Question about Troy-Bilt 12AVB29Q711 TB260 21-Inch 160cc Honda GCV160 Gas Powered 3-In-1 FWD Self Propelled Lawn Mower With High Rear Wheels

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How do you increase the engine speed - Troy-Bilt 12AVB29Q711 TB260 21-Inch 160cc Honda GCV160 Gas Powered 3-In-1 FWD Self Propelled Lawn Mower With High Rear Wheels

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HOW TO SWITCH 6260 TO 60HZ


6260 isn't a model number for any Ingersoll Rand generator.

Generally, though, if you have a generator that generates 50Hz and you want it to produce 60Hz instead, you adjust the governor to increase engine running speed by 20%... if the engine will tolerate that speed. The first thing you need to do is find out what speed the engine runs when it's under normal load. If that speed can't safely be increased 20%, then the generator head has been built strictly for 50Hz and there's nothing you can do about it except run a UPS between the generator and your load.

If the engine speed IS low enough to safely increase by 20%, then that's what you do.

Jul 03, 2014 | Ingersoll Rand Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

Car surging


Is the car equipped with the Automatic Transmission?
If so, read on.
Otherwise skip to the end and answer some questions.

POSSIBLE SCENARIO:
I have observed a condition where my car surges slightly when the torque-converter clutch (TCC) cycles between lock and unlock when driving on an uphill grade.
First some basics and history that will explain why the TCC is used.

Engine, Torque Converter, TCC, and Transmission relationship--
The TCC allows for a solid connection between the engine and transmission which allows the input to the transmission to rotate at the same speed as the engine.
Without a TCC, there is slippage between the engine and automatic transmission. The slippage is greatest at low engine RPM. That is what allows the engine to run with the automatic transmission in gear, like when you first shift into gear or stop at a stop sign. When the throttle pedal is depressed, the engine RPM begins to increase and the torque converter begins to slip less and less the more the engine RPM increases. The car moves. But even at cruising speeds the torque converter slips slightly. Engine RPM is greater than transmission input RPM, which is realized as slight decrease in fuel efficiency.
When acceleration is complete and a constant speed is being maintained, the engine power output is reduced to the point where the TCC can engage and eliminate any slippage between the engine and transmission. If the car has a tachometer the engagement of the TCC can be verified when a slight reduction in engine RPM observed without a corresponding change in vehicle speed.
One method used to test the operation of the TCC is as follows:
Find a flat section of road where it is safe to perform the test.
Reach a steady speed and keep the gas pedal depressed with one foot. While observing the tachometer (or listening for an increase in engine RPM), with the other foot depress the brake pedal enough to activate the break light switch but not enough to engage the brakes. When the brake light switch activates, the TCC receives a signal to disengage. With the gas pedal being held steady, release the brake pedal and the engine RPM should decrease when the TCC engages.
Old cars with Automatic Transmissions did not use a TCC. I believe the TCC was put in use in an attempt to increase fuel economy.

MY EXPERIENCE WITH SIMILAR SYMPTOMS
The condition that causes that issue on my car is this:
- A slight uphill grade increases the load on the engine.
The car tends to gradually slow and it is necessary to depress the gas pedal to maintain speed.
- Depressing the throttle pedal (manually, or automatically with cruise control engaged) signals the torque converter clutch to unlock when the load increases slightly. (A more drastic load increase would signal the Transmission to downshift to a lower gear.) The corresponding increase in engine RPM and output is enough to compensate for the reduction in speed. When the vehicle speed, engine RPM, and throttle position stabilize to the point that the TCC will engage and the engine RPM will reduce in correspondence with TCC engagement. Now, if the road conditions have not changed, power output is not enough to maintain vehicle speed. With the increased load caused by full engagement between engine and transmission, and the cycle (surging) repeats itself until the road conditions change.

Does that help?
If not:

QUESTIONS
Please define the symptoms.
What are the road conditions when the surge occurs? (A slight uphill grade?)
What is the frequency of the surge?
Does the engine power output have a noticeable surge?
Is there a speed change related to the surge?
Does the tachometer move up and down with little or no change in vehicle speed?
Are all instrument indication in the normal range?
What else has changed?

Good luck!

May 24, 2014 | Subaru Impreza WRX STi Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Speed of the lawn mower governor is missadjusted


The engine revs are turned down to make the machine noise compliant, increasing the revs will greatly increase the noise, the engine revs shouold not realy be increased, however a dealer with a suitable engine taco may do it for you, it is very important not too over speed the engine or it will self destruct,

Apr 11, 2013 | Tecumseh Lawn Boy Push Mowers Insight...

1 Answer

Screaming noise at high speeds


Sounds like wheel bearings. There just isn't a lot on that bike that increases with speed, it's either wheels or engine. If it's engine- it will make noise in neutral. If it's wheels, it will only make noise while actually moving.

Mar 01, 2013 | 1999 Honda GL 1500 SE Gold Wing

1 Answer

The vehicle engine is shut off immediately when you release the acceration pedal


PROMLEM MAY BE BECAUSE LOW IDLE SPEED ADJUSTMENT. INCREASE THE LOW SPEED/ IDLE SPEED BY INCREASING THE FUEL INTAKE . IN CARBURATOR VEH. ADJUST THE IDLE SCREW CLOCKWISE. IF IT IS FUEL INJECTOR INCREASE THE FUEL AT PUMP ITSELF.

Nov 19, 2010 | Isuzu i-280 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Performance issue


Did you check the ignition timing of the engine before you fire it up? Increase in temperature with increase in load is usually caused by retarted ignition timing.

Apr 17, 2009 | 1995 Suzuki Sidekick

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