Question about Nikon Monarch ATB 7345 Binocular

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Replacement nikon binocular lens covers

The eyepiece covers fall off all the time. Are there better ones out there?

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Need eyepieces for Nikon Monarch ATB 8x42 Binoculars

If its the caps that cover them Nikon in your country can order them. They take about six to eight weeks if they are not in stock. If its the actual eyepiece lens an all you would need to have purposfully removed them and in doing so destroyed the waterproofing. If its the caps contact Nikon. You can also download the instructions from their website.

Posted on Jul 31, 2009

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SOURCE: Where can I buy replacement lens caps for my nikon

Nikons Service center can order the parts for you. If they are not in stock takes about 6 to 8 weeks. I rang them and got the part number. They sent me an order form by email I filled it in, scanned it and I got my parts sent to me.
Nikon have service centers in many countries. Check their website. Failing that try binoculars.com or adorama camera in the US. They are good to deal with and ship internationally as well.

Posted on Jul 31, 2009

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I need to replace eye pieces for Baush and Lomb elite 61-2843. These are the flexible eye relief cups.


Contact Bushnell, they will most likely ask for the binoculars shipped to them so they can replace the lenses. If the rubber eyeguards are cracking, contact Nikon below.

Eyecup (8X32 SE and 10X42 SE)
Nikon Part Number 7636

Eyepiece rainguard (covers both eyepieces)
Nikon Part Number 7634

Objective cap (SE 8X32)
Nikon Part Number 7678

The flexible eyecups are easy to remove and replace...if you just take your time working them on and off.


http://www.nikonusa.com/fileuploads/westernservice/moving.html
Nikon Parts Department
841 Apollo Street
Suite 100
El Segundo, CA 90245-4721
New Phone 310-414-8107
New Fax 310-335-9242
Our toll-free numbers will remain the same:
1-800-NIKONUX (for technical support)
1-800-NIKONSV (for service support)

Oct 30, 2011 | Optics

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

2 Answers

I bought the 10x25 camera binoculars and only one lens will focus using the center dial. Its almost like the other one needs to be focused at the eye piece itself. The pictures are not clear and are...


It is common for binoculars to have one independently focusable eyepiece.  If one eyepiece can be rotated, then that is the case.
If that is the case, focus through the one that DOES NOT rotate using the center control until you get a sharp image on that side.  Then rotate the eyepiece on the blurry side until the blurry side is sharp.  If you succeed at this, from henceforth the center control will focus both eyes adequately

Aug 11, 2010 | Sharper Image Optics

1 Answer

Binocular out of synch, get a slight double image.


The yoke which carries the eyepieces has broken, allowing one lens to move independently of the other.

They can be repaired by replacing the entire yoke assembly (gluing is never accurate enough and never lasts) but the repair will not make economic sense as it will be cheaper to throw them away and buy another pair unless you have them covered by an insurance policy.

Unfortunately, I cannot recommend a Japanese repair outlet, the closest I've used in your part of the world is in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I've always found getting repairs to cameras and other optical devices to be near impossible in Japan due to the prevalent culture of buying new rather than getting things fixed.

Apart from in Kuala Lumpur, I've generally found that optical repair specialists worldwide typically have a six week turnaround time unless you pay a lot extra for the 24/48 hour turnaround aimed at professionals, so even if you can get the repair done cheaply you may decide to just replace them anyway.

However I have found an old list of Nikon repair outlets which you may wish to try and contact to ask for advice.

Nikon Service Centres Fukuoka (092) 415-6350 Nagoya (052) 954-0122 Nihonbashi: (03) 3281-6810 Niigata: (025) 222-1461 Omiya: (048) 644-8011 Sapporo: (011) 231-7896 Sendai: (022) 227-1237 Shinjuku: (03) 3349-0701 Yokohama: (045) 312-1101
Hope this helps, if so please return the favour by taking a moment to rate my answer.

Jan 24, 2010 | Optics

1 Answer

Replacement parts for Tasco binoculars


You'll need to measure your eyepiece in "mm". Also determine if your eyepiece has an outer ring the eyepiece will slip over. You can find eyecups/guards on Ebay. Search under Binocular Eyecup or Binocular Eye Guard. There are also eyecups under "rubber eyecups/rubber eyeguards" but alot of these are for Microscopes and may not fit. You will need to pay close attention to the mounting type and measurements.

Sep 18, 2009 | Tasco Wide Angle and Rubber 2023 (10x50MM)...

1 Answer

I bought these for my husband. In trying them


Difficult to answer specifically without knowing the model. But binoculars are designed to view objects in the distance. They all have a limit as to how close they will focus based on the magnification and design. Objective lenses that are far apart such as on a porro prism binocular will not focus very close. The nature of the design of having the objectives further apart than the eyepieces doesn't allow it. When trying to focus too close the image will appear blurred and double. That is the nature of the design. 9 feet or 3 metres is considered quite close to focus a binocular and is usually for a model designed to do this such as a roof prism where the objective lens and the eye lenses are inline. A specialty binocular such as the Pentax Papilo will close focus to 50 centimeters. It has been designed so that the objective (large lenses) lenses converge.

Take into account when focusing that binoculars are also designed to compensate for differences in each eye. One of the eyepieces either right or left will adjust seperately. For binoculars with a center focus ring. First focus using the center ring with one eye covered. The eye that should be covered is the one that doesn't have the adjusting eyepiece. When the image is clear close the eye you have just used and leave the center focus alone. Focusing on the same spot look through the eyepiece that adjusts and turn the eyepiece ring until the image is clear. Now all you have to do is focus using the center ring only as the binoculars are adjusted for each eye.

Some binoculars do not have a center focus and each eye will adjust seperately.

Jul 29, 2009 | Optics

2 Answers

Lost Nikon Travelite ex eye piece


I'm supposing by eyepiece you mean the rubber or plastic eyecup. The eyepiece is the whole unit that contains the lens. Nikon has a service center in many countries. If you have one in your country then they can order the part. I have ordered from Nikon. They find the part number if you tell them your model and can email you an order form. Alternately Binoculars.com is very good to deal with as is Adorama Camera in New York. Both will sell internationally.

Jul 13, 2009 | Nikon Travelite V Binoculars

1 Answer

Need eyepieces for Nikon Monarch ATB 8x42 Binoculars


If its the caps that cover them Nikon in your country can order them. They take about six to eight weeks if they are not in stock. If its the actual eyepiece lens an all you would need to have purposfully removed them and in doing so destroyed the waterproofing. If its the caps contact Nikon. You can also download the instructions from their website.

Jul 08, 2009 | Nikon Monarch ATB 7344 Binocular

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