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Subwoofer problem have had 3 different subwoofers on this unit they arent clear they hum something is wrong. Can you help me?

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Re: Subwoofer problem - Sony STR-DE835 Receiver Audio & Video Receivers

Are they self powered?

Posted on Dec 19, 2007

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Loud hum from subwoofer

The number-one cause of subwoofer/speaker hum is the coaxial cable connecting your cable or satellite receiver to your provider (either through an inground run to a cable box or through a satellite dish). Here is how you test for this:
  1. Turn your system on and get it to produce the hum by watching a movie. Pause your DVD or videotape so that the hum is all you hear.
    TIPDon't use a normal cable or satellite program for this; you're about to disconnect the cable that provides the audio and video for your cable/satellite feed.
  2. Find the coaxial cable running from your cable or satellite receiver to your service provider, and while listening to the hum, unscrew the connector and disconnect the cable.
Did the hum stop or reduce by a large amount? If so, the cable you disconnected is the source of the noise. If this is the problem, you have several ways to fix the issue permanently (if not, jump ahead to the next section):
  1. Call your cable or satellite company and ask for a service call. Sometimes you get a smart cable guy, and if you demonstrate the problem he can do something upstream to ground the coaxial cable and remove or reduce the hum.
  2. Buy a power strip that has F connectors as part of its surge protection. Plug the strip into the AC outlet and feed your main coaxial signal through these connectors. This ties the shielding of the coax (the source of the noise) to your AC ground and sometimes can solve the problem.
    WARNINGOddly enough, this solution (surge protection) can sometimes increase the humming.
  3. Go to your local RadioShack store and buy three inexpensive items: a Matching Transformer (part #15-1253), an Indoor/Outdoor Matching Transformer (#15-1140), and a Cable Coupler (#278-304). Connect your coaxial cable to the cable coupler, and then to the first matching transformer. The output is two screws for the old two-wire antenna wire. Your indoor/outdoor matching transformer has two connectors for the screws, and the other end is a coaxial connector. Hook your cable or satellite receiver into this connector and see if the hum goes away.
Here is why this trick works: the first transformer converts your 75-ohm coax into a 300-ohm antenna connector. The second transformer converts the 300-ohm back to a 75-ohm connector. The humming, which usually is at around 60 Hz, can't pass through these conversions.

Ground Loop Hum

The second cause of hum is called a ground loop, and it almost always shows up right after you bring home a brand-new, self-powered subwoofer, or perhaps an external amplifier.
Take a look at all the plugs on the power cords on your home theater equipment. In most systems, the receiver (or amplifier) has a three-prong power plug, but most of your other devices have only two-prong plugs. This is not by accident; the device with the three-prong power plug is grounded. This means that device "owns" the ground. As long as no other power device has a three-prong plug, everything works well.
When you bring home a self-powered subwoofer and plug it in, though, you might notice it has a three-prong plug; this is for safety reasons. However, when you connect an RCA cable from your receiver to your subwoofer and turn everything on, you suddenly notice a loud hum.
The external amplifier in your subwoofer is now fighting with the amplifier in your receiver for possession of the ground. Both devices want to define 0.00 volts. But because the wiring in the two amplifiers to your household AC ground is different, one device is really using 0.001 volt and the other device uses something closer to 0.003 volts. The subwoofer cable connects the two, and the fighting begins.
You have to stop these two devices from trying to own the ground, or get them to not "see" each other. First, make your system produce the humming noise. Disconnect the single RCA cable between your receiver and subwoofer. Did the noise stop? If so, you have a ground loop issue.
The proper, safest way to solve this problem is to buy a special subwoofer cable with little arrows on the wire to show the signal direction (see ).
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Figure 1. Subwoofer cable with directional arrowUnfortunately, many people have been ridiculed when asking about these sorts of cables at their local electronics store: "But cables don't really have a direction. My expert friend at work laughed at me when I asked about this!" Yes, your friend is right. Cables don't have a direction, but these little arrows indicate that this cable will prevent or solve your ground loop problem.
Remember when I said the hum started when you connected the RCA cable? That RCA cable really contains two wires: the center wire and something called the shield. The center wire carries the audio signal, but the shield tries to define 0.00 volts. The shield is the wire that lets the two different components (the receiver or amplifier, and the subwoofer) see each other's ground, and causes the fight. What if you took your subwoofer cable and disconnected the shielding from just one end? Wouldn't that solve the problem? Yes, it would. This is exactly what a subwoofer cable with little arrows does. The shield is not connected at both ends. The shield has to be connected at one end, for connecting to your receiver or amp, so you should run the cable so that the arrows show the flow from the receiver to the subwoofer.
WARNINGIt is unsafe to use a two-prong to three-prong "cheater" plug on the subwoofer power cord to solve the hum problem. Even if the subwoofer came with a cheater plug in the box, it's REALLY not safe to do. Don't do it.

Sep 01, 2013 | Denon Audio & Video Receivers

2 Answers

I have a Boston Acoustics VR-500 Subwoofer with a problem. As soon as anything is plugged into the line level RCA jacks, the subwoofer produces a loud buzz/hum. I have tried connecting it to the subwoofer...

I'm thinking you have an open shield ground on the RCA input side. Connecting speaker inputs possibly restores the ground. Try connecting the high level inputs then disconnect the remote end of the cables (floating the grounds).

Then get out an ohmmeter and find that open circuitor or bad solder joint between RCA ground and real ground in the speaker's amplifier. Or.... if speaker ground kills the hum and you want to use RCA Line Level input to the sub, just connect one minus speaker output on your source amp to one minus on the sub's amp.

Mar 01, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Subwoofer not working.... JVC surround sound system 778V Subwoofer Part Number SP-PW37-SUB I hear a hum coming from unit so there's power going to it. I hear weak bass thumps with volume turned all the way...

A connectivity check could provide the solution, notice any wrong wire connections on device or any other devices requiring interconnection. The woofer would perform properly when the connections that provide current for woofing are approapiate

important notes
1. Trace the connection from Recorder or sound output to the woofer device
2. The wiring connections should be sound and video ouput into sound and video output into woofer.
3. The connections if any problems would be located at the stereo recorder or device producing the spund and video. Check the connections of wires on the recorder device ensuring rewiriing
4. finally, adjust the equalisers if any the buttoms could have been disbled by master switch hindering full blaster boost sound.

Dec 05, 2010 | JVC RX-778V

1 Answer

There is no sound coming out of the subwoofer

I assume it's an active subwoofer, since it hums. Did you activate sub in the receiver menu? Did you turn up the volume on the sub?

Jul 08, 2010 | Yamaha HTR-5840 Receiver

1 Answer

Subwoofer hum from STR-DH800

That points pretty much to a bad shield on the cable. Have you tried another one? Another thing to try is to rotate the AC power cord on the sub (if it has one). Sorry, too lazy to look it up.

Dec 29, 2009 | Sony STR-DH800

2 Answers

Kube 2 subwoofer hum

The Kube Sub-woofer is earthed via its 3 pin plug. The Onkyo and other components I have in my system are not (they are double insulated). During normal operation, a difference in electrical potential can exist between these components in the system. I found that this potential was finding a path to earth via the audio cable and on through the subwoofer's earth. The path was via the earth portion of the audio cable and so gave the hum irrespective of volume levels set either on the Onkyo or the sub.

The fix is to ground the Onkyo to the sub. I used a length of electrical cable between a panel mounting screw on the back of the sub and a screw on the casing at the rear of the Onkyo. Try it out with a piece of cable manually touching screws with the bare ends of the cable until you find ones that give continuity( the hum will go immediately). I then crimped a small fork end electrical fitting onto each end of the cable which can be slid under the slighly loosened screw head and resecured. All I hear now is the fan on the Blu-Ray player!

Jan 31, 2009 | Onkyo TX-SR606 Receiver

4 Answers

No sound from Sub Pre-out on Onkyo TX-SR606

Also, it could possibly the preout terminal itself that is not working. One way to prove that is by transferring the subwoofer cable from the preout and temporarily transfer it to the tape out section. If it ouputs sound from there, then that means the speaker and the cables are working fine and it's just the preout terminal itself that is not picking up anything. ^_^

Dec 16, 2008 | Onkyo TX-SR606 Receiver

1 Answer

No subwoofer output

1. Try twisting the RCA plugs from CD player and see if they are not connecting right.
2. Replace the cable from the Cd player to the receiver
3. Try a different input
4. Try a different CD player

See if any of those solve your issue. Replacing the cable worked for me one time

Aug 30, 2008 | Yamaha RX-V995 Receiver

2 Answers

Thumping Subwoofer

Ive seen this problem in alot of audio setups in vehicles but most peeps dont know this is not a good thing and will cause damage to your woofers or amp. 99% of the time it turns out to be as you said that bad boy muting circuit. alot of these curcuits do use separate transitors or diodes as mute switches but most of them are directly from the Microproccessor. Only way to trouble shoot this is with a schematic and a good car stereo tech. Good luck

May 25, 2006 | Yamaha RX-V2200 Receiver

1 Answer

Connecting subwoofer to receiver.

have u checked that the sub option on the reciver is on?

Jan 06, 2006 | Kenwood 107VR

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