level during a dive Your body size You should always wear more insulation in colder water and lighter insulation in warmer water. Your level of activity can be a good indicator of how much insulation you should wear during a scuba dive. The more active you are during a dive the more heat your body generates and the warmer you remain throughout your dive. Larger scuba divers may need less insulation than smaller scuba divers and small, muscular scuba divers may need less insulation than larger scuba divers. It is important for you to try different amounts of insulation in differing water temperatures to determine what you need. Some scuba divers need more insulation than others, regardless of activity or size. Some scuba divers can dive in tropical water wearing only a lycra body suit, commonly known as a dive skin, while others need a 2mm wet suit. Some scuba divers can dive in cold water wearing only a 6mm wet suit, while others need the protection of a dry suit. If you are scuba diving in water below 55F (12.7C), a dry suit is the warmest type of thermal insulation available. Dive skins, wet suits and dry suits also protect your skin from cuts, scrapes, abrasions and stings which can occur while you are scuba diving. A simple brush against specific forms of coral and fish can cause painful irritations and burns on bare skin, but may not be noticeable or even occur, if your skin is protected."

Dec 01, 2008 | ACCO Brands Apollo Bio-Filter Moisture...

1 Answer

Scuba mask maintenance


" 1. Use a defogging solution before every dive, even when diving more than once in the same day. This will prevent your scuba mask from fogging during a dive. You can purchase a commercially prepared defogging solution from any reputable scuba diving retailer. Squeeze a drop or two onto the inside lens of your mask and gently rub the solution around to cover the inside completely. Dip your mask briefly into water, swirl the water around the inside of your mask very quickly and empty the water from your mask. A quick rinse will remove any excess defogging solution from the inside of your mask. You do not want to get defogging solution in your eyes, especially while diving, since it can cause stinging and irritation. If you don't want to use a commercially prepared defogging solution you have a defogging solution readily available and it's free, your saliva. Your saliva will prevent your scuba mask from fogging just as well as any commercial defogging solution. The enzymes in your saliva stick to the lens of your mask like a commercial defogging solution and you will never find yourself without a defogger while on a dive. 2. Never lay your scuba mask face-down on any surface. Salt, sand and grit will scratch the lens of your mask. Always place your mask face up when you are not wearing it or if it is not in its hard case. 3. Rinse your scuba mask in clean, freshwater after each dive and dry it thoroughly before storing it in its hard case. After a dive, your mask will be covered in a salty residue and/or dirt. This must be rinsed clean to prevent the silicone on your mask from degrading. Your mask must be completely dry before storing it to ensure the silicone stays clean and odor-free. 4. Always store your scuba mask in its hard case. If your mask did not come with a hard case purchase an after-market hard case. This will protect your mask from dirt and abrasives and protect it while traveling. Always store the case out of direct sunlight. Direct sunlight will break down the silicone after years of exposure. 5. Periodically repeat the toothpaste treatment to keep the lens of your scuba mask clean. A good rinse after each dive helps to keep your mask clean, but to ensure there is no residue or grit left on your scuba mask you must properly clean it on a regular basis."

Dec 01, 2008 | Vision Mares Pure Mask

3 Answers

How deep can I dive with this watch


Per "Sector" all of their watches are "water resistant to a minimum of 300 feet". Note that they do not say "water proof".

Aug 20, 2007 | Sector 450 2653450035 Wrist Watch

Not finding what you are looking for?
Trident Ear Drops for Scuba Diving, Swimming, Snorkeling, and all Watersports Swim Logo

Related Topics:

557 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Trident Boating Experts

Steve
Steve

Level 3 Expert

693 Answers

ray gallant

Level 3 Expert

44260 Answers

Bill Boyd

Level 3 Expert

42594 Answers

Are you a Trident Boating Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...