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Thomann dp 30

Hi, One of the keys on Thomann DP-30 dig. piano plays much louder that others. Would it possible to fix it at home or a specialist is required? Thank you

Posted by Anonymous on

6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

hamhm
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: Yamaha digital piano clp 170

This is a common problem with Yamaha keyboards. The problem is caused by worn-out rubber contacts in the keyboard assembly. In my old Clavinova CLP-500, there was one long rubber contact strip under the keys with two parallel strips of semiconductor material. The Clavinova circuitry determines key velocity by measuring the timing between when the key hits the first and second strips of semiconductor material. The harder you play a key, the less time it takes the key to hit the second semiconductor strip after hitting the first.
After years of playing the keyboard, the keys eventually cause tears in the semiconductor material and this messes up the timing measurement for key velocity. The only solution is to take the keyboard apart and replace the rubber contact strip with a new one.
I got rid of my CLP-500 four or five years ago and got a new CLP-170. The CLP-170 is now having exactly the same problem that the CLP-500 had. Yamaha has re-designed the rubber contacts in the CLP-170 so that there are now eight individual contact strips instead of one long one. The problem is essentially the same, though. You have to take the keyboard apart and replace the worn out rubber contacts.
Here are the part numbers for the rubber contacts that need to be replaced in the CLP-170: V8286600 Rubber Contact, 12 keys, D-C#   Qty. 6 V8286800 Rubber Contact, 11 keys, A-C#   Qty. 1 V8286700 Rubber Contact, 5 keys, D-C   Qty. 1
I suggest you also get a copy of the CLP-170 service manual, part number 001677. It has descriptions of all the steps necessary to take the thing apart and put it back together again. You'll also need a "rod" (which is just a long dowel), part number TX000670. Before you take the circuit boards off the keyboard assembly, you have to insert the dowel between the keys and the frame to keep the keys from falling back and getting in your way. A 5-foot long 1/4-inch dowel will probably work. (I haven't yet taken apart my CLP-170, and I don't have Yamaha's "rod," so I'm not sure if 1/4 inch is the right size or not. I'll report back here if it's not.)
Good luck, Howard

Posted on Sep 27, 2008

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: How doI open a Yamaha P120 to fix sticky keys?

I've had the very same problem twice so far. The only solution I figured is to simpy purchase an equivalent key (contact Yamaha service in your country for this) and to replace the broken one. The reason why the key doesn't work smoothly as the other one is not dirt therefore any cleaning won't help. The key is cracked deep in the place where it's attached to its 'axis'. So you'll need to remove all the screws and unmount the cover (it needs a sideshift to open once the screws are removed), be careful with the speaker wires. However you'll need firm moves anyway. Opening is tricky and gets me surprised anytime I do it so you'll need some courage :). Replacing the key is even more tricky. You'll have to remove the broken one by pulling it horizontaly (use some force, it's broken anyway). Placing a new key you'll need to uplift the 'hammer' and then slide a new one. I'm sure you'll figure it out once you see it with your own eyes (it's really hard to decribe but not so hard to do it). Hope you'll do fine. I haven't tried glueing the crack for I doubt it would work for long. Good luck!

Posted on Feb 07, 2009

  • 4 Answers

SOURCE: Roland DP-2 pedal not functioning correctly.

There are two types of damper pedal switches, on that is closed until you press it, and one that closes when your press it. It sounds like your Casio is expecting one type and your Roland pedal is the other type. A quick way to test this is to plug a guitar cable into the Casio pedal input and see if the keyboard sustains. If it does, then your Casio requires an "normally closed" switch.

Some pedals have a small switch near the cord or even on the bottom of the pedal that will reverse the switching operation (BOSS pedals, a division of Roland, have this feature). If you can find that, then change the switch position and you should be OK.

If not, and you feel like digging into your pedal, you could take the bottom off of the pedal and check out the switch itself. Many pedals use a switch that can be used either way. The clue will be on the switch itself. If there is an extra tab on the switch that is unused, then switch the wire that is furthest away from that tab to that tab. This will probably involve soldering, but it is nearly impossible to damage anything.
If moving the wire that is furthest away does not do anything, then try putting that wire back and switching the other one.

If your pedal does NOT have an extra tab, you're SOL, unless you want to buy a replacement switch (unsure of make). If this is the case, you are probably better off getting a different damper pedal - preferably one that is marketed as "universal"

Posted on Jul 02, 2009

Hacklet
  • 18 Answers

SOURCE: Roland 3000 Digital Piano 88-Key Full-size weighted keyboard

It's not really for the faint of heart, but generally this is caused by gunk getting into the key circutry. Underlying the 3000's keyboard is a silicone pad with 2 contacts on it, the measurement between each being hit is the issue usually but yours just sounds like there's something in there causing a physical or contact obstruction.

What you really want to do is to remove the keys and clean everything but this isn't easy... You could try using 99% alcohol (from a pharmacy) to clean inside it which may well help you.

There's a good thread on a similar issue at:

http://www.electronicspoint.com/roland-hp-3000s-digital-piano-dodgy-note-t18946.html

Which may help you work out how to do the disassembly if you are brave, but I would start with pouring some alcohol in and poking it and hoping for the best 1st. It sounds crude, but it works amazingly well with some things.

Posted on Jul 12, 2009

  • 74 Answers

SOURCE: roland hp550g digital piano has a couple of dropped keys

Power off the unit. Disconnect all cables that plug into the speaker base if you have one - It may be wise to document the individual wires to make their reinstallation easier. Remove the unit from the speaker stand and lay it on the floor on something like an old towel - you may get some dark colored grease on the rug. Remove the screws only for the bottom rear, not the front - you don't need to remove them. Do this by gently turning the unit upside down. Only remove the screws from the sides/rear bottom, and note which screw types you removed from where. Once all bottom rear screws are removed gently return the unit right side up. now pivot the top rear cover - the sides of the cover are attached to the rear - pivot it toward the back. No need to remove the ribbon cables - just let the top lay there or prop it up with something if the ribbon cables don't have enough slack for the top cover to lay flat on its back. You should now be looking at all of the keys uncovered. notice the rear of each key is where it hinges. You'll notice the grease at the hinge point. The keys are thin plastic so you must take care not to damage them. The way to remove a key is to spread the ears at the hinge point of the key you want to remove. I use a screwdriver sharpened to a point, but a large pair of needle nose pliers work good too. You insert the tapered point of the tool between the ears gently to spread them far enough to just clear the pins. Once they are spread wide enough you'll feel them disengage. Each key also has two hooks located side by side towards the front of the key on the bottom side - they are not visable until the hinge is released, but you must realise they are there or you'll either snap the key back onto the hinge or not be able to pull the key out once you've got it off the hinge. Pivot the key towards you to remove it. What you now have in your hand is not the defective part. You have the top that is touched when playing the keyboard. The defective part is still setting in the mechanism. What's actually happened is the keys are made of very thin plastic where they are glued around the weight and this plastic breaks leaving the weighted end down there somewhere. Examine where the key top came from and how it works. The key top is the part you took off of the hinge. You can see how the keys on each side work and you'll also see what is missing from the mechanism for the key you're working on. To make things easier I always remove one additional key top on each side of a key that I repair to make access easier. Just place the other keys you remove right behind the key area in the order you took them off so it'll be obvious how they go back on. Now the broken weighted mechanism you can lift right out. Actually you can lift it out easier with the weighted end broken off, but once you glue it back together you can still get it in there without to much trouble. You only need to remove the damaged weighted mechanism for the key you're repairing. I remove the key tops on each side of the damaged key for visability only. Take your pair of needle nose pliers and pick out the broken end. Now fit it onto the end of the weighted mechanism in preparation for glueing - just so you can see how it's going to go on there. I use a high quality modeling super glue. Before I came across this glue I used JB Weld, but it takes a few hours to dry. The high quality super glue allows you to put everything back together immediately. Installation is reverse of removal: Snake the weighted mechanism back in once you've repaired it - you can always examine those on each side if you get confused. Hook the key top front first then smoothly snap in place the hinge ears over the pins. Make sure to check the movement of the repaired key, and check also to see if anymore keys are setting lower as they may be in process of breaking off. Once all keys are repaired, carefull lower the top rear cover onto the key assembly. While holding the cover onto the key assembly/base, gently turn the unit over onto its back and reinstall the screws. Should be all washer headed screws - do not over tighten. Check the keys again. Set the keyboard onto its base (if it came with one) and you're done. A little practice and it'll take you less than a half hour to fix the key and get it back together

Posted on Sep 23, 2010

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The Previa key construction was a lot better than yamaha\'s, however it still suffered the normal casualties caused by even the slightest \'knock\'. Believe it or not, most damages are caused to DPs when you\'re NOT playing it. For example, transporting - setting up - packing down etc. I used to market Roland and Casio DPs for a number of years. And the most common problem was the \'stuck key\' syndrome (as well as dust on the contacts). I bought it down to the way people, children, adults actually SIT down to the piano to play. Instead of using the piano stool to balance themselves, many people place their hands on the KEYBOARD before they plant !!! NO NO NO :/ That is the prime reason there are key breakages in - pretty much the same place. Children are a classic example when they sit at a piano. They use the keyboard to leverage themselves UP. Because the DP is not on, it doesn\'t make a sound - therefore "it can\'t POSSIBLY my child\'s fault!!" Oh yeah...have your darling angel sit at an acoustic piano and they\'ll be playing 12th Street Rag before they even get their on the seat!!!



Long and short, possibly broken band, slipped hammer - or broken. Here\'s a video which explains how you might be able to fix the problem yourself. Not much to it really...just take your time and don\'t force anything

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uToVbDDVC0



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***Please read this reply in its entirity because there's more information way down at the bottom of the reply. Now the below Pro-Audio International Supplier Thormanne, had the power supply for the Numark FX5000. That's where I bought mine and it was shipped fairly quickly. Also here's the part number from my order so you know you're getting the very specific power supply the FX5000 requires.***

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There are two types of damper pedal switches, on that is closed until you press it, and one that closes when your press it. It sounds like your Casio is expecting one type and your Roland pedal is the other type. A quick way to test this is to plug a guitar cable into the Casio pedal input and see if the keyboard sustains. If it does, then your Casio requires an "normally closed" switch.

Some pedals have a small switch near the cord or even on the bottom of the pedal that will reverse the switching operation (BOSS pedals, a division of Roland, have this feature). If you can find that, then change the switch position and you should be OK.

If not, and you feel like digging into your pedal, you could take the bottom off of the pedal and check out the switch itself. Many pedals use a switch that can be used either way. The clue will be on the switch itself. If there is an extra tab on the switch that is unused, then switch the wire that is furthest away from that tab to that tab. This will probably involve soldering, but it is nearly impossible to damage anything.
If moving the wire that is furthest away does not do anything, then try putting that wire back and switching the other one.

If your pedal does NOT have an extra tab, you're SOL, unless you want to buy a replacement switch (unsure of make). If this is the case, you are probably better off getting a different damper pedal - preferably one that is marketed as "universal"

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It's not really for the faint of heart, but generally this is caused by gunk getting into the key circutry. Underlying the 3000's keyboard is a silicone pad with 2 contacts on it, the measurement between each being hit is the issue usually but yours just sounds like there's something in there causing a physical or contact obstruction.

What you really want to do is to remove the keys and clean everything but this isn't easy... You could try using 99% alcohol (from a pharmacy) to clean inside it which may well help you.

There's a good thread on a similar issue at:

http://www.electronicspoint.com/roland-hp-3000s-digital-piano-dodgy-note-t18946.html

Which may help you work out how to do the disassembly if you are brave, but I would start with pouring some alcohol in and poking it and hoping for the best 1st. It sounds crude, but it works amazingly well with some things.

Dec 29, 2008 | Yamaha NP 30 76 Key Lightweight Digital...

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