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MCCULLOCH by HUSQVARNA GROUP DIGGER POST HOLE MP49 HV682553 Repair Manual

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

  • 2712 Answers

SOURCE: Digger support

Search local home and garden stores to find a post hole digger. Many department stores sell post hole diggers too. A local greenhouse or tractor supply store is also a good place to look for a post hole digger. Decide on he type of digger you'll need for the job. Although post hole diggers come in different sizes and types, they generally dig the same size hole. Know that it takes a lot of strength to dig holes with a post hole digger, but there are a diggers available with special features that allow someone not quite as strong to use the digger too. Pick up and examine the different post hole diggers while you're shopping. Compare the feel and weight of the tools. Pretend to dig holes and see how it handles. Compare the features and designs of different post hole diggers. Most are manufactured from fiberglass or steel, but some have a different shaped handles for specific digging jobs. Determine if you'd rather have a fiberglass handle or a wooden one. Fiberglass is lighter and more resistent to sun damage than wooden handles. Select a post hole digger based on your preferences, the job required and who'll be using the tool. Plan to spend more on a post hole digger that's made from steel or for heavy duty use. The range for a post hole digger is generally under $50.

Posted on Aug 27, 2008

  • 2712 Answers

SOURCE: Digger how to

Hammer rebar into the ground to create pathways for water. Grab a hose and soak the ground to soften it before using the post hole digger. Wait until the water has had a chance to soak in. Raise the post hole digger and drop it, jaws open, into the ground. The jaws will cut into the ground and soften it even more for removal. Continue to use the weight of the post hole digger for the hard work, circling around the edge of the hole. Drop the digger down with force once you've loosened up a circle of soil. Open the handles to grab a bite of earth in the jaws and lift it out. Continue with Steps until you've removed all the loose soil, making a hole 1 foot in diameter.

Posted on Aug 27, 2008

dontbother10
  • 2220 Answers

SOURCE: Chain not getting oil

Extremely difficult! If the oil pump or worm gear is defective it may be the most difficult saw to repair. This is the only saw I have seen with the oiler mounted behind the fly wheel.

Your basic model number is 600035. There are 11-, 21-, and 22- prefixes used with 600035s. There are also a ton of suffixes with the 600035s. I think the suffix is on your saw immediately after the basic model number somewhere (usually on bottom of older Macs along with the serial number. The dash of the serial on older Macs is the prefix). I must defer to you to find your exact IPL, here:
McCulloch IPLs
http://www.ordertree.com/modelinfo/McCulloch/139.59.html

I chose this one as an example "22-600035-58" for an IPL
http://www.ordertree.com/modelinfo/MCC/22-600035-58-Mac-3516-IPL-211229-01/139.22-600035-58-Mac-3516-IPL-211229-01.1.59.1.html
The "Powerhead Assembly" lists an oil pump (1) and a worm gear (10). These are the most common failure on most saws but Macs have many more hoses than most. There are oiler components on at least 2 different details. It appears the oil pump is on the starter side of the engine. and you may need to remove the fly wheel for access. I would examine every connection and perhaps try the "Kit Gear/Plunger Assembly" before trying to access the oil pump and gear.

Oil System Plugged.

  1. Remove the clutch cover, bar, and chain, clean the bar groove, any holes and passages on the rear of the bar (both sides, consider rotating the bar), if equipped with a sprocket nose ensure it rotates easily at least one complete revolution. Clean the saw oiler hole and channel. Insert a blunted, hooked piece of wire through the oil filler hole and pull the hose in the oil tank out. Pay attention to the screen or filter on the free end (clean or replace, difficult to determine serviceability). Start the saw and see if it oils when revved up. If yes reassemble your saw. If no, continue with 2.
  2. Work your way through the linkage cleaning and replacing any defective parts as you go. Carefully check the hoses for cracks especially at bends and connections. Please make extensive notes & some digital pictures will help during reassembly.
If it does not oil on completion of 1 it is most likely a bad oiler or worm gear. Please see the IPL to aid in oiler component identification.

You can reply below with any questions. I hope you found this most helpful. Good Luck
Lou
If you opt to remove the fly wheel PLEASE reply to me first. I can probably save you a couple of headaches and may prevent component breakage.

Posted on Feb 01, 2010

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1 Answer

Pto won't disengage, unable to start tractor. pto attached to post hole digger in ground


It could be gear bound and not allowing it to disengage, i experienced that a few times in my farming days, we dug a lot of postholes with a PTO driven digger. What usually happened is i ended up getting caught on rocks and stalled out because i had the engine speed to low. What i generally had to do to fix it was remove the PTO shaft from the digger, disconnect from the tractors output shaft, then get it started and everything moving, then disengage the PTO and reconnect the post hole digger, then give her hell and get the engine speed up before re-engaging the PTO, that would generally shock it loose. If not then i would have to disconnect the PTO shaft again and spin it backwards by hand to rotate the digger in the opposite direction to remove the hangup.

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Post hole digger gearbox oil leak


If the instructions do not give you an answer to your question and you can't find any information from the manufacture I would proceed as follows. The oil coming out of the breather is due to the splashing of the oil and the heating of the parts as they work building up pressure. I would tend to believe that as long as there is some coming out there is enough oil to take care of the gearbox.
If there is a separate plug to remove to add oil to the gearbox I would use that as my fill level. I hope this helps.

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Mcculloch 1435 chainsaw-Bar is not getting any oil with the tank full


Duplicate Post
Operator’s Manual
http://weborder.husqvarna.com/order_static/doc/MOEN/MOEN2006/MOEN2006_V000249498.pdf
IPL – all oiler components are illustrated here:
http://weborder.husqvarna.com/order_static/doc/MIPL/MIPL2003/MIPL2003_VP0302015.pdf
Oil System Plugged.
  1. Remove the clutch cover, bar, and chain, clean the bar groove, any holes and passages on the rear of the bar (both sides, consider rotating the bar), if equipped with a sprocket nose ensure it rotates easily at least one complete revolution. Clean the saw oiler hole and channel. Insert a blunted, hooked piece of wire through the oil filler hole and pull the hose in the oil tank out. Pay attention to the screen or filter on the free end (clean or replace, difficult to determine serviceability).
CAUTION: I am not familiar with what hazards may present on an electric saw with the bar and chain removed.
  1. Start the saw and see if it oils when revved up. If yes reassemble your saw. If no, continue with 2.
  2. Work your way through the linkage cleaning and replacing any defective parts as you go. Carefully check the hoses for cracks especially at bends and connections. If equipped with an oil pump it is usually behind the clutch (clutch is a left handed thread). Please make extensive notes & some digital pictures will help during reassembly.
If it does not oil on completion of 2 it is most item 44, try to determine what drives it. Listen or gently touch it to verify operation. Please see the IPL to aid in oiler component identification.

You can reply below if I can be of further assistance, I hope you find this helpful.
Lou
Duplicate answer

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1 Answer

Badger plus auger runs, but the auger doesn't spin


Here's a online free manual you can download and print for a Tanaka post hole digger, as your title stated that's what you have.

http://www.tanaka-usa.com/pdf/manuals/TIA-340-350S.pdf

However, I noticed that you wrote you have a Badger Plus auger, so I tried to find info on that, but a manual doesn's exist outside the manufacturer, you can call them to see if they'll mail you one.

I's suggest you look at the gearbox, as it sounds as if you've sheared a key inside the gearbox on the main drive shaft, based on your description. The gear box is straightforward with a simple 12:1 gear reduction ratio and uses only two (2) gear wheels and shafts.

I couldn't attach the picture but here's a link that will show the gear box, just scroll down once it loads. It should be easy to open and repair the gearbox, as there isn't much to it. Drain the gear oil and separate the halves and you can check for a sheared key on either of the gear wheels and replace the broken one. They're designed to shear to prevent damaging the more expensive gear wheels, etc.

http://www.gemplers.com/docs/IS/RFM100.pdf

Hope you find this Very Helpful and best regards!

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Digger how to


Hammer rebar into the ground to create pathways for water. Grab a hose and soak the ground to soften it before using the post hole digger. Wait until the water has had a chance to soak in. Raise the post hole digger and drop it, jaws open, into the ground. The jaws will cut into the ground and soften it even more for removal. Continue to use the weight of the post hole digger for the hard work, circling around the edge of the hole. Drop the digger down with force once you've loosened up a circle of soil. Open the handles to grab a bite of earth in the jaws and lift it out. Continue with Steps until you've removed all the loose soil, making a hole 1 foot in diameter.

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1 Answer

Digger support


Search local home and garden stores to find a post hole digger. Many department stores sell post hole diggers too. A local greenhouse or tractor supply store is also a good place to look for a post hole digger. Decide on he type of digger you'll need for the job. Although post hole diggers come in different sizes and types, they generally dig the same size hole. Know that it takes a lot of strength to dig holes with a post hole digger, but there are a diggers available with special features that allow someone not quite as strong to use the digger too. Pick up and examine the different post hole diggers while you're shopping. Compare the feel and weight of the tools. Pretend to dig holes and see how it handles. Compare the features and designs of different post hole diggers. Most are manufactured from fiberglass or steel, but some have a different shaped handles for specific digging jobs. Determine if you'd rather have a fiberglass handle or a wooden one. Fiberglass is lighter and more resistent to sun damage than wooden handles. Select a post hole digger based on your preferences, the job required and who'll be using the tool. Plan to spend more on a post hole digger that's made from steel or for heavy duty use. The range for a post hole digger is generally under $50.

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