Question about Foxconn NF4UK8AA-8EKRS Motherboard

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Changing Multiplier I want to lower my multiplier so that i can increase my fbs by more. But this option is not available in BIOS and i have flashed it and got the latest version. Any input of how to do this other wise is appreciated.

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This may be harder than you think. Odds are your processor has a locked clock multiplier. Since this is most likely the case you're going to need to find a way to unlock it. Unlocking some processors are easier to do than others, but it's not going to be simple pretty much across the board. FYI, years ago most processors weren't locked in any way, this was before the big tech boom and the huge expansion of the computer building market. The big 2 started locking multipliers when anyone with an internet connection thought they could build and overclock computers and would raise the multiplier up way to high and burn up their cpu. These same people would then demand a replacement. The overclocking scene is why we have locks on them now. As a general rule of thumb mobile processors usually come with an unlocked multiplier, but that is not always the case either. Ok, all this being said... IF you have a processor with an unlocked multiplier AND you are using an AMD based processor you can download a program called central brain identifier. Under the mobility section there is an option to change the multiplier on the fly right inside of windows. Now having said all this, I would recommend not raising the clock multiplier, you're better off raising the front side bus and tweaking settings like ram latency. If your system is having issues running at a higher FSB try tuning your cpu and ram voltage. Go in the smallest increments your motherboard will allow, do your cpu first. Raise the voltage by 1 notch and then try going to a higher FSB than you can safely use, if you still experience issues try going up another notch. Please Please Please use your head. Overclocking is not always safe, and your system WILL fail if you push it too far past it's limit. You must keep in mind that your processor was built to run at a specific multiplier, running at a higher one may simply not work at all, or lead to system instability or worse. Don't buy into the hype either that "______ processor is the same as the higher model ______ processor, they just set the multiplier different". While this is technically true the way it works is all the chips are built and then tested at various speeds, the ones that pass all the tests are shipped as the highest end units, the ones that cannot run at the highest multiplier but can run without trouble at a lower one get set to be sold as the lower model. So as you could imagine this can lead to trouble when you're dealing with people changing the clock multiplier to a different one. If you have any further questions please e-mail me directly pctservices@aim.com

Posted on Aug 15, 2007

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I cant overclock my system but i go to bios now whati had to do


The BIOS. Overclocking is best done in the computer's BIOS (Basic Input/Output System or Binary Integrated Operating System). There are also some motherboards that let you do a basic increase in power by setting a jumper, but this is dangerous and you have no real stability control.


There are some software programs available which allow you to overclock inside the operating system, but the best results are achieved by changing BIOS settings. Usually you can get into your BIOS by pressing DEL (some systems may use F2, F10, or Ctrl-Enter) as soon as your computer begins the POST

(Power On Self Test - when it shows the RAM size, processor speed, etc.).


Here, you can change your FSB (front side bus), memory timings, and your CPU multiplier (also referred to as CPU Clock Ratio).

Clearing your CMOS. Sometimes, an overclock can become unstable. If this happens, or your computer will not boot, you will need to reset the BIOS back to default and start over again.


This is done by clearing the CMOS (a small piece of memory on the motherboard which stores your BIOS configuration, and is powered by a small battery). Some newer motherboards will bypass user settings in the CMOS if the computer fails POST (often caused by a faulty overclock). However, most motherboards require a manual clear.


This can be done in two ways, depending on your motherboard. The first way is by changing the position of the clear CMOS jumper on your motherboard, waiting a few minutes, then repositioning the jumper to its original place.


The CMOS Jumper

The second way, if your motherboard doesn't have this jumper, consists of unplugging your computer, removing the little CMOS battery, then pressing the power button (your capacitors will discharge), and waiting a couple of minutes.


Then you have to refit the battery and plug in your computer. Once your CMOS is cleared, all BIOS settings are reset back to default and you'll have to start the overclocking process all over again. Just so you know, this step is only necessary if your overclock becomes unstable.


Locked or Unlocked. The first thing to know when you start the process of overclocking, is whether your processor is multiplier locked or unlocked.

To check whether your CPU is locked, lower your multiplier via the BIOS one step, for example from 11 to 10.5. Save and exit your BIOS and your computer will restart.


If your computer posts again and shows the new CPU speed, it means your CPU is unlocked. However, if your computer failed to post (screen remains black) or no CPU speed change is present, this means your multiplier is locked


Multiplier Unlocked Processors. Usually, your max overclock is limited by your memory, or RAM. A good starting place is to find the top memory bus speed in which your memory can handle while keeping it in sync with the FSB. To check this, lower your CPU multiplier some steps (from 11 to 9, for example) and increase your FSB a few notches (e.g.: 200 MHz to 205 MHz).


After this, save and exit your BIOS. There are a few ways to test for stability.

If you make it into Windows, that is a good start. You can try running a few CPU / RAM intensive programs to stress these components. Some good examples are SiSoft Sandra, Prime95, Orthos, 3DMark 2006 and Folding@Home.


You may also choose to run a program outside of Windows, such as Memtest. Load a copy of Memtest onto a bootable floppy, then insert the disk after you have exited the BIOS.

Continue to increase your FSB until Memtest starts reporting errors. When this happens, you can try to increase the voltage supplied to your memory.


Do note that increasing voltages may shorten the life span of your memory. Also, another option is to loosen the timings on the memory (more on this a bit later). The previous FSB setting before the error will be your max FSB. Your max FSB will fully depend on what memory you have installed. Quality, name-brand memory will work best for overclocking.


Now that you know your max FSB, you'll figure out your max multiplier. Keeping your FSB @ stock, you raise your multiplier one step at a time. Each time you restart, check for system stability. As mentioned above, one good way to do this is by running Prime95.


If it doesn't post (reread the section about clearing the CMOS), or Prime 95 fails, you can try to raise the core voltage a bit. Increasing it may or may not increase stability. On the other hand, the temperature will also be increased. If you are going to increase the core voltage, you should keep an eye on temperatures, at least for a few minutes.


Also note that increasing voltages may shorten the life span of your CPU, not to mention void your warranty. When your computer is no longer stable at a given multiplier setting, lower your multiplier one step and take that as your max multiplier.


Now that you have your max FSB speed and your max multiplier, you can play around and determine the best settings for your system. Do note that having a higher FSB overclock as opposed to a higher multiplier will have a greater impact on overall system performance.


http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=107977


hope this helps

May 30, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Overclocking aopenax4b-533 mobo


In some motherboards, you can increase the multiplier, which will increase your processor speed.(Briefly, Processor Speed = FSB x Multiplier) You can also increase the chipset, memory, and CPU voltage, which will sometimes allow you to have a higher FSB. There are other settings such as PCI Bus and AGP Bus, you generally don't want to touch those, either they might put risk to your PC, or that they won't make much difference in performance. Be careful when you overclock because you can really damage your computer that way.

Mar 08, 2010 | AOpen Computers & Internet

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My processor is rated at 3000 but is only running


What you are trying to do is called overclocking, and there are some excellent guides for that on the internet, like here: http://www.compunamics.com/overclocking.htm
I suggest you read this before proceeding the overclocking.
You can open the BIOS (press a key like F1, F2, F8 or del during startup). Somewhere there will be a menu with options for voltages and frequencies (units in V and MHz)
As you have read, processor speed depends on the multiplier and front side bus speed: CPU Multiplier x FSB = CPU frequency.
Right now, your frequency is 2200 MHz (presumably 11 x 200)
To get it to 3000 MHz (3GHz), you either have to raise the option called FSB in the BIOS to 270 (270 x 11 = 2970), or increase the multiplier to 15 (200 x 15 = 3000). Before you do so, write both the values down, so that you can reset to them, in case things go wrong.
I sugest first trying to raise the multiplier from 11 to 15. It may however, be locked at 11. If you can get it to 15, you're done, your CPU is now running at 3 GHz.
If not, you'll have to go through some more trouble.

First, you'll need to find your memory (or RAM, or DDR) multiplier and frequency, in the same menu as the FSB and CPU multiplier. Write them down as well.
As you have also read, increasing the FSB will make your CPU and memory go faster. This may however, be too much for the RAM to handle.
With the FSB frequency and multiplier, you can calculate the frequency of your RAM just as with the processor.
You will now have to change FSB from 200 to 270, so you'll also have to calculate a new RAM multiplier, if you want the RAM to run at the same speed.
For example, your RAM frequency can be 200 (FSB) x 2 (multiplier) = 400. If you then increase FSB to 270, your RAM will run at 300 x 2 = 600. You will have to lower the multiplier to get as close to 400 as you can get, and preferably lower, if 400 cannot be achieved.
Having done this, you can slowly start to increase FSB, I would suggest by 10 at a time. As soon as the PC has trouble starting, in the BIOS, increase the CPU voltage by one step, until it runs stable again. However, as your CPU is rated at 3GHz, you shouldn't have any trouble with this,and should not have to increase voltages.

If you encounter any probems, let me know!

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How to get AMD athlon 3700 socket 754 engineering sample cpu run at proper speed


Here's a little history
http://compreviews.about.com/cs/pchardwarebasics/a/aaBIOS.htm

More advanced stuff
http://compreviews.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?zi=1/XJ&sdn=compreviews&cdn=compute&tm=128&gps=215_11_1267_540&f=00&su=p284.9.336.ip_p504.1.336.ip_&tt=2&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//www.adriansrojakpot.com/Speed_Demonz/BIOS_Guide/BIOS_Guide_Index.htm

Some systems have "bottlenecks," where small overclocking of a component can help realize the full potential of another component to a greater percentage than the limiting hardware is overclocked. For instance, many motherboards with AMD Athlon 64 processors limit the speed of four units of RAM to 333 MHz. However, the memory speed is computed by dividing the processor speed (which is a base number times a CPU multiplier, for instance 1.8 GHz is most likely 9x200 MHz) by a fixed integer such that, at stock speeds, the RAM would run at a clock rate near 333 MHz. Manipulating elements of how the processor speed is set (usually lowering the multiplier), one can often overclock the processor a small amount, around 100-200 MHz (less than 10%), and gain a RAM clock rate of 400 MHz (20% increase), releasing the full potential of the RAM.

AMD also produced x86 designs which competed with Intel on performance rather than price. In January 2002 the Pentium 4 gained a lead in sales and AMD marketing responded by giving their processors numeric suffixes approximating the clock rate that an AMD Thunderbird (and by inference a Pentium processor) would need to give matching performance, openly undermining the "megahertz myth".

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2 Answers

Defective sony/intel cpu?


Sony tech support, refused 2 show me how 2 reset the multiplier.apparently their firmware has a multiplier of 6x locked in.nowhere in the bios/cmos can it be changed.intel says its suppose to be a 9x multiplier 2 achieve the 1500mhz.why would sony throttle down a 1.5ghz rig to 997mhz?they cpu must be defective & to stop it from blowing up on people they set the multiplier @ 6x.ok fine but don’t advertise it as a 1500mhz rig & make consumers think that’s the speed they’ll b getting.how many other u.s.citizens r unaware that they’ve been swindled/cheated/misled?what about a recall? What about some legal action against them?i’ve spent hours & hours e-mailing them & making phonecalls & they’re intent on acting as if they’ve done nothing wrong.

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1 Answer

MULTIPLIER SET @ 6X INSTEAD OF 9X?


Ok first of all can I have the model of the unit? secondly usually when you first boot up the computer you can hit delete to enter the bios setup. Now unfortunately you have to hope that the multiplier is in the bios. Sometimes it is a jumper located on the actual motherboard. Once I get your model number I can assist you further. Try that first once in the bios look around to see what you can find. Also you can change it in power management in control panel. But they are probably correct most laptops do bump up the speed automatically. This helps to conserve power. Which you would want with your laptop.
Hope this helps.
Thanks,
Lee

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2 Answers

SOYO SY-7VBA133U cannot adjust CPU speed


Flashing the bios is the best idea to start with. This will upgrade to the newest bios, which normally adds more features and fixes some bugs.

There is a small chance that this motherboard just doesn't support overclocking, but the majority of them do.

Below is the link to soyo's site and downloads for your model number. There was 4 or 5 bios updates. I would get the newest one.

http://www.soyo.com/content/Downloads/155/&c=28&p=48&l=English

Hope this helps

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1 Answer

Overclocking


First off... be warned overclocking is not for the faint of heart... now let us begin...

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE ADEQUATE COOLING!!!!

I can't stress this out enough if you plan on overcloking it's worth spending some money on some fan's specifically a CPU fan to make sure it stays cool. A side effect of overclocking is increased heat.

Restart the computer and go into your BIOS. Look for the setting to change the bus speed. Depending on your specific CPU it should be 200 MHz (if it's not don't worry, most computers now are 200 MHz). There should also be an option called the multiplier. This one is usually unavailable. If it is available you have a high-end CPU model that is "unlocked".

THEORY:

The system bus is multiplied by the multiplier and gives you the resulting speed.

200 x 16 = 3200 => 3.2 GHz

IF your multiplier is unlocked you can increase it... it's not then we have to use the system bus.

When you change the system bus it increases the speed of everything in your system... that is the link in between  individual components. But it's a double edge sword... it will cause you system to become unstable more quickly and reduce the maximum overclocking potential.

PRACTICE:

Increase the bus speed 3~5 MHz at a time. Restart the computer boot into the Operating System and run applications you normally would. If nothing crashes, hangs, freezes, locks up... you can reboot the computer and increase the bus speed again. Repeat theses steps until:

a) reach a point where the system becomes unstable
b) you feel like pushing your system more is getting to risky


This is a very basic answer on how to overclock. For more information, guides and other goodies http://www.extremeoverclocking.com/ is a good website for more information and guides.

WARNING: If you push the system to far to fast without doing it gradually you can surpass the computer components limits and cause damage to the computer parts. I am not responsible for any damage that occurs. This is just a guide.

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2 Answers

Athlon 2800+ XP-M runs at 606 MHz


1. Check your battery, 2. Press CTRL+F1 or ALT+F1 while you are in the BIOS. 3. Update your BIOS Microcode and CPU Code.

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