Question about DBX 1231 Home Equalizer

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DBX 119 I have the opportunity to use a DBX 119, to record old DBX encoded tapes. The unit does not have a manual, and the labels on the connections are totally confusing. Can anyone help?

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I need help how a dbx1231 works, or a home page where I can get some assistant of information

Posted on Mar 04, 2009

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Thanks for the reply. I have sorted it out. The left hand connections are input, and the right hand connections are output. All the rest of the labels appear to be obfuscation. DBX appear to have had some great engineers who lack literacy,or someone with a sick sense of humour.cheers, kingdog

Posted on Nov 30, 2007

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Thanks for the reply. I have sorted it out. The left hand connections are input, and the right hand connections are output. All the rest of the labels appear to be obfuscation. DBX appear to have had some great engineers who lack literacy,or someone with a sick sense of humour.

Posted on Nov 30, 2007

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Do you mean you are just going to play back dbx-encode tapes that have already been recorded? Or both playback and record new material? Please explain.

Posted on Nov 24, 2007

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1 Answer

How can I get an instruction manual?


Recording from tape is very similar to recording from the turntable, but you have to select tape as the source. There will be a button labelled something like PHONO/TAPE/AUX with which you select TAPE and then record as you would for a vinyl disc but you press play on the tape instead of playing a record. Here's something very similar which should help you. Good luck and I hope you get to save your memories.

http://www.teac.com/content/downloads/products/755/lp-r550usb_om_efs_va.pdf

May 12, 2014 | ANDERS NICHOLSON USB Turntable With CD...

1 Answer

Only sound from 1 channel but view meters working on both channels Techniques RS-B18


On the easy side it could be a dirty switch. On the hard side it might need to go to a Technician as there could be an open capacitor or other component failure. The unit can be fixed if given to the right person who is familiar with the cassette deck repair. I have been doing it for 40 some years so far.
IF you need my help, E mail me [email protected]

Oct 27, 2012 | Technics Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Hook up for dbx model 224 type 2


Handy private archive of dbx reference material and service manuals...
http://vintagedbx.free.fr/dbx.html

dbx searchable...
http://www.dbxpro.com/
http://www.dbxpro.com/Classic_resources.php


The manual for the 224X which is different in that it adds front panel lightshow and level adjustments. Otherwise, functionally the same.

http://vintagedbx.free.fr/doc/22-222-224_II.pdf

Be advised that this is a two-ended system that must be used on Playback if it is used on Record. Don't bother using it for anything but analog TAPE. CDR-Audio has plenty of dynamic range and no noise floor to speak of.

If you dont already have one, I advise you to get a dbx 400x or 400x-ds to manage the 224 and any other processors you may have. It is an amazing piece of equipment that allows you to place 3 processor loops before or after the encode/decode loop, or bypass them altogether or in any combination, PLUS you can dub encoded or non-encoded music to or from either encoded or non-encoded music unlike the previous dbx 200 or 200x. I have the 224x plus a 400x and a number of other dbx, Pioneer, BSR, Carver, BBE, SAE and ADC goodies; and have created some impressive cassettes back in the day, given the limitations in speed stability. Now-a-days I make impressive CD's of old analog source recordings with improved dynamics, less noise and zero wow and flutter.

Look for a 400x on eBay. Snipe it at the last 10 seconds if you don't want to bid against yourself..

http://cgi.ebay.com/DBX-400x-Program-Route-Selector-/250818700329?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a65f5a429

May 16, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

2 Answers

Hello: I just purchased a DBX 128 and have no idea how to connect it up. I would like to listen to my records as well as tape using the expansion mode. However, it seems like it only hooks up to my tape...


Part 1

Let's establish a couple of things first.

1) You already have the turntable part working.
2) Your receiver has a defeatable Tape Loop.

Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.


The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.


In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).


Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.


The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.


EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.


In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that

Mar 10, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Will the tascam dx-4d dbx work with regular mixer? Or do you have to have a reel to reel for this to work?


Of course it will work, as any processor would, but this type of encode/decode noise reduction is really for media that have inherent noise to begin with, like analog tape. Digital recording on media with reasonable dynamic range capabilities would not benefit from it.

If you DID ENcode your recordings with something like dbx noise reduction you would have to DEcode it for proper playback, so you would be dependent on its availability for playback.

Jan 28, 2011 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

How do you connect the dbx eq to a home stereo system


Be advised that the engagement of any device in a Tape Monitor loop on a late-model Audio/Video Receiver will effectively tie the receiver down to stereo-only analog sound reproduction. I'll explain.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically convert ed to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose a STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? They would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up: Receiver Tape- or VCR Out to the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-In; Receiver Tape- or VCR In from the External Processor (EQ, whatever) Preamp-, Amp-, Tape- or Rec-Out.

So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks.

[Or you could obtain a dbx Program Route Selector (check eBay, I highly recommend the 400x, of which I have two) and it would, while only using one receiver Tape Loop, allow for three discrete attachment paths for processors and three for tape decks with the added flexibility of front-panel selection of any and all, with the processors being before, after or between the source or tape decks. Plus it has a dedicated facility for an inline dbx Noise Reduction Processor that can also be juggled around via pushbuttons. Pretty neat.]

Jan 10, 2011 | DBX 215 Home Equalizer

1 Answer

When playing a tape on the right side the drive will stop as if at the end of the tape. This is during playback, seems to be random and may happen several times. Also, What is the difference between...


First - your drive problem. Nearly all tape decks use belts to drive the various parts from a single motor. When belts get old, dirty, or worn, they slip. At some point, if the tape gets a bit "heavy" the belt doesn't have the torque to keep things moving. You can try cleaning the belt if you can get to it. Use some isopropyl alcohol and a lint free paper towel. This may only provide a temporary fix and a new belt may be needed. If you have one of the high-end direct drive units (rare in side by side decks) then the drive motor has an issue.
Ah Dolby. Where to start. To answer your question as asked, B and C refer to different "curves" used by the Dolby to reduce tape noise.B came first obviously. The real issue with ANY Dolby is that it is a 2 part system. A tape must be encoded with a Dolby unit for proper playback with Dolby. So, you would have to know that the tape was recorded with Dolby B and you would select Dolby B for playback. The Dolby will "appear" to reduce noise on any tape because it will roll off the high frequencies but the frequency response will be all messed up. To further complicate this mess, any Dolby circuit really needs to be properly calibrated to work 100% as intended. In consumer gear, this is nearly impossible so they settled for a close approximation. In pro studios, Dolby encoded tapes included set up tones at the front of the tape so the engineer doing the playback could align his system to the recording system. All that complexity is why DBX came along with their system but Dolby had good marketing and it was "close enough" that people liked the hiss reduction even when applied to a non-encoded tape. Of course, people tolerate MP3s for the convenience too.
Anyway, hope that helps. Look for the Dolby symbol on the recorded tape. If it is there, it will tell you if it is B or C curve - select accordingly. If not- it probably was not encoded and you'd have better frequency response using the "off" setting.

Oct 23, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

I'm trying to connect a dbx 128 and 118 to my adcom565 preamp, teac tape deck, onkyo tuner, anf radio shack cd recorder, but i'm not sure it can be done. Can anyone help me?


Of course it can be done.

I'm wondering, what's the NEW piece of this puzzle? New dbx gear?

The preamp has two tape loops plus a processor loop (essentially 3 tape loops). You can discount the tuner for this discussion as it already has a dedicated port.

Here's what I would do (and have done *). Get yourself a dbx 400 or dbx 400x Program Route Selector and simplify all of your current and future analog hookup options.

(* I, too, have a CD recorder and a tape deck plus some different dbx units (4bx, 110x-ds; 224) and other toys.)

One on eBay at $59 (a steal so far) expiring Mar 9:
http://cgi.ebay.com/DBX-400X-Sound-Processor_W0QQitemZ270540334138QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item3efd75e43a

and a link to the manual so you can see how it works:

http://www.dbxpro.com/product_downloads/Owner_Manuals/400%20Owners%20Manual.pdf

It takes up ONE tape loop and allows attachment of 3 processors and 3 tape decks PLUS a dbx-style noise reduction system if you have one; and can logically rearrange the processors to be in line with any source and BEFORE, AFTER or BETWEEN tape decks with or without the Noise Reduction Processor involved, all via front panel illuminated buttons.

If you don't want to go the 400x way your options are severely limited re: the tape deck because even though the dbx processors can fit in nicely on the preamp, I don't think the preamp can place them in front of AND after the tape decks, depending on your desires for pre- or post-processing.

Mar 02, 2010 | Bose 901 VI Main / Stereo Speaker

1 Answer

In line eq


The EQ is probably 2-channel so maybe we need to consider what you COULD accomplish with it even if you could use it. Whatever it does to the analog source material will affect all of your speakers if you use simulated surround modes. BTW, I use an old analog EQ myself but not for room correction purposes, mostly for recording. My receiver has an single explicit Tape Mon function through which I have a dbx 224x Program Route Selector and a mess of analog sound processing devices plus a CD-R but using just the one Monitor. I'd still go ahead if I were you.

Of your MD/Tape; CD-R; VCR 1 or 2 connectors, I would think one of them would probably funtion mostly like a Tape Mon as you understand it.

The manual leads me to advise that you DO NOT connect anything digital to the Digital Inputs that correspond to your chosen EQ loop. It's due to some automation that prefers a digital signal over an analog one. Should you be taping something and suddenly turn on any digital input corresponding to your analog one the unit would probably switch sources on you.

I think you understand what Tape Mon is all and how it should act so I'd say try the various analog inputs that have INs & OUTs to see how they work. I'd tune an FM station and hook up the EQ then and see if selecting its function kills the FM audio. I'm really surprised the manual doesn't discuss Monitoring a recording.

Page 12 in the manual has a number of warnings regarding keeping things turned ON if you use these connectors for recording.

Good luck.

Apr 06, 2009 | Yamaha RX-V800 Receiver

1 Answer

Teac X-10 connections to a dbx 224


connect the x10 outputs to the dbx 224 line in connect the dbx 224 outputs to the cd recorder anlog line in windman

Jan 29, 2006 | Pioneer PD-R509 CD Recorder

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