Question about JVC AV-27D303 27" TV

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Lightning I am an insurance adjuster, I want to fairly settle a customers claim for a TV that was damaged due to power surge caused by lightning. TV is a tube type JVC AV-27d303 27" Can anyone tell me what happens when a TV is subjected to power surge caused by lightning? The TV does go on, but the screen is definetly not right. Screen lights up strangely and the power button will not go off once you turn it on. By policy language, I need to repair if it can be repaired for less then the cost of the TV ($445.00) Any information will be appreciated.

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Re: Lightning

Hi adjuster...I'm sorry I'm not prepared to specifically list the chain of events when an individual electronic component, let alone a series of electronic components, which, when properly phased, assembled, and provided applicable AC/DC voltage/wattage/amperage is exposed to currents in excess 500% of it's inherent design specifications. However, this paragraph does directly pertain to your last sentence in your post, which is intended to give you the insight into the methodology required to answer your seemingly simple question of "what happens when a TV is subjected........" I understand your predicament, which is causing you to ask this question. I understand that no T is left un-crossed in the specifications of your Policy and Remediation practices, however, I think you're going to have to interpret this case in the Spirit of the Intention with the policy. Although this particular TV may have been on the high-end of the spectrum within it's class at the time of release, for $445.00 you could replace this with a new current tube type TV, which in todays market, could be in the high-end of the spectrum in tube tv's. And therein lies your predicament because you will be exceeding your limit of making your Client WHOLE. If this is stated as unacceptable as a standard within your company, you do have an argument in that you have a wonderful marketing and relationship tool with this Client by selling the fact that you are exceeding the indemnification limits by replacing his unit with a better one, yet staying within replacement costs.....I hope I have helped you with your issue.....good luck my friend

Posted on Aug 08, 2007

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As an electrician, when someone loses more then 1 item of electronics in 1 day, its almost
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Your electrician can provide whole-house protection, or per-circuit protection at
the breaker box, where a GFCI breaker (or better, an AFCI breaker) can be installed.
GFCI = ground fault circuit interruptor
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Lightning protection is especially important in Florida, which is the "lightning capital of the world."
I've never found a good solution to lightning-fried electronics (random power supply components are destroyed), other than renters insurance or homeowners insurance.
If desperate, you could try replacing the entire power supply as a module, but even this provides
no guarantee of a fix - lightning damage can extend beyond the power supply.
When traveling, I will always unplug everything before I leave (except the security system),
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2 Answers

After a lightning storm, my TV will not turn on. Is there a fuse or something on the in coming power that may have blown causing it not to turn on?

Any TV subjected to a power surge will have problems. If you can remove the back cover, do so. Locate the glass fuse. In the best situations the fuse is clear and opened, and replacement will repair your TV. In worst cases the fuse may be blackened, and you will see that many components are burned and shattered. If this latter is true, only replacing the TV is your best bet. In many cases electronics may be connected to surge protectors, but lightning will over ride these devices and cause damage. I have seen this happen many times.Thanks for asking and show all hands of support!

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Got a 47 inch flat screen sanyo. tv will power on get a picture for about 10 sec and then turn off. transformer outside of house was struck by lightning

Sound like you had a power surge that has taken out the invertoer power supply capacitors...these are electrolytic capacitors that will be taken out by surges(it's a veryu common problem) can take the cover off the back and look for the power supply board(it will be the one with the ac line cord going to it...look at the cylindrical components on the board to see if they look bloated of have some fluid leaking out of them..this would indicate a bad capacitor...if you don't want to take the unit apart you can take to a shop and have them look at it...note: If you own your home and you have homeowners should cover the tv if you had a close lightning strike...just a suggestion

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1 Answer

This morning I tried to turn my RCA TV (model 24R411T) on and nothing happened. I tried plugging it into a different outlet, still nothing. I tried leaving it unplugged about 10 minutes and trying again,...


Power surges or nearby lightning strikes can destroy electronic equipment. However, most of the time, damage is minimal or at least easily repaired. With a direct hit, you may not recognize what is left of it!

Ideally, electronic equipment should be unplugged (both AC line and phone line!) during electrical storms if possible. Modern TVs, VCRs, microwave ovens, and even stereo equipment is particularly susceptible to lightning and surge damage because some parts of the circuitry are always alive and therefore have a connection to the AC line. Telephones, modems, and faxes are directly connected to the phone lines. Better designs include filtering and surge suppression components built in. With a near-miss, the only thing that may happen is for the internal fuse to blow or for the microcontroller to go bonkers and just require power cycling. There is no possible protection against a direct strike. However, devices with power switches that totally break the line connection are more robust since it takes much more voltage to jump the gap in the switch than to fry electronic parts. Monitors and TVs may also have their CRTs magnetized due to the electromagnetic fields associated with a lightning strike - similar but on a smaller scale to the EMP of a nuclear detonation.

Was the TV operating or on standby at the time? If it was switched off using an actual power switch (not a logic pushbutton or the remote control), then either a component in front of the switch has blown, the surge was enough to jump the gap between the switch contacts, or it was just a coincidence (yeh, right).

If the TV was operating or on standby or has no actual power switch, then a number of parts could be fried.

TVs usually have their own internal surge protection devices like MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) after the fuse. So it is possible that all that is wrong is that the line fuse has blown. Remove the cover (unplug it first!) and start at the line cord. If you find a blown fuse, remove it and measure across the in-board side of fuse holder and the other (should be the neutral) side of the line. The ohmmeter reading should be fairly high - well certainly not less than 100 ohms - in at least one direction. You may need to unplug the degaussing coil to get a reasonable reading as its resistance may be 25 or 30 ohms. If the reading is really low, there are other problems. If the resistance checks out, replace the fuse and try powering the TV. There will be 3 possibilities:

It will work fine, problem solved.

It will immediately blow the fuse. This means there is at least one component shorted - possibilities include an MOV, line rectifiers, main filter cap, regulator transistor, horizontal output transistor, etc. You will need to check with your ohmmeter for shorted semiconductors. Remove any that are suspect and see of the fuse now survives (use the series light bulb to cut your losses - see the section.

It will not work properly or appear dead. This could mean there are open fusable resistors other defective parts in the power supply or elsewhere. In this case further testing will be required and at some point you may need the schematic.

Jun 14, 2010 | RCA 27R411T 27" TV

1 Answer

MY tv was hit by lightning its a sony trinitron model kv-XA29M20A

this may sound daft but ANY electronic equipment hit by lightening should be thrown away. it is not worth even trying to repair it.

try claiming on your home insurance policy.

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1 Answer

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1 Answer

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Assuming this line is across the screen horizontally (side to side), this means the vertical deflection circuitry is dead. In late model sets, there is a Integrated circuit package which drives the vertical yoke coils. Possible defects: the I.C. itself, bad solder connections where it solders to the board, missing voltage source to this I.C. (often around +24 volts), or a bad electrolytic capacitor in the associated circuitry. This latter often results in a non-linear picture, or less than full deflection condition, rather than a thin line only. It is possible lightning caused this problem, (I've seen some rather illogical damage from lightning ) perhaps it produced enough of a surge to pop the I.C. or a fusible resistor in that voltage source noted above.

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The power surges and lighting damages are ussually extensive,alot of times more than one component and more than one circuit gets damage,home owner insurance cover this damages but the insurance company does not repair the damaged unit they replace them because is not worth repairing.To troubleshoot you will need the squematic diagram to locate and correct the different circuits that might be involved ,be careful there are voltages that can hurt you if you are not too familiar and touch one by accident.

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1 Answer


90 % of the time, when you get lightning damage to a tv set, its not worth repairing, because the chain reaction the surge causes. Its a matter of labor v cost of a new set. Ive seen brand new large screen tvs 1 week old get popped with lighyning and cause every board in the set to bur and blow out not only the printed circuit traces, but the ICs had holes in them and the transistors were blow apart. Luckly this customer had homeowners insurance and got a new set. With a lightning strick all you can do is start from the front of the power supply an work your way back till you get some life in the set. Now you could get lucky as I know panasonic uses whats called a thyristor type of a device that when a surge enters the set it shorts out the ac plug and pops the internal fuse and it will be black. You cant simply replace the fuse cause the thyrisistor is shorted. Also no one with no teleivision training should be inside a tv now a days as there are no user serviceable parts inside and theres way way more voltage inside these sets ,even unplugged then a dvd or satillite reciver. I would advise you to get a pro to assist you in this matter as it could if your lucky ,like i said before be a simple problem But i've seen peeps make a mountain out of a molehill. Good Luck

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