Question about Bushnell NorthStar 78-8890 (300 x 90mm) Telescope

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Aiming with the computer

When ever I use the computer to tell me where a star is. It always seems to point me to an area with little or no stars. and yes every time I use the telescope I reset the time and date and area. However Im not sure if Im setting the star correctly. Can someoe tell me how to set the star or how to fix this problem?

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Re: Aiming with the computer

I hav the exact same problem with my bushnell 100 mm makstovut cassgrain check my problem and see if the solution for it works cuz for me it isn't right now.

Posted on Aug 11, 2007

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What am I doing wrong with my star alignment process? Please help.

I don't know your scope in detail, but if you can read this you should be able to go to the user manual here

There are a few things common to these goto hand controls.
- you must enter the time and date accurately, and be correct about daylight saving settings, and observe the date format
- you most likely will have to go through time and date setting steps each time, but the control will probably remember one of these at least. You will see what it has already set when you come to that step next time around.
- the mount should be leveled as far as possible, or pointing errors will appear when the scope slews around.
It could be that the scope has no idea at all where the align star is, when using Earth Align. You are teaching it that, but if the rough location it tries to reach is way way off, it seems you need a second star and Align Star mode. Often with these devices you need one star from either side of the meridian.
You could also start again with a different city, but one in the opposite direction to the first. I would try cities all around the compass to see if one gives a better result.

Apr 08, 2012 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8846 (675 x 114mm)...

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When I have my 8mm or 4 mm all I see is black. any suggestions? with the naked eye I can see stars and with the aiming scope I see them but through main eyepiece I see nothing.

The finder scope must be aligned with the main tube. Get a bright star into the MAIN tube eyepiece. Then without moving the scope adjust the crosshairs in the small finder scope so they CROSS at the same star.

Mar 27, 2011 | Vivitar Telescopes

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Stars are always JUST points of light with or without a telescope. They are too far away to see a disk.

Try to find Jupiter a bright "star" in the WEST after dark.

And also the Orion Nebula- M42.

Download this free monthly star chart:

and read my TIPS on my profile page

Feb 05, 2011 | Telescopes

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Telescope is definitely assembled correct but fail to see any magnification of light thru tube with use of either lens. Very clear nite but little moonlight, does that matter? Seems we get no magnification...

Did you try this during the day time. Stars are always just points of light no matter what telescope you use.

Try for the moon and or Jupiter which is up in the sky right now after dark. It looks like a BRIGHT star.

Dec 27, 2010 | Vivitar (1607225) Telescope

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When I look at he stars through the telescope it looks no "bigger" than looking at the stars with the naked eye.

That's absolutely correct. Stars are so incredibly distant that they are effectively point light sources. Except for the largest telescopes ever built and those orbiting in space there are no telescopes which make stars seem bigger. But they will resolve what appears to be a single star into binaries, for example. Larger telescopes also gather far more light than the human eye, so will show objects which are far too faint to be seen with the naked eye.

Higher magnification eyepieces are mostly used for lunar and planetary observation, but the more magnified the image, the less bright it is. High magnifications also show up any optical flaws in the objective lens and atmospheric interference, so it's always best to use the lowest magnification which allows you to see the detail you're after.

Oct 03, 2010 | Galileo Telescopes

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When viewing venus or other stars there a black spot in the center of the object. It appears to be the 2nd mirror refleting to the main miror. what have I done incorrect?

You are NOT in focus. Turn the focus knob a little until you see a perfect "disk" for the planet. Stars are always POINTS of light, with a telescope or without a telescope.

Aug 28, 2010 | Celestron NexStar 114GT (269 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Meade LX200GPS The scope does not complete the 'Auto Alignment'

Once the scope has taken a GPS fix and knows TIME, and SITE, and you do a two star alignment your alignment stars overide any automatic alignment issues.

You could turn off the GPS put in Time, Date, and Site, do a two star alignment and everything would be fine. Centering the alignment stars is the "trick". Apparently the scope also finds NORTH OK, or the alignment stars would be way off. Since you pre-level the tripod already the software can FAIL on "tilt" and you still get good gotos.

I would not worry about it, especially since your gotos seem perfectly fine.

May 28, 2010 | Meade LX200GPS Telescope

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Does the eyepiece have to be a in the slot a certain amount? Cant figure out why the stars are just little lights. I thought you were suppose to be able to view things in detail?

The stars are ALWAYS points of light. They are hundreds or thousands of light years away.

Download a free star chart at

Try to locate several of the M objects listed on the chart also look at the moon and the planets.

This may help you:

Dec 20, 2009 | Meade DS-2114 ATS (325 x 114mm) Telescope

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How does a telescope used, and can we see a star through it even if the star is really really far?

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope. Go outside during the day and practice focusing on a distant object.

Stars ALWAYS look like -------------- stars no matter what telescope you use. They are all too far away to see as a "disk" , always just points of light.

The closest star is Proxima Centauri at 4.2 light years away.

That is about 25 TRILLION miles!

Oct 30, 2009 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

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Tasco galaxsee

Nothing------ stars are always JUST STARS no matter what scope you are using. They are too far away to see a disk. Point this scope at Jupiter, Saturn, Venus, Mars-- or other star clusters and the moon.

Remember stars are always just points of light-------- using Google look up the "Messier Objects"--- there are 110 of them in the night sky at different times of the year.

Dec 10, 2007 | Telescopes

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