Question about Dell (58GGC) Motherboard

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No Power Up State

The computer is a Dell Dimension (300?). It uses the standard 24 pin supply. The computer will not power up. With the PSU disconnected or connected to the MB I can read approximately 5V on the Supply voltage pin and +3.85V on the Power On pin which I believe to be correct in the PSU off state. This computer uses a power switch/USB circuit card for power up. I have tested this card in another unit and it functioned normally. I measured +3.84V on input connector and across switch (switch open) as well as 0V (switch closed). The +5V supply was on in both states. In the unit in question the voltage across the power switch (switch open) is low at only +0.75V (even though the PSU input connector still measures 3.84). So I am dropping approximately 3V somewhere on the MB. This is the case whether the CPU is installed or removed. Where should I look for the voltage loss? Is there a component(s) sharing this signal line? Where on the MB does this Power On signal go...CPU...RAM...etc? Any help would be appreciated.

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Re: No Power Up State


Posted on Aug 21, 2007

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Gateway dx4822-01 power supply

Gateway DX4822 Desktop PC,

Just a regular Ol' ATX power supply. Rated at a maximum wattage rating of 300 to 525 Watts. Two different power supply options offered.

Power Supply case size is;
6 Inches Wide, by 5-1/2 Inches Long, by 3-1/4 Inches Tall. (152.4mm Wide, by 139.7mm Long, by 82.55mm Tall )

Has the following power cables;

A) 1 -> 24-pin ATX main power cable,

[ NOTE* Color of connector on power cable, OR motherboard, does NOT matter.

Proper connector, proper power cable, DOES matter; connector color does not matter ]

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

{ Power to the motherboard, and all components connected to it }

C) 2 or more -> SATA power cables,

{ Power to a SATA harddrive, and/or power to SATA optical drive/s.
(CD/DVD drive) Or power for an upgrade in the future, for a SATA optical drive }

D) 3 or more -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

{ Power for an IDE (PATA) harddrive, or drives. Also power for IDE (PATA) optical drive/s. Plus power in some instances, for computer case fans }

E) Two or more Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables,

{ Listed as a Floppy Drive power cable. Back in the day when the article was written, such was true.
It can still be used for a Floppy Drive, but is more used now as a power cable for a;
1) Card Reader.
2) Computer case fans (IF needed }

It's name is Small 4-pin Peripheral power cable. It is smaller than it's larger cousin, the Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

Also has smaller gauge of wiring. This means it cannot carry the same amperage, as the standard 4-pin Peripheral power cable.

I would recommend this,

A) 1 -> 20 + 4-pin ATX main power cable.
Can be used as a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable, which is what you need.

B) 1 -> 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.

C) 6 -> SATA power cables

D) 4 -> Standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables

E) 1 -> Small 4-pin Peripheral power cables

F) 1 -> 6-pin PCI Express power cable

G) 1 -> 6/8-pin PCI Express power cable.

In the future, (Or now if you have one), you can upgrade to a better graphics card, that needs an additional power cable, IF you wish.
The 6-pin PCI Express power cable.

You also have a 6-pin or 8-pin PCI Express power cable.
(6/8-pin PCI Express power cable)

All the pins can be used together, and make an 8-pin PCI Express power cable, for a very powerful graphics card that requires this cable.

Just added bonuses with today's modern power supply's.

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Jul 04, 2012 | Gateway DX4822-01 Power Supply 575 Watt...

1 Answer

Atx motherboard wiring diagram

For the power cables from the Power Supply? Or Power Supply, and Front Panel header on the motherboard?

For both of these you need to state the computer manufacturer name, and Model Number.
Post back in a Comment.

If you just wish a generic, one-size-fits-all explanation;

A) 20 or 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The older computers use a 20-pin ATX main power cable. As computers needed more power to the motherboard, the 24-pin ATX main power cable was brought out,

Scroll the page down for info on the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

[ Much older motherboards (AT) used two main power cables. { In the link - Original PC main power cables} ]

B) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
Was brought out because Processors needed more power, than the 24-pin ATX main power cable feeding the motherboard, could deliver.

Power for the Processor,

C) 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable
Commonly misnomered as 'Molex'.

Molex was a model name given by the first manufacturer, of this design of power cable connector.
The name stuck. Kind of like referring to an adjustable open-end wrench as a Crescent wrench.

It is also referred to as a 4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable, because there are two styles of 4-pin Peripheral power cables.

4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable,

Generally used for IDE (PATA) harddrives, and IDE optical drives.

4-pin Small Peripheral power cable,

Older computers used it for power to the Floppy Drive. It's generally used now to provide power for a Card Reader.

Note that both types of connectors use the same power wires, and 2 ground wires.
Yellow is 12 Volts
Red is 5 Volts
Black is Ground

[ Also, in the ATX main power cable:
Orange is 3.3 Volts, the Green wire is the Soft Power On wire. Abbreviated as PS_ON.

Power Supply plugged into power, the Soft Power On wire is briefly touched to ANY Ground wire. This is bypassing the Power On switch.
If the computer (Power Supply) comes on, you have a bad Power On switch.
IF the computer (Power Supply) does NOT come on, you have a bad Power Supply ]

(ALL Black wires are Ground wires. They all lead back to one central Ground point.
ALL power wires lead back to one point in the power supply, for EACH power wire.

The 12 Volt power wires, (Yellow), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 12 Volt power rail.

The 5 Volt power wires, (Red), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 5 Volt power rail.

The 3.3 Volt power wires, (Orange), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 3.3 Volt power rail ]

D) SATA power cable
15-pin power cable for SATA harddrives, and SATA optical drives,

[ The smaller 7-pin SATA connector is the interface cable, or data cable.

IF, you have a SATA harddrive that has a provision for a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, ONLY use the SATA power cable.

It will burn out the harddrive if you use both. It may not do it right away, but eventually it will.
I have had people state over the years, that they were using both power cables. Came back two months later to tell me their harddrives had burned out ]

More to follow in a Comment.


Sep 30, 2011 | Motherboards

2 Answers

What is the best power supply for asus p4p800-vm or suetable power supply

A good brand P4 Power Supply (24-Pin) of 350-450 Watts is generally used and sufficient for it.

Hope it helps! Good Luck!

Apr 26, 2011 | ASUS P4P800-X Pentium Motherboard

1 Answer

My power supply went down, i put a new one in but it is a 20 pin the gigabyte is 24 pin,it fits but will not work, have i got to use a 24pin,i was told a 20 will work,i hoe u can help

Hi davids38,

I really recommend getting a 24-pin adapter Power Supply Unit (PSU). I had this problem once and did purchase a 24-pin adapter for my 20-pin PSU but my computer wasn't stable (random reboots and lock up). I purchased a 24-pin PSU and my computer worked fine ever since. Hope this helps.


Feb 22, 2011 | Gigabyte GA-8I915P Duo Pro Motherboard

1 Answer

No power. No lights. Dimension 8100. No response to the power button.

One of two things.
A) The Power Supply
B) the Motherboard.

The power supply is easy to troubleshoot. For little to nothing you should be able to take the power supply into a computer repair place and ask them to hook it up to a tester. It's real quick and simple. All they do is plug your 20 or 24 pin power cable that attaches to the motherboard to a box. It checks the power outputs of the power supply to let you know if any of the voltages are not present or way out of wack.

Jan 08, 2010 | Dell (S423) for Dimension 8100 (3F546)...

2 Answers

Upgrade a dell dimension 4500-p3 motherboard to a duo or quad motherboard

You can do this with case modification as well as a new psu as Dell used proprietary mb's, psu's & cases on this model Dimension. To tell you the truth it would probably be cheaper and easier to pick up a core2duo or quad barebones kit than trying to modify the Deimension. Just my opinion. Remember Dell psu's are not wired the same as industry standard and their motherboartds in these older units are not top quality. Hope this helps you out.

Jul 08, 2009 | Motherboards

2 Answers

When powering on the fans spin and yet I get no video. The LED under the PSU (CR9E1) flashes. What is the LED indicating?

This indicates power supply failure. PSU means Power Supply Unit.

Replace the power supply.
MAKE SURE it is a compatible one!

What do I mean by that statement? In some years of Dell manufacturing, Dell made their computers "Proprietary".
This means only Dell parts could be used in a Dell computer.

The wires in the 20/24-pin ATX main (Motherboard) power cable, were put in different socket holes, than a standard 20/24-pin main power cable.
Yellow is 12 volts. Orange is 3.3 volts. Red is 5 volts. Black wires are Ground wires.

If an aftermarket power supply made by another manufacturer, were to be used in these type of computers, it will burn out the motherboard! Possibly the ram memory and processor also!

If you buy an aftermarket power supply, instead of a Dell unit, make SURE the colors of the wires are in the same place, as they are in the Dell 20/24-pin main power cable connector!

For more info about that last statement, I suggest you check out this page,

Apr 02, 2009 | Dell (E210882) Motherboard

1 Answer

Trying to put a mother board together need help

Hi LadyT18,

Apparently your power supply is an ATX 20-pin type (v1.x) and is the standard a year or 2 back. Your motherboard being fairly recent uses the new standard which is ATX1 24-pin type (v2.x).

Your options are:
1. Replace your power supply with a higher wattage/XX pin;
2. You may still use the old 20-pin power supply provided that it is rated 300 watts or higher. Additionally, please bear in mind that using a 20-pin PSU to an ATX1 (24pin) may cause boot failure and/or instability during operation due to insufficient power delivery.

I scanned part of a motherboard's manual to illustrate how this could be done. Below is the image for your reference.


Hope this be of some help/idea. Pls post back how things turned up or should you need additional information.

Good luck and kind regards.

Nov 13, 2007 | Biostar : I945P-A7...

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