Question about Emerson DA-4Head VCR

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How can I process only audio through the unit successfully?

I'm trying to record some audio through tape to get a warmer, vintage feel. The audio out in the back works just fine, however I can't seem to get the in to work. I picked up at a thrift store and do not have a manual. Could somebody tell me how I can get the audio in working? Is there a specific way to record on a specific channel or something? I'm completely lost.

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Somewhere on the menu screen will be a setting that switches the Tuner sound off so you can switch to the line input. Look under the sound menu if it has one. I can't tell you what setting or button to push as I don't know the model. Earlier VCR's had a simple switch on the front or back. But some stupid designer thought it would be better to put it on the menu system!

Posted on May 19, 2013

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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All the "holes" are labeled. Be logical. That's why God gave you a brain and taught you how to read.

The tuner goes into TUNER. The two recorders go into TAPE ONE and TAPE TWO.

If you want to equalize recordings, put the equalizer before the recorder. Otherwise, sell it.

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Hello.....I have a unit similar to yours...and I never had that ptoblem...These units are cool and I love mine...but the cassette players are generally basic units...When you record are you listening to the music at the same time so that you know what's going on?....Ok....When you start the recording process....and you see the disc is rcording...and the cassette finished playing one side...you PAUSE the cd....Flip the tape....press the Pause again to restart the cd...I've never saw one of these types of uits with auto reverse...you have to flip the tape manualy...if you don't...you will only record half of the music....I hope this was helpful.....PEACE.......

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I'm going to assume you mean an audio mixer and maybe an AV receiver.

The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop. And since you don't name the EQ I'll make some broad generalizations that you should be able to adapt to your equipment. They're all pretty much the same for hook-up anyway.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the selected stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose some form of STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up:

It's should be clearly marked on the back of the Mixer where everything goes.

The Line IN and Line Out would go to any available Tape Loop on the receiver. Something that has Out's and In's. Obviously, Out's on one device go to In's on the next.

So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck or anothere processor you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks and those loops can be engaged or bypassed via controls on the EQ or Processor.

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The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop. And since you don't name the EQ I'll make some broad generalizations that you should be able to adapt to your equipment. They're all pretty much the same for hook-up anyway.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the selected stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose some form of STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up:

It's should clearly marked on the back of the EQ where everything goes.

The Line IN and Line Out would go to any available Tape Loop on the receiver. Something that has Out's and In's. Obviously, Out's on one device go to In's on the next.

So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck or anothere processor you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks and those loops can be engaged or bypassed via controls on the EQ or Processor

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1 Answer

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The connections themselves are fairly simple but it pays to understand what happens in the loop. And since you don't name the EQ I'll make some broad generalizations that you should be able to adapt to your equipment. They're all pretty much the same for hook-up anyway.

In general, any Line-Level external processor (EQ, dynamic range expander, etc) will go into a Tape Monitor loop on a receiver. A Tape Monitor, when engaged, sends the selected stereo analog signal Out to the Processor, massages it and returns it to the receiver via the Tape Monitor IN connectors to be passed on to the receiver's internal processes (volume, tone, whatever).

Old school analog stereo-only receivers consistently work this way. Newer digital and audio/video receivers introduce a couple of problems: 1) digital sound processing to simulate a variety of soundfields; 2) multiple output channels, either discrete or digitally-generated.

The latter requires that whatever signal is being processed experiences a maximum of one analog-digital-analog conversion.

EVERYTHING analog coming into the modern digital receiver is automatically converted to a digital signal for internal processing unless you choose some form of STEREO-only or STEREO-Direct setting. Consequently, no further external analog-digital conversions would be allowed if, say, a Tape Monitor circuit was activated, and a possible feedback loop could otherwise be created in a digital-sourced selection (output to its own input), so the unit is wired to treat the Tape Monitor as the first analog step in the process and defeats any pure digital sources.

In a multichannel unit, what would happen to the other channels if you sent ONLY the Front Left & Right out for processing? The rest would NOT be processed. That logical problem also plays into the decision to defeat digital sources if the Tape Monitor is activated. I don't totally agree with the engineers but that's the way it is. Nature of the digital beast.

Okay, back to the hook-up:

It's should clearly marked on the back of the EQ where everything goes.

The Line IN and Line Out would go to any available Tape Loop on the receiver. Something that has Out's and In's. Obviously, Out's on one device go to In's on the next.

So, to sum up, you can only use the EQ or any outboard processor for analog stereo sources. If you actually want to use an analog recording deck or anothere processor you could place it within the typical Equalizer's own Tape Monitor loop(s). Many have two to facilitate equalized dubbing between decks and those loops can be engaged or bypassed via controls on the EQ or Processor

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Why not plug the cassette directly into the CD recorder? Are they trying to achieve some eqalization change? If not, then this should work. It's all analog at tape level.

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