Question about Canon Speedlite 430EX TTL Flash

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Now what? When my speedlite is on my camera, and I am shooting in manual, it won't allow me to adjust my shutter speed any higher than 200. What is going on?

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200 is the "safe" speed at which the shutter curtains are open in order to expose the sensor to light. If you use too fast a speed , then the shutter will be closing by the time the flash is fired and a black (unexposed) band will appear on the picture. See these example pics: http://is.gd/lSFjLE
Luckily, you can override these settings by selecting "Hi Speed" on the back of the flash unit. This will allow you to use all speeds up to 1/8000 sec. Be warned though that the power decreases somewhat so that far away subjects won't get good coverage.
Hope this helps.

Posted on Jan 09, 2014

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Nothing is going on. Your camera is working as designed.
Most cameras have an upper limit on the shutter speed when used with flash. This is called the flash sync speed. At speeds higher than this the shutter is never opened completely, and as a result you would get only a narrow slit of a picture.
Usually this is not a problem since the exposure is determined almost exclusively by the flash and the aperture. Any action is caught and stopped by the brief flash, not the shutter. The primary reason for controlling the shutter speed is to use a slow speed to allow the background to expose.
Your camera may have a special high-speed flash mode that fires off multiple flashes coordinated with the shutter movement. Since you didn\'t say what model Canon camera you\'re using, I can only suggest you check the manual.

Posted on Apr 26, 2013

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1 Answer

Why the flash of the camera are not sincronize with imagine and sometime is shooting down when I shooting.


Your camera probably has a flash shutter speed, typically around 1/200 second, and if you choose a higher speed then only part of the image will be exposed.

Apr 20, 2016 | Olympus E-420 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Cant set shutter speed past 200


Is the flash turned on? The camera won't let you set a shutter speed faster than 1/200 when the flash is on.

Dec 08, 2012 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend...


If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
steve_con_96.jpg
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.

steve_con_97.jpg

Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Oct 12, 2011 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

2 Answers

I bought this lense and need instant help. I am shooting pics at a high school football game and it gets dark early. What settings do I switch my camera to in order to get sufficient light and capture all...


Shooting sports and the evening can be a compromise between needed s fast shutter to stop action or a longer shutter to allow enough light for a good exposure. Fortunately, you've got a "fast" lens. My suggestions are:

Shoot in "A" mode (aperture priority) and change the aperture of the lens to the lowest number available to make the aperture open to maximum, and increase the ISO to 400 or 800. You may even get satisfactory results at ISO1600, but you should check the results on a computer screen before blindly going out shooting at the level.

By increasing the aperture, two things happen; exposure times are reduced to minimum so that motion is stopped (or blur minimized) and the the depth of field becomes very narrow or "shallow". Depth of field or "DOF" describes the distance in front and beyond the point of focus that will also be in focus. Large apertures (low "f" number s like 1.4 to 2.8 ) = narrow DOF and small apertures (high "f" numbers like 16 to 22 and beyond) = wide DOF. An example would be if you took a picture of someone's face from a2 feet away at f 1.4 and focused on the tip of the nose - the eyes would begin to get soft or out of focus - the ears would be even more noticeable - and that background would very blurred. The same picture at f 22 nearly everything would be in focus - except for maybe the background - depending how far behind it is from the subject's head. Check the example below:

steve_con_4.jpeg
Look at the backgrounds of the pictures above. The left is largely in focus at f 8 while the right is blurry at f 2.5. Had left been shot at f 22 or more, more of the background would be in focus.


Increasing the ISO to 400 or 800 increases the camera's sensitivity to light like film. The higher the ISO, the less time it takes to get a properly exposed picture. High ISO are helpful in low light situations or other times you need to have a faster shutter speed (for sports or don't have a tripod for pictures that need long exposures). Assume you want to take a picture of something that the camera tells you won't be exposed correctly unless you shoot at say for example f 2.8 and shutter is 1/30 second. If the camera ISO was set to 100, you could change it to 200. This doubles the sensitivity to light - meaning you need 1/2 the light; you can change the f number from f 2.8 to f 4, OR, leave it at 2.8 and increase the shutter speed to the next faster value 1/60 sec. If you change the ISO to 400, it is now 4x's sensitive than 100 (or 2x's than 200). At ISO 400, you could go two f stops smaller to f 5.6 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/125. For ISO 800, you could go three f stops smaller to f 8 or stay at 2.8 and increase shutter from 1/30 to 1/250. You can mix and match, too. Go one up on the speed and two smaller on the aperture. The drawback to higher ISOs is that the pictures become grainier with each increase. Eventually, the pictures don't look good when you get into ISO numbers above 800 (or less on some DSLR cameras - and even less on point and shoot types). You have to experiment to find where your preferences are. See below for Low and High ISO comparison shots:

steve_con_86.jpg
The left picture above has nice, smooth transitions between shades of colors - the right picture has a grainy appearance called "noise". Some is acceptable but others are not - it depends what YOU can live with. Sometimes it's better to have a grainy shot than nothing at all.

Lastly, you can shoot "S" for shutter mode, to control motion instead of "A" which controls volume of light instead. The same principles apply.

I hope this helps & good luck!

Sep 08, 2011 | Tamron SP AF 70200mm f28 Di LD IF Makro...

1 Answer

What settings would I use taking low light action pictures


In general, taking action pictures is all about getting as much light in the camera as possible. In lieu of light, you can increase the camera's sensitivity to the light. This is called your ISO sensitivity and the higher the ISO, the more sensitive to light your camera is, and therefore they allow you to shoot with a faster shutter speed. The faster your shutter speed, the clearer your action pictures will be. In general, try a shutter speed of at least 1/250. Be warned: The higher your ISO, the more grainy your pictures may be, and if you have a consumer-end camera (point-and-shoot, or 4/3rds SLR) any higher than ISO 800 will most likely destroy the quality of your photos. If possible at all, try adding more light.

Hope this helped.

Chuck

May 06, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

Shutter speed actomatic change


If you move from mode to mode, the camera will remember the settings from the last time you were in that mode and reset to them. This is handy if you are in shutter priority shooting sports at a high shutter speed, and then want to take a picture of something that's not moving fast, like the crowd. You just pop it into aperature priority with a remembered settings of a higher f stop.

I use this to shoot the scoreboard, which has a fairly slow refresh rate and usually comes up blank if I shoot it at a shutter speed higher than about 1/100.

Sep 02, 2009 | Nikon D300 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

When on sports setting, my camera shoots slow and blurry when indoors


More than likely, your exposure- specifically your shutter speed settings- are too low. When you have fast action, you must have a higher shutter speed (Higher, meaning that the DURATION of the exposure is less. So, an exposure of 1/250th of a second is more desirable than an exposure of 1/30th of a second when shooting indoor sports. (This difference equates to about 400% more exposure, duration-wise). When shooting sports indoors, a "Fast" lens, meaning that the front of the lens is bigger, which allows more light into the camera at one time. (This normally equates to "F-Stop" settings. So, a 50mm F1.4 lens will be a "faster" lens than a 50mm F2 lens. The lower the F number, the "faster" the lens. This also equates to higher prices...) Another consideration for shooting stop-action sports photography indoors is using higher ISO settings. When you double the ISO number, you cut the amount of light required to make a good exposure in half. So, ISO 200 requires half the light of ISO100, and 400 requires half the light of 200 and so on. Typically, I use a setting of ISO 800 or higher for indoor sports (Which, BTW is my speciality...). The trade-off for using higher ISO settings is that it introduces more noise into the image, which many people find less desirable. I also wrote a few articles for POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY & IMAGING about shooting sports. The "football" article will more than likely be the most help to you. Basically, ALL sports photography is shot the same way, and if you use these techniques, your work will greatly improve. Here is a link to those, and hope they help!

http://www.popphoto.com/Blogs/Sports-Photography

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/Shooting-Talladega-Superspeedway

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/How-to-Photograph-Football

Jul 10, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Adjust shutter speed


On most indoor shots the shutter speed will normally be 1/30 if you need or want it to be faster than that the only way to do that with this camera is to set the ISO to a higher value. Page 29 of your user manual explains how to set the ISO value for the camera to allow for faster shutter speeds.

May 01, 2009 | Olympus Stylus / mju 1050 SW Digital...

1 Answer

Shutter speed won't go above 200


I have two possible solutions:

First, are you shooting with the flash up or an external flash connected to it? If so, the camera likely needs to synchronize at 1/200 or slower otherwise it won't be able to take a full photo. As a safety feature to prevent that, many new cameras just restrict the ability to pick a faster shutter speed.

Second, if its not related to the flash, it might be related to the mode you are using. Turn the camera off the automatic modes and put it on an all manual setting. Change the ISO to 400 or so, got outside and aim up at the day's sky, put it on manual mode and then adjust the shutter speed. Open up the aperture on your lens all the way (turn it to the smallest number). Now adjust the shutter speeds. It should be able to go past 200 now.

Nov 25, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel G 35mm SLR Camera

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