Question about Barska Optics Barska 8x32 1.3 MP Digicam Camera Binoculars

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Poor quality images from digital camera

Focus of binoculars is fine but images taken with digital camera is very poor, completly out of focus, even using a tripod to steady the setup will not help. Norm

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SOURCE: After several years use without

I fear these have suffered damage without your knowledge. The collimation has gone bad, hence the two images instead of one. As the left side doesn't focus properly, I would guess that one of the prisms in that side has shifted position, which would account for both defects. This can be fixed by a skilled and knowledgable person, or made worse by someone who does not know what they are doing, but in the end, it may be too expensive to have them put right by an expert, as very good binoculars are available quite cheaply today.

Posted on Nov 16, 2010

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I have a pair of pentax 10x42 DCF HRc binoculars that will not focus properly througn the right eyepiece. Just wondering if this is a common problem and is it worhtwhile getting repaired

The binos will rack focus both at the same distance, you need to rack focus left side to distant image with left eye only, then turn diopter focus to focus right eyepiece. Diopter focus is thinner wheel behind focus wheel

Aug 15, 2015 | Pentax DCF HRc (10x42) Binocular

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go

thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
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It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

2 Answers

I bought the 10x25 camera binoculars and only one lens will focus using the center dial. Its almost like the other one needs to be focused at the eye piece itself. The pictures are not clear and are...

It is common for binoculars to have one independently focusable eyepiece.  If one eyepiece can be rotated, then that is the case.
If that is the case, focus through the one that DOES NOT rotate using the center control until you get a sharp image on that side.  Then rotate the eyepiece on the blurry side until the blurry side is sharp.  If you succeed at this, from henceforth the center control will focus both eyes adequately

Aug 11, 2010 | Sharper Image Binoculars & Monoculars

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Seeing double when I look with both eyes. Out of

Step 1.
Adjust the eyepiece or both if both are adjustable back to zero. It should be printed on there. If it's not, then halfway. To find halfway turn them to one end, count the number of turns like 1 and a half turns for example, and then half that atnd turn it that ammount. You've now reset the binoculars to zero.

Step 2.
Now to focus. Pick your target that you want to look at thoguh your binoculars. Look through the binoculars and close the eye with the adjustable eyepiece or your right eye if both are eadjustable and focus the image on the left eye with the central focus knob. Once you've got it focused close the left eye, open the right eye and if it's not in focus adjust the EYEPIECE focus, not the central one, until it's in focus.
If you can't get it in focus because the eyepiece focus won't turn far enough in one direction, turn the OTHER eyepiece in the opposite direction at max, start the process again from step 2.

If it's all ok now you need to adjust the distance between the eyepieces. Open the binoculars as far as they go, look through the binoculars with both eyes on the target and move the binoculars inward slowly until you remove any black edges around the image, then move them very slowly inward until you see only one image.

If you've got more problems come back as ask. :-)

Nov 27, 2009 | Vector Audubon 8x42 Binoculars

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I bought these for my husband. In trying them

Difficult to answer specifically without knowing the model. But binoculars are designed to view objects in the distance. They all have a limit as to how close they will focus based on the magnification and design. Objective lenses that are far apart such as on a porro prism binocular will not focus very close. The nature of the design of having the objectives further apart than the eyepieces doesn't allow it. When trying to focus too close the image will appear blurred and double. That is the nature of the design. 9 feet or 3 metres is considered quite close to focus a binocular and is usually for a model designed to do this such as a roof prism where the objective lens and the eye lenses are inline. A specialty binocular such as the Pentax Papilo will close focus to 50 centimeters. It has been designed so that the objective (large lenses) lenses converge.

Take into account when focusing that binoculars are also designed to compensate for differences in each eye. One of the eyepieces either right or left will adjust seperately. For binoculars with a center focus ring. First focus using the center ring with one eye covered. The eye that should be covered is the one that doesn't have the adjusting eyepiece. When the image is clear close the eye you have just used and leave the center focus alone. Focusing on the same spot look through the eyepiece that adjusts and turn the eyepiece ring until the image is clear. Now all you have to do is focus using the center ring only as the binoculars are adjusted for each eye.

Some binoculars do not have a center focus and each eye will adjust seperately.

Jul 29, 2009 | Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

See two images at higher power.

Your binoculars are out of collimation. That means that the optical path needs to be aligned. Binoculars are designed so that the focus point of each barrel is the same over long and as short as possible distances. Binoculars that are properly aligned will still show a double image if you attempt to focus at something close that is too close for the models design. However this is not the same for long distances. The image at a long distance must not be doubled.

If they are under warranty and you haven't damaged them by dropping etc send them for repair to the manufacturer or ask the retailer where to send them.

If you are going to pay to have them fixed get a quote first. Binoculars that are of the zoom variety are not well thought of among binocular officionados as the quality of image degrades at higher magnification. For the price of repair you may be able to source a higher quality non zoom binocular.

Jul 20, 2009 | Sharper Image Spion (AR001)

2 Answers

How to focus my Zeiss 10x40B TP binoculars

Your binoculars are known as the Zeiss Classic or what was once known as the Dialyt. They focus differently from the usual binoculars like those mentioned. The rear wheel is to focus both binocular barrels while using them. The front focus wheel is adjust the right eyepiece to suit your right eye. Binocular manufacturers take into account each eye is slightly different. To focus the Dialyt...First close your right eye and turn the rear wheel until the image is sharp in the left barrel. Leave the focus wheel alone. Now close left eye and adjust the front wheel until the image is sharp for your right eye. The image should now be clear and in focus for both eyes. It should not be needed to use the front wheel from now on. The rear wheel is what you will use to change the focus from near to far objects.

May 31, 2009 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

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Poor quality

My response to these always makes me sad. There is no way of getting good picture. These camera binoculars are neither good cameras or binoculars. They do neither well. The camera is just attached to the binoculars. What you see through the binoculars is not what the camera sees. The binoculars magnification is not the same as the lens in the camera. It is like holding a camera on top of a pair of binoculars. The camera will take a picture in the area approximate to where you are looking. Digital cameras have a sensor. The more megapixels the larger the sensor should be. Camera makers are now making compact cameras with huge megapixel capacity without increasing the sensor size. The result is worse looking pictures. Not much is different with the cameras attached to binoculars only the sensors are much worse quality than those on a stand alone digital camera.
Maybe not the solution you wanted buts its the truth. If you do want to take bird photos your best bet is a pair of binoculars on a tripod with a digital camera adaptor and camera attached. The camera adaptors that are made in China are not expensive and are copies of some of the high priced units out there. all the adaptor is is a bracket which attaches to a tripod which holds the camera to one of the binocular lenses. That way you see what the camera sees through the binoculars.

Dec 30, 2008 | Vivitar MAGNACAM Binocular

9 Answers

Pictures dont come out clear when uploading to computer

Binoculars capture an excellent view, but the pictures I download stink. Has anyone been able to get quality pictures using this product?

Dec 21, 2007 | Vivitar MAGNACAM Binocular

1 Answer

Image Quality

look for a tiny pinhole and insert a pin while powered up to reset the device or because of environment, your device may have been designed with a switch combination to force a reset. start trying different switch hold-downs while powering up

May 27, 2007 | Bushnell ImageView 11-8200 Binocular

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