Question about Compaq Refurbished 280WATT POWER SUPPLY FOR PROFESSIONAL WORKSTATION 5100 Power Supply

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COMPAQ PS2033 280W POWER SUPPLY

Standby of 5 volts ok Note that the wire colors are different from standard on the ATX connetor. Did try connecting PIN 14 to ground with a cd rom attached to one of the standard 4 pin power connectors.

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I have seen 2 models ,one compatible ATX the other not,to figure how it turns on try with a lamp 12V 1W (like xmas tree lamp) first to gnd and later with 5v standby.

Posted on Sep 17, 2007

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How do i turn on a compaq ps-7231 power supply?


Pin Name Color
Description 1 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC 2 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC 3 COM Black Ground 4 5V Red +5 VDC 5 COM Black Ground 6 5V Red +5 VDC 7 COM Black Ground 8 PWR_OK Gray Power Ok is a status signal generated by the power supply to notify the computer that the DC operating voltages are within the ranges required for proper computer operation (+5 VDC when power is Ok) 9 5VSB Purple +5 VDC Standby Voltage (max 10mA, max 2A in ATX 2.2 spec) 10 12V Yellow +12 VDC 11 12V Yellow +12 VDC 12 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC 13 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC. ATX V2.3 / EPS12V V2.92 both define that the PSU has to use remote sensing to compensate cable drops on the 3.3V line. Because of this there is an additional brown cable crimped together with the orange cable either to pin 13 (ATX) or pin 1 (EPS12V). 14 -12V Blue -12 VDC 15 COM Black Ground 16 /PS_ON Green Power Supply On (active low). Short this pin to GND to switch power supply ON, disconnect from GND to switch OFF. 17 COM Black Ground 18 COM Black Ground 19 COM Black Ground 20 -5V White -5 VDC (this is optional on newer ATX-2 supplies, it is for use with older AT class expansion cards and can be omitted on newer units) 21 +5V Red +5 VDC 22 +5V Red +5 VDC 23 +5V Red +5 VDC 24 COM Black Ground /PSON activated by pressing and releasing the power button while the power supply is in standby mode. Activating /PSON connects the power supply's /PSON input to ground, thereby switching the power supply to full-on condition.

Feb 26, 2015 | Compaq Computers & Internet

2 Answers

My vostro 230 slim tower will not power on. I have replaced the power supply


The RAM modules may need reseating. After reseating and your computer still does not boot up then the RAM maybe faulty. Remove the RAM modules and take them to your friendlt computer shop and get them to test the RAM.

Mar 13, 2012 | Dell Vostro 230 Slim Tower PC Desktop

1 Answer

The local electricity supply went off and when power was restored the computer would not come back on again. What has happened?


Could have been a voltage spike. When the utility company turns the juice back on, there is a rush of power. This is needed to meet the power demands for all the users, who are on the line.

Problem is the voltage may be higher than what is needed, and a spike may occur. (Spike: Temporary voltage increase )

No sir. The utility company is not held responsible. (Yes, that bites!)

I have found that around 80 percent of the time, the problem is a bad Power On switch, or a bad Power Supply, when this occurs.

{The rest of the time the power went further than the Power Supply, and burned out the motherboard, Processor, Ram Memory, etc}

Power Supplies used in desktop computers, are generally a generic low quality unit.
Low quality Electrolytic Capacitors, Rectifier Bridge, MOSFET's, small gauge wiring, etc.

Couple that with some age on the Power Supply, and it doesn't take much to put it in an 'early grave'. (Plus being dirty inside)

I suggest you test to see if the problem is a $5 ATX power on switch, or the Power Supply.
I can only give you generic information, as the computer manufacturer name, and model number were not given.

(It's on the back of the computer tower next to the Windows product key, or up on the side/top of the tower, or behind a hinged panel in the front of the computer )

The test is to use a jumper wire, and bypass the Power On switch.
This has Nothing to do with the switch itself, however.

The main power cable coming from the Power Supply, and plugging into the motherboard, is either a 20-pin ATX main power cable, or a 24-pin ATX main power cable.
(Unless the desktop computer is Real old)

1) Basic example of a 20-pin ATX main power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

{NOTE* Color of connectors does Not matter }

2) Basic example of a 24-pin ATX power cable, and it's respective connector on the motherboard,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

(Same thing about color)

Here's the way it works when you press the Power On button, and the computer is plugged into power;

The Power Supply, when plugged into power, has a constant 5 Volt standby power present. (DC)

Pressing the Momentary Contact Switch of a Power On switch, momentarily routes the 5 volt power present in the Power Supply, back to another circuit in the Power Supply.

The Soft Power On circuit.
This small voltage 'excites' the Power Supply, and turns it on.
(No pun intended)

As stated, the Standby power is 5 Volts.
It is 5 Volts DC. In comparison two D cell flashlight batteries store 3 Volts DC.
Stated in case you are worried about electrical shock.

(The Power Supply in your computer is a SMPS.
Switched-Mode Power Supply.

It converts the AC power from your home, or business, into three main low DC voltages.
3.3 Volts, 5 Volts, and 12 Volts.

No matter if your country uses 100 Volts AC, or 120 Volts AC, or 220 Volts AC )

Look at either ATX main power cable. Note in the photo to the far right, the power cable is shown plugged into the motherboard. This is how it should be for the test.

Note also that the wires go in the BACK of the connector, and there is one Green wire.
This is the Soft Power On wire. (Can be abbreviated as PS_ON)

ALL of the Black wires you see are Ground wires.

The preferred jumper wire is a paper clip. It is straightened out, then bent into a U-shape.

The U is wrapped a few times, with black plastic electrical tape
for your fingers, and thumb to hold onto.

The 'legs' go down into the socket holes, in the BACK of the ATX power cable's connector.

The jumper 'legs' go down in the socket holes, RIGHT NEXT TO the existing wires already in the socket holes.

Right next to the GREEN wire, and ANY Black wire.

At the end of every wire going down into the back of the connector, (ATX main power cable connector) is a metal terminal.

This metal terminal is pretty far down in the socket hole. (1/2 inch?)
The jumper wire MUST touch the metal terminals.

The contact made is temporary. No longer than 2 seconds.
(Power Supply plugged into power)

IF, the Power Supply comes on, you have a bad Power On switch.

IF, the Power Supply does Not come on, you have a bad Power Supply.

The Power On switch, is located inside the plastic Power On button assembly.
It is an ATX Power On switch.

This is one example,

http://www.directron.com/atxswitch.html

The plastic of the Power On button assembly gets hard over time, and with constant heat from the computer.
The best method I have found, is to remove the Front Panel, and the Power On button assembly.

[ NOTE* Make notes as to which pins on the motherboard, in the Front panel header, the wires of the Power On switch go to.

I may Not have access to the Front Panel header pinout, to tell you where those wires went.

{The plastic front of your desktop computer is the Front Panel.
The area of pins on the motherboard, that the wires from the Front Panel go to, is the Front Panel header ]

I then use a hairdryer, or a bowl of very warm water, to soften the plastic.
(The ATX power on switch inside is going to be thrown away. Doesn't matter if it gets wet )

Then carefully ease the case of the Power On button assembly out, and ease the ATX power on switch out.

There MAY be a spark as you connect the jumper wire. Letting you know in advance. The tape is to protect your fingers.
You may feel safer using a glove on that hand.

The voltage however, is 5 Volts DC. As previously stated two D cell flashlight batteries store 3 Volts DC.

Would appreciate it if you would post back in a Comment, as to your findings.
With the computer manufacturer name, and model number, I may be able to show you direct information.

I can also help you decide on a Power Supply to buy, should it be the problem.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Feb 11, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Atx motherboard wiring diagram


For the power cables from the Power Supply? Or Power Supply, and Front Panel header on the motherboard?

For both of these you need to state the computer manufacturer name, and Model Number.
Post back in a Comment.


If you just wish a generic, one-size-fits-all explanation;

A) 20 or 24-pin ATX main power cable.

The older computers use a 20-pin ATX main power cable. As computers needed more power to the motherboard, the 24-pin ATX main power cable was brought out,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Scroll the page down for info on the 24-pin ATX main power cable.

[ Much older motherboards (AT) used two main power cables. { In the link - Original PC main power cables} ]


B) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable.
Was brought out because Processors needed more power, than the 24-pin ATX main power cable feeding the motherboard, could deliver.

Power for the Processor,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4


C) 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable
Commonly misnomered as 'Molex'.

Molex was a model name given by the first manufacturer, of this design of power cable connector.
The name stuck. Kind of like referring to an adjustable open-end wrench as a Crescent wrench.

It is also referred to as a 4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable, because there are two styles of 4-pin Peripheral power cables.

4-pin Standard Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

Generally used for IDE (PATA) harddrives, and IDE optical drives.


4-pin Small Peripheral power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#floppy

Older computers used it for power to the Floppy Drive. It's generally used now to provide power for a Card Reader.

Note that both types of connectors use the same power wires, and 2 ground wires.
Yellow is 12 Volts
Red is 5 Volts
Black is Ground

[ Also, in the ATX main power cable:
Orange is 3.3 Volts, the Green wire is the Soft Power On wire. Abbreviated as PS_ON.

Power Supply plugged into power, the Soft Power On wire is briefly touched to ANY Ground wire. This is bypassing the Power On switch.
If the computer (Power Supply) comes on, you have a bad Power On switch.
IF the computer (Power Supply) does NOT come on, you have a bad Power Supply ]

(ALL Black wires are Ground wires. They all lead back to one central Ground point.
ALL power wires lead back to one point in the power supply, for EACH power wire.

The 12 Volt power wires, (Yellow), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 12 Volt power rail.

The 5 Volt power wires, (Red), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 5 Volt power rail.

The 3.3 Volt power wires, (Orange), all lead back to one point in the Power Supply.
This is the 3.3 Volt power rail ]

D) SATA power cable
15-pin power cable for SATA harddrives, and SATA optical drives,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#sata

[ The smaller 7-pin SATA connector is the interface cable, or data cable.

IF, you have a SATA harddrive that has a provision for a SATA power cable, AND a 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable, ONLY use the SATA power cable.

It will burn out the harddrive if you use both. It may not do it right away, but eventually it will.
I have had people state over the years, that they were using both power cables. Came back two months later to tell me their harddrives had burned out ]

More to follow in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 30, 2011 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

The power supply came with no manual. There is no P IV power lead. There are two aux power leads. (1) four wire (O,B,R,Y) and (1) six wire lead (B,Y,B,Y,B,Y) The original power supply P IV lead has four...


As you've noted you need two Black wires (Ground), and two Yellow wires (12 Volt),
for a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

If you are not using the 6-pin PCI Express power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress

,rob the 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable connector, and wires from the old power supply.

Splice the wires of the 6-pin PCI Express to them.

Note:
Orange wires are 3.3 Volt
Red wires are 5 Volt
Yellow wires are 12 Volt
Black wires are Ground wires.

You need two Yellow wires, and two Black wires.


Or if you have a spare 4-pin standard Peripheral power cable from the power supply,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

,buy and use an adapter power cable.
Example,

http://www.directron.com/p4atx.html

Nov 27, 2010 | Coolmax Technology COOLMAX M500B 500W EPS...

1 Answer

I want to convert this power supply for use with a battery charger for model aircraft. I need to know the color codes for the wires and also the pinout and which wire is the power on.


Pin Name Color Description
1 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC
2 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC
3 COM Black Ground
4 5V Red +5 VDC
5 COM Black Ground
6 5V Red +5 VDC
7 COM Black Ground
8 PWR_OK Gray Power Ok (is a status signal generated by the power supply to notify the computer that the DC operating voltages are within the ranges required for proper computer operation)
9 5VSB Purple +5 VDC Standby Voltage (max 10mA)
10 12V Yellow +12 VDC
11 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC
12 -12V Blue -12 VDC
13 COM Black Ground
14 /PS_ON Green Power Supply On (active low). Short this pin to GND to switch power supply ON, disconnect from GND to switch OFF.
15 COM Black Ground
16 COM Black Ground
17 COM Black Ground
18 -5V White -5 VDC
19 5V Red +5 VDC
20 5V Red +5 VDC

/PSON activated by pressing and releasing the power button while the power supply is in standby mode. Activating /PSON connects the power supply's /PSON input to ground, thereby switching the power supply to full-on condition.
18 AWG is recommended for all wires except pin 11, which should be 22 AWG. For 300W configurations 16 AWG is recommended.
There are several ATX variants.
Hope this helps.
If this helps you resolve your problem, please
consider giving me a rating of 4.It will help me as well. Thank you.

Nov 26, 2010 | Compaq (243890-001) 250-Watt Power Supply

1 Answer

I am looking at a Dell Dimension 4550 PC for a friend and it won't boot up...i push the power button on and there is an almost orange/greenish light on the power button... no beeps no diagnostic lights are...


Bad Power Supply. Weak voltage power rail.

[There are three main voltages produced by the Dimension 4550's Power Supply.
1) 3.3 Volts
2) 5 Volts
3) 12 Volts ]

The Power On button LED functions as a diagnostic light also.

Dell Support > Dimension 4550 > Service Manual,

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim4550/

Left-click on Solving Problems, then click on Power Problems

The Power Supply is just an ATX form factor version. The common Power Supply form factor used in MANY desktop computers.
(ATX form factor for a Power Supply refers to the size, and shape of the Power Supply's case.
Approximately 6 inches Wide, 5.5 inches Long, and 3-1/2 inches Tall)

HOWEVER, (Not shouting), there is an area of concern, should you try a Power Supply you may have available for a test, or purchase one.

It involves the wiring of the 20-pin ATX main power cable. More specifically the power cable's connector.

To explain view the standard wiring, set for a 20-pin ATX main power cable's connector,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

Looking at the photo to the far right, observe the color code of the wires, going down into the socket holes of the connector.

Look at the Lock tab on the side of the connector. This will help you orient the color code of the wires, and their placement in the socket holes, to the chart below the photos.

The connector on the end of the 20-pin ATX main power cable, is a Male connector.
Where the wires go into the connector, is the Back of the connector.
In the middle photo you can see the Front of the connector.

The wires going down into the ATX main power cable's connector, end in a female metal terminal.
The connector on the motherboard, (Shown in the photo to the Left), has Pins.
The metal female terminals go over the Pins.

The pins are numbered. The color code of the wires match up to the pins.
This is shown in the chart.

Now look at Dell Support > Dimension 4550 > Technical Overview > DC Power Connectors >
DC Power Connector P1

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/dim4550/techov.htm#1101897

The illustration may not be accurate. You'll have to compare since you have the computer, and Power Supply in front of you.

For a time period Dell was a Proprietary manufacturer.
Meaning they wanted THEIR parts used on THEIR computers, and ONLY THEIR parts.
They had the motherboard manufacturers make motherboards according to their specs.

One of the specifications was that the pins would be CHANGED around, in the motherboard connector for the ATX main power cable.

They also had Power Supply manufacturers make the ATX power cable to their specifications.

This means if a user bought an aftermarket Power Supply, the color code of the wires in the ATX main power cable would Not match.

Many users did buy an aftermarket Power Supply, and installed it.
Burnt motherboards, fried Processors, and graphics cards, resulted.

Orange wires are 3.3 Volts
Red wires are 5 Volts
Yellow wires are 12 Volts.
Black wires are Ground wires.

Guess what happens when you plug a 12 Volt wire into where a 3.3 Volt, or 5 Volt, or Ground wire is supposed to Be?
POOF!

My suggestion would be to look for a Power Supply that is an ATX form factor, is KNOWN to be good, and is compatible, for a test unit.
You, or someone you know may have upgraded to a better computer, and you may be able to borrow the Power Supply for a test unit.

Compatible:
Has the Correct power cables.
1) 20-pin ATX main power cable, OR a 20/24-pin ATX main power cable.
(20-pin connector that has an additional connector with 4 pins. Just use the 20-pin)

2) 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. (Also referred to as P4 MB, and P4 ATX 12V)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

(Power for the Processor)

3) Enough standard 4-pin Peripheral power cables.
(Misnomered as Molex)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#peripheral

(Power for the IDE Harddrive, and Optical drive/s)

Also:
You can change the power wires around in the ATX main power cable's connector.
Change them around, in an aftermarket Power Supply's ATX main power cable's connector.

Want to know how post in a Comment.

Oct 09, 2010 | Dell Dimension 4550 PC Desktop

4 Answers

Conections


Hi peju90,

If you've gutted out the old dell computer, then your only talking about a empty case. Put all the right chips and cpu's that the Asus board requires, and you should have no problem with the CD rom or any other hardware. Except if you try and put the hard disk from the dell, it will not have the same configurations, and probably be a bit crazy. But, reformat the drive to it's new board, and your home free.

The power connections will be the same as it was on the old Presario, if you have the old power supply then nothing changes on that. You'll need to hook up the front connectors for USB and Hard drive lights, reset etc, but that would be the ugliest senario. Meaning the csse fit a special connector that the board doesn't carry. In that case you to option, either cut the special connectors and replace them with the ones from the old Presario case, or don't connect them, all but the power, you're gonna need that hooked up, one way or the other.

But, that's as tough as it gets my friend. A case is a case is a case.

Good Luck

Mark

Oct 17, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Compaq dead after power company shutdown period


Sounds like a blown fuse in the psu, replace the unit and you should be good to go.

Nov 30, 2008 | HP ATX-250-12Z, ATX-250-12Z Rev. H1, HP...

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