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Will rca leads effect amp turning on working fine but now wont come on just took head unit out and 1 of the rca s all loose

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I have a disel audio nsx-8002 it is 800wats and i have 2 12 they are sonyo expose 1000wats each do i need to braige them yes or now

Posted on Mar 13, 2009

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WHAT DO IT MEAN FOR MY AMP TO READ DIAGNOSTIC


The diagnostic light, for this particular model, means that there is either a short circuit on the loudspeaker leads or there is an internal amplifier fault that is causing a DC offset. In order to determine which, disconnect all RCA and speaker leads while keeping the +12 volt, power ground and remote leads connected. Now turn the amplifier back on, and if the diagnostic LED lights up, the amp has an internal fault. If not, plug the RCA cables back in and reset the amp. If it goes into diagnostic now, the problem is with the input (either bad cables or a faulty head unit). If the amp is fine with the RCA cables plugged in, repeat the process with the speaker cables (one at a time). When you plug in the faulty speaker wire it will put the amp into diagnostic mode.

Mar 06, 2011 | Hifonics XX-Hercules Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

My amp is working fine but turns off when i insert a CD


Hello pumpin_up_da,

The most likely cause for the problem you describe is that the remote turn-on lead to the amp is functional only when the head unit is operating in tuner mode. This could be caused by using a power antenna lead instead of a remote lead. Some head units have both, some only one or the other. Check the wire going to the amp remote terminal with a voltmeter. If it shows 12V when the radio is operated in tuner mode but 0V when you switch to CD, then check the wiring. If this is the cause, and your head unit has a dedicated amp turn-on lead, then connect it to the amp terminal. Most head units that have both power antenna and remote leads code them "Blue" and "Blue/White". If your head unit does not have an amp turn-on lead, you need to wire it to a 12V switched source, usually the "red" wire on most aftermarket receivers. You can then put a SPST toggle switch (available at Radio Shack or most auto parts stores) in line with the wire and turn it on and off as desired.

If the correct wire from your head unit is currently connected, then the receiver is defective and needs repair or replacement. Or, if everything else still functions normally, and really don't want to bother with repair or replacement, you can still use the 12V switched source as described above.

Hope this helps.

Jul 09, 2009 | Ultra Linear UL-2200D Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Only get sound wen rca's r in halfway


You have a bad set of RCA's. Try and get a pair specifically made for car audio. There are hundreds of brands, usually the cheap ones work fine.

What usually happens is on cheap RCA cables, wires inside the actual plug split apart and short out on one another. Get another set of cables and you'll be fine.

Jan 30, 2009 | Alpine MRP-M450 Car Audio Amplifier

2 Answers

Protect Mode with RCA's


It sounds like you have some DC voltage on the RCA input.

You need to figure out if the problem is coming from the head unit or if it is in the amplifier.

If you have a voltage meter, you can use it to find out very quickly.

Set the meter for DC and for a max level of more than 12 volts. Most meters I use have a 30 volt level. That would be a good setting.

Take the black lead and make sure it is grounded to the chassis of the car or to the ground of the power terminal, be careful and make sure it does not touch anything else.

With the RCA cable disconnected put the red lead on the inner part of the RCA cable and see if there is any DC voltage and then check the ground or outer part of the cable. Do the same for the other channel as well.

It should be very close to zero volts. A couple of millivolts is fine to. Any voltage here will cause the amplifier to go into protect mode, which is what is happening to you. You will then need to have the head unit serviced.

If you have a Pioneer head unit, I have seen many of them with an open ground fuse for the RCA jack. That fuse is a surface mounted fuse and is very small and hard to locate on the main board of the radio. If you do have a Pioneer head unit the voltage may seem OK, but you will have an open ground, but that normally does not put the amp into protect. It makes the audio sound very weak and you would have a loud hum. I can help you with that if it turns out to be the problem.

If the voltage on both the RCA leads is OK, then you need to check the amplifier.

You can put the meter lead on the ground of the RCA jack on the amplifier, if you have anything abnormal there, you have a problem in the amplifier. Be careful checking this because you can easily touch the lead to the chassis of the amplifier at the same time as the RCA ground. Most of the time, if yu have a problem in the amplifier like the one you are having, this check of the RCA ground will result in some DC voltage on it. If it still checks OK, then put the lead into the RCA ground and check the positive part of it. You may need to move the lead around a little to get it to touch the metal inside, it is on the bottom part of the hole inside the jack.

I think you will find that you have some voltage on the RCA inputs of the amplifier. To fix this properly you will need to take it in to be serviced.

Sometimes you can ground the RCA jack ground somehow with a jumper wire and then turn the system on with the RCA cable plugged in and it will seem normal. But you do not want to do that as a repair, only to see if the amp will play. If it does play, you know that the problem is in the pre-amp of the amplifier. That would be the only reason to connect an external ground to the RCA jack. You still have a problem in the amplifier. If it does not play normal, you still have a problem in the amplifier if there was some DC on the RCA jack.

Sorry this answer is so long, but the problem you are having will require service of one of your units, you just need to know which one it is. If your inputs get grounded, you will not have the amp go into protect, you just won't hear anything.

Let me know if you need more help and if this was helpful to you a good rating is always appreciated.

Jun 22, 2008 | Power Acoustik TS1440-2 Car Audio...

2 Answers

No audio to speakers from deck, just to amp


It's possible (probable) that the head unit has a blown internal amplifier IC. Measure the DC voltage on each of the 8 speaker wires on the head unit. Place the black lead on the chassis of the head unit. Probe each wire with the red lead. All should read approximately 1/2 of the voltage on the yellow wire. If you get some that are significantly higher or lower, disconnect all speaker wires from the harness and measure again. If the voltage is still not ~1/2 of the voltage on the yellow wire, the IC is almost certainly defective.

For the external amp, you need to check the shield ground for the head unit. The following page shows you how.

Test RCA shield ground

Apr 21, 2008 | Pioneer GM-X372 Car Audio Amplifier

1 Answer

Protection light turn on with sound


It's likely that the amp is defective but you should check the shield ground of the RCA signal cables before sending the amp off for repair.

 

Disconnect the RCA cables from the amp.

 

With your multimeter set to ohms, measure the resistance from the outer shield of the RCA cable to chassis ground. If it's more than a few ohms, that could be causing your problem.

 

If this is higher than a few ohms, short the meter's leads together to make sure the meter will go down to 0 ohms.

 

To check the shield ground of the head unit (assuming that the head unit is driving the amp directly), disconnect the RCA cables from the head unit and measure the resistance from the RCA output shield to the case of the head unit. It should essentially read 0 ohms.

 

 

Oct 21, 2007 | Cerwin Vega XL 600.1 Car Audio Amplifier

2 Answers

ZR360 BLOWING UP MY SUBS


The ZR series amps had several problems that could be an issue for your amp. The modules failed and caused intermittent problems. If you know someone with a similar amp, try to borrow their module. The solder connections on the vertical board (the one the module pluges into) develops cracks in the solder connection where the vertical board connects to the main board. The amps have a fuse that is connected in series between the input RCA shield and the secondary ground. This fuse can be blown by shorted speaker wires (shorting to chassis ground). It's a surface mount fuse that's under the main board. Virtually all of these should be checked and/or repaired by a qualified technician. There is also the possibility that the head unit is damaged (assuming the head unit is connected directly to the amp). If the shields for the RCA jacks are open, it can cause the same problems as when the shield fuse opens in the amplifier. To check the shields of the head unit, you unplug all of the RCA cables from the head unit and measure the resistance between the shield of the RCA output jack and the case of the head unit. There should be no more than ~1-2 ohms resistance between any of the RCA output jack shields and the case. If there is significant resistance or it's open, the head unit needs to be repaired.

Sep 14, 2007 | Kicker ZR360 Car Audio Amplifier

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