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Marine4@rcn.com how do you check the resistence with a multimeter and what should the reading be. Thanks

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My gilera seems to have voltage drop and cause my engine to cut off when i press my brake.


Hi, Herman the following is a comprehensive charging system test that is guaranteed to the find issue with your system.
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf

Feb 21, 2017 | Gilera Motorcycles

1 Answer

What could be wrong when charging system doesn't work?


Hi, Dwayne the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website
1.Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & rotor If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter lead.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
How to Test Your Motorcycle Charging System
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
How to Test Motorcycle Charging System

Jan 20, 2017 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

2005 vl 1500 charging system system not charging checked generator 3 wires giving pluss 80v at 5000rpm instaled new rectifier voltage across battery under 13 volts could faulty battery be problem


Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website
1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.crowitis.com/images/VL1500_Charging_System_Wiring_Upgrades.pdf
stator output voltage
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Suzuki VL1500 Service Manual
OEM parts for Suzuki
Suzuki VZ1500 Owner Manual

Jan 16, 2017 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Tem my briggs portable generator has no spark it appears ignition coil has failed. Items checked. disconnected kill wire to coil, disconnected oil sensor wire no spark this will be the 2nd coil


Test the coil electrically
A digital multimeter is required for testing the resistance levels of the ignition coil. The terminals of the coil are going to be marked "negative" and "positive," and these are the two points where the resistance of primary winding can be measured. Step 1: Prepare the multimeter
To check a 12 volt coil, set the multimeter to at least a 200 Ohms setting. Attach both leads of the meter to the coil-terminals with black to the negative terminal and red to the positive one.
Step 2: Test the resistance
The normal, acceptable range for a standard 12-volt car is 1.5 to 1.7 Ohms. See if the reading is within this range.
Step 3: Test the secondary coil resistance
Set the meter to 20K Ohm setting, and attach the leads to the ignition coil's center terminal. The reading for secondary-coil resistance should be 11, because if it is lower

Oct 26, 2016 | Briggs Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

How do I check the coil on my 8n to verify it is OK?


A digital multimeter is required for testing the resistance levels of the ignition coil. The terminals of the coil are going to be marked "negative" and "positive," and these are the two points where the resistance of primary winding can be measured. Step 1: Prepare the multimeter
To check a 12 volt coil, set the multimeter to at least a 200 Ohms setting. Attach both leads of the meter to the coil-terminals with black to the negative terminal and red to the positive one.
Step 2: Test the resistance
The normal, acceptable range for a standard 12-volt car is 1.5 to 1.7 Ohms. See if the reading is within this range.
Step 3: Test the secondary coil resistance
Set the meter to 20K Ohm setting, and attach the leads to the ignition coil's center terminal. The reading for secondary-coil resistance should be 11, because if it is lower, that's the reason why sparks are not appearing

Oct 19, 2016 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Does any one know what the resistance is acrossed the brown wire that goes from the regulator to the starter soiliniod on a 1992 yamaha golf cart


It is really easy to check this. Go to an electronics store and buy a cheap multimeter. It will cost you about $10 to $15. Set the multimeter to the ohms range and put the leads from the multimeter across what you want to read the resistance of. Done. If you are getting a voltage drop and are trying to find what the problem is, this may not be of much help however, as a high resistance may only show up when current is being drawn, as then resistance increases when faults get hot.

May 21, 2016 | Yamaha Motorcycles

1 Answer

Right side turn signals stopped working one day on my 1982 xj650, put in new flasher in and new bulbs and no change, If I need to do a resistance test on a voltmeter what do I need to do?.An explaination...


Hi dazsculpt,
I would start by checking the fuse for the right turning light. I think it is common for left and right. Check if the left turning light is working. If it is, you can use this as a reference.
Using a multimeter on your Yamaha is the same as using it elsewhere. The only difference is the setting you would use.
Two types of multimeters available are analog and digital. If you do not have a multimeter, I would suggest you purchase a digital.
A digital multimeter gives readings in numbers and is cheaper, whereas an analogue multimeter has a needle, and you have to read the correct scale.
Your multimeter will have instructions. There is a knob on the meter you turn to select the scale - voltage, ohms, amps, and maybe some extras.
The multimeter will probably have several ohm readings to select. You can select the lowest range for a start. Higher ranges measure very low resistance, and can even measure the resistance through your body!
Make sure that there is no power when you use the resistance measurement. Disconnect the battery on the Yamaha. It does not matter which way the leads are to measure resistance, it does for D.C. voltage, like your bike.
Remove both bulbs from the bike - left and right sides. There are two things to measure. The center of the bulb holder, and the housing of the bulb holder. Connect one leads to the center of the bulb holder should, and the other end on the flasher unit wire for that bulb. It should show a zero reading. Take another reading with the first lead still on the center of the bulb holder, and connect the other lead to the housing of the bulb holder. It should not show a reading, as this should be open circuit. If you have a reading, you will probably have a short circuit. Compare left with the right side, and there should be a difference.
Hope this has helped sort out the bike and use a multimeter.

Feb 03, 2014 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

How can i check the charging system on my v star 1100


Hi, Anonymous the following is a comprehensive charging system test that I found on a Rider Groups website 1. Battery Test: The battery needs to be a fully charged battery that has been load tested to ensure proper readings. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Most places like Auto Zone, Advance Auto, and Pep Boys will charge and test motorcycle batteries for free. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test: Start motorcycle, Measure DC Volts across the battery terminals (you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts).
3. Check Connections/Wires: Inspect the regulator/stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection/corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolate the stator & Rotor, If AC Output test Fails and Resistance Check, and Stator IB Test Pass then Rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator
Start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts.
Probe both stator wires with your meter leads.
The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. (Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual for specification)
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator IB test or Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity to ground your stator is shorted to ground.
5. Regulator Test: Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test: This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire.
The reading should be Infinite.
With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires.
The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the links below. Good luck and have a nice day.
http://www.motorcycleforum.com/97-yamaha/94508-charging-issue-my-v-star-1100-a.html
http://www.jetav8r.com/Vision/Stator/fault_finding_by_www.electrosport.com.pdf
Yamaha XVS1100 Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XVS1100 Owner Manual

Jan 20, 2013 | 2000 Yamaha V Star 1100 Custom

1 Answer

How test a thermistor


Hi jorge

Hi
To test your thermistor you will need:
Soldering iron
Multimeter or ohmmeter
Follow the directions below to test your thermistor
1...Set the multimeter to resistance mode lowest setting.
2...Hook up the terminals of the multimeter to leads on the thermistor.
It does not matter which lead goes to the terminals, polarity is not important in this test.
3...Heat the soldering iron then heat the thermistor by moving your heated soldering iron tip to it.
Note: Check the multimeter reading as you are applying this heat.
A properly functioning positive temperature coefficient thermistor will show a smooth and steady increase in the multimeter
resistance reading.
A properly functioning negative temperature coefficient thermistor will show a smooth and steady decrease in the multimeter
resistance reading.
4...Look for other signs that the thermistor is faulty.
A steady reading that does not change, a reading of zero or a reading of infinity are all indications that the thermistor needs to
be replaced.
If the change in the readings is not smooth or if there is not any change, then this could also indicate a faulty thermistor.
Please take time to rate me.
Bud

Oct 31, 2012 | Dryers

2 Answers

Hi Thanks for your help, One year old Sony mini


sir i think ypur unit is ok and run correctly... try to check your speaker maybe your speaker got open or burnt... you can test it by swapping your speaker to another unit or you can test your speaker using multitester...just point your selector at resistance test a speaker has 8ohms reading....


the speaker has a two terminal.. a positive terminal and a negative terminal... your multitester has a two lead.. red lead which is a positive and a black lead which is negative..
measure-speaker-impedance-1.1-800x800.jpg Multimeter probe sockets (NL Graphics) Insert the probes of a digital multimeter in the correct sockets of the multimeter. There may be several different sockets for the probes depending on what parameters you're measuring. Look for the sockets marked "impedance" or displaying the ohm symbol. Different models and brands of multimeters will vary in their labeling, so check your multimeter's manual if you're not certain about which one to use.

  • 2 Select the range for the multimeter. Since you'll be measuring fairly low resistance levels with a speaker, choose a range that will encompass readings in the 2-16 ohm range. It's extremely rare to find speakers that will have an impedance outside of that range.
  • 3 Touch one probe to each of the speaker terminals and check the reading. This will be the impedance of the speaker. Record the measurement, and when you're done, turn off the multimeter to preserve the batteries for the next time you need the multimeter.

  • Read more: How to Measure Speaker Impedance ' eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5068180_measure-speaker-impedance.html#ixzz1OsNOPSq3
    if you think this help please rate me thanks...

    Jun 10, 2011 | Sony CMT-HPZ9 Shelf System

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