Question about Bushnell Voyager 78-9565 (120 x 60mm) Telescope

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Focus with erector eyepiece on

Trying to view a land object have put on the erector eyepiece but don't get an infocus image.

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Re: focus with erector eyepiece on

Some eyepieces cannot come to focus in certain telescopes-- try a different eyepiece.

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

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Which image erector eyepiece?

Most small 'consumer grade' or 'department store' telescopes use 0.9 inch diameter eyepieces. Better quality ones use 1.25 or 2.0 inch. Any image erector which will fit in the appropriate size focuser will probably be fine. Just select the image erector based on the eyepiece barrel diameter (0.9", 1.25" or 2.0").

Apr 05, 2014 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-7880 (190 x 78.74mm)...

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I bought a Prinz Astral telescope Model 100 at a boot sale. I don' t seem to be able to adjust the focus. Can you help ?

Never heard of this telescope. However take it outside during the day time and practice focusing on a distant object. Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one. Turn the focus knob left and or right until you get a sharp image in the eyepiece.

Apr 25, 2011 | Telescopes

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We are trying to test out viewing land based objects using the 30X eyepiece, which according to the instructions, should appear right side up and not upside down! This is not happening.

It's NOT really a problem. ALL reflector style telescopes show upside down images. This will not affect your star gazing since there is no UP OR DOWN in outer space. Read my tips on my profile page.

You can buy an "erecting diagonal" for terrestrial viewing- BUT this is not what an astronomical telescope is actually used for.

So align the small finder scope on a distant object like the top of a telescope pole during the day time. Point the main tube at the pole and get the tip top in the main tube's eyepiece. Without moving the telescope adjust the crosshairs on the finder scope on the exact same spot. The moon should be your first target at night and you can check and refine the finder scope on the moon.

Mar 12, 2011 | Bushnell 3" Reflector Telescope 60% OFF w/...

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I have a Barska telescope. Model: 60800. Diam: 60mm Focal length: 800 mm. I think I put it together correctly, but I can not see anything through it... just black. Yes, I have taken the cap off the...

The power of the scope will be the focal length of the main objective (yours is 800mm) divided by the focal length of the eyepiece, so a 9mm eyepiece will give a higher magnification (and be dimmer and harder to focus and find objects) than a 20mm eyepiece. It is usual to have two or three different focal length eyepieces for viewing different objects.

Starting out, you want to use the lowest power, so the highest number, eyepiece. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope. Try it out during the day (but never point a telescope anywhere near the Sun). This will make it easier to find the focus point. There is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount.

It is unlikely that the finder scope will be much use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Most manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match. Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scopes image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

Remember that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one.

Dec 31, 2010 | Telescopes

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I culmated my telescope and cant' get it to focus in. Using the focuser the image stays one big blob without any distinguishing figures.

Did you put an EYEPIECE into the focuser? Probably NOT.

Take the scope out in the day time, put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. Practice focusing on a distant object. TURN the focuser knob slowly until the object comes into sharp focus.

Sep 15, 2010 | Orion SkyQuest XT6 Classic Dobsonian (354...

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Can not see an image when viewing through lens

You mean EYEPIECE --- a reflector style telescope has no lenses-

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser. The MIRROR is on the bottom of the telescope-

The focuser end is pointed up just like the picture on your question.

Go outside during the say time and practice focusing on a distant object. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Dec 25, 2009 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Celestron astromaster 114 EQ (problems zooming in)

Most telescopes do not have a zoom-- they have different numbered eyepieces that give different magnification-- you can buy a zoom eyepiece however.

From what you describe -- put the eyepiece with the LARGEST number written on it into the telescope-- this is the LOWEST magnification. Now focus on the moon and or a distant land object during the day-- once it's in focus -- nice and sharp-- replace the eyepiece with the next LOWER number-- for more magnification. AND-- refocus the telescope for that eyepiece.

Feb 11, 2009 | Celestron AstroMaster 114 AZ (50 x 114mm)...

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No image

Turn the scope backwards and point the tail towards the daylight sky. My guess is you will see light. If you see a fish eye like view of the world then point the scope at a distant scene and wait until night. Sometime trying to use too much magnifation makes it hard to find and focus on night time objects.

If the fish eyeview looks twisted then my guess would be a lens element has become un mounted. Most likely it will be in the eyepiece but if this is a spotting scope it could be in the image erector lens bundle. I had a Vvitar that dropped a bundle in the zoom eyepiece when the zoom was twisted too far. The little screw that held the bundle in aligment was sheared off and had to be replaced. Obtain the small screws from a camera store.


Jul 27, 2008 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

1 Answer

What lens do i insert into scope to view the moon

The moon is big so use the 25mm. The Barlow will have a multiplication marking on it 2x 3x etc. A 2x Barlow lens will effectively double the power of the eyepiece you are using. Do not use the erecting eyepiece for anything other than land viewing. Erecting eyepieces generally reduce the amount of light reaching your eye and thus reduce brightness of the faint objects in the sky.
So basically just place the 25 mm lens in the focuser and point the scope at the moon and you will be amazed at what you can see and how bright it is.

Dec 30, 2007 | Tasco 350x50mm Refractor Novice Telescopes

1 Answer

Cannot see an image through the lens

I bought one of these telescopes, and had trouble at first, but finally got some decent results. If you dont have any experience with telescopes, I suggest trying it first in daytime, since daytime objects are much better for getting experience. Also, start with the lowest power eyepiece, the 12mm 50x, the one with the largest lens. Start by looking towards something pretty big, like a car or a house, and it needs to be some distance away to even have a chance to get a focus. If your target is closer than about 1/4 mile, you should add the right angle eyepiece attachment to allow you to focus in on closer objects.

When you are finally set up with the low power eyepiece, and have a good big target in the daytime, start looking thru the telescope while turning the knob thru the entire range. At some point of knob turning, you should see some image appear in the eyepiece..Turn the knob slowly to focus it clearly.

And this is for the shaky tripod. If you can hang a book under the middle of the tripod, the added weight will help stabilize the telescope, and you should be able to see a little better, without so much motion at the slightest touch.

After you look at the first car or house, you can start to see how careful you have to be to use the telescope, and you can start to look at other objects. When you move to the higher power 100x eyepiece, it will be even more critical in getting it both aimed and focused. If its off by just a few degrees, you wont see what you are looking for.

When you start nightime viewing, start with the largest object in the sky, the moon. Its the same process as daytime, except the eyepiece mechanism will have to be adjusted a little closer to the main body of the telescope.

Viewing planets and stars will be the ultimate test. Stars and planets are harder to see, since they are small, and hard to see unless they are in focus. When you can see those views, you have passed the telescope test. Its a matter of careful aim, and having the telescope focus set close to the point where you can see objects that are VERY FAR AWAY. If you are able to focus on the moon, you will be fairly close to being able to focus on the planets. The hardest part is actually getting the planet in the view of the telescope, in other words, aiming it.

The last item that can really mess up the view is a fogged up lens. Usually this happens in the summer when the scope has been in the air-conditioned room, and then it fogs up when taken outside. The solution for this is to let the telescope sit outside for 20 minutes, so the fogged lenses can clear. By the way, the same fogging may happen when you bring the telescope inside during the winter.

I hope this helps you eventually get a clear view of some amazing views in the sky. Your final exam is to take a look at the moon, the rings of Saturn, and the moons of Jupiter, some time in the near future. Have Fun!

Nov 14, 2007 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

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