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Overflow drain when i use my washer yhe drain in the garden backs up and overfows. also my water in my downstairs toilet rises to the top when flushing and is very slow to drain.please could you give me some ideas were to start

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Start with the main sewer trap

Posted on Mar 15, 2009


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Rotten eggs smell


The smell is sewer gas coming back in the house from the sewer or septic tank ether from a dried out water trap in a floor or fixture drain, or from the roof vent, or a hole or separation in pipe or fitting. Like wax ring under toilet. First pore water down every drain to fill any trap that might have gone dry, then flush toilet or run washer or drain bath tub.This will displace gas in pipe and will cause the smell to increases if there is no smell then the problem is fixed if not check roof vent it may need a charcoal filter on top, There is no water trap on air vent on roof and is an open hole to the sewer or septic, The heating system in the winter or AC in summer will draw the gas inside from the vent.If it is the vent you should be able to smell it from outside. If all tests fails You will need to have a smoke test done. A smoker is set up outside and the line is filled with smoke and will show where gas is coming from. Also it might be a good ideal to check all gas fittings in case it is a gas leak.

Jun 15, 2014 | Drains

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Tub drains slow


does your bathtub drain slow, and toilet not flush? dont call a plumber just yet, Every fixture in your home should have a air vent associated with it. the vents allow gases to escape and are necessary in allowing the waist water to flowout and down the pipes. most vents lead up through the roof, these are usualy 2" in diameter and raise up about 20" from the roof. there are other ventsin and around the home like the drain pipe for your washer or the overflow drains in sinks and tubs. If you have a tub that drains slow its usually hair buildup in the trap and is simple to clear. If you have a problem like the one i had and you've tried everything and it still wont drain the vent may be clogged. In my case the toilet wouldnt flush allong with the tub draining very slow, I threw every thing i could at the problem including removing the toilet and running a power snake. You can imagine how i felt when i put the toiket back in place and when i flushed it nothing happened:( after some thought i went to the tub and removed the chrome cap 0ver the overflow and ran a wire with the end bent like a hook as i pulled the wire out the toilet flushed, on the end of the wire was a clump of hair . problem solved!

on May 05, 2012 | Drains

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What to do if your toilet stops working


When a toilet stops working it can be a major inconvenience. If your toilet isn't working right, try the simple fixes below.

If the toilet doesn't flush:

When you jiggle the handle, nothing happens. Remove the lid from the toilet tank and peek inside. Most likely, either the chain came off at the lift rod or flapper end, or the rod broke in half. If the chain came off the rod, you can simply reattach it. (Finding the right amount of slack will take some trial and error.) Likewise, if it came off of the flapper, it can easily be reattached.

If the lift rod (the arm attached to the handle) is broken, you can purchase a new rod and handle assembly for a few bucks at just about any hardware store. A plastic nut holds the handle into the side of the tank and the whole assembly can be popped out and replaced. Once you've installed the new assembly, reattach the chain.

If the toilet keeps running:

Remove the tank lid and watch the toilet as it flushes. You'll probably see that the chain is too tight, causing the flapper to not close all the way, which results in water continuing to drain out and having to be replenished. Loosen the chain a little and see if it fixes the problem.

Another cause of a constantly-running toilet is an improper float height. The float is the balloon-looking thing that sits on the end of a shaft and falls and then rises when the toilet is flushed. When the float reaches a certain height, the fill valve is closed and the water stops flowing. If your toilet is running longer than it should, push down a tiny bit on the float and see if it stops running. If it does, the float just needs to be adjusted downward a little (by turning the screw at the other end of its shaft). You may need to try a few different heights to determine the optimal position of the float; adjust it slightly and flush the toilet, then adjust it again if necessary.

If there's not enough water pressure:

The chain may be too loose if there isn't enough pressure. With the tank lid off, watch the toilet flush. If there is too much slack in the chain, the flapper may close prematurely, reducing water pressure. Tighten the chain and see if that makes a difference.

Loss of water pressure can also be caused by the holes in the toilet bowl getting clogged up. There are little holes all around the side of the bowl, where water is forced into the bowl to refill it after a flush. If any of these holes get clogged, clean them out with a round file, a nail punch, or a similarly-shaped instrument. (Don't push too hard or hammer on the bowl.)

If the toilet overflows:

If your toilet overflows, the first thing to do is to turn off the water to the toilet. There is a valve on one side of the toilet, where the pipe runs from the wall to the toilet. Turn this valve clockwise to close it.

Once the water is off, use a plunger to try to clear the clog. If it works, you'll see the water drain out of the bowl. If the plunger can't clear it, try a simple drain-cleaning tool like a Zip-It or Turbo Snake. If you don't have anything that can remove the clog, or if the clog remains even after trying to clear it, you'll need to call a plumber (or buy yourself a closet auger or plumber's snake).

If you are able to remove the clog, turn the water back on and flush the toilet to make sure the clog is completely gone.

on Feb 06, 2011 | Drains

1 Answer

We bought a house 3 months ago and have been noticing a sewer gas smell after being here for a month. Our house has been completely remodeled and plumbing redone. The smell is coming from the bathtub...


I would suspect inadequate venting causing the traps to empty, if the toilet is plumbed
near the tub and the vent stack was not used then it would cause the water to be sucked out of the trap during flush.
If the trap for the sink was inserted too far it can block off venting in the vertical
run of pipe. (I once saw an entire rental property with this issue).
If the tub needs snaked it can also cause this problem as part of the venting
may be tied to the tub. Hope this helps.

Jul 02, 2011 | Drains

1 Answer

Our toilet is 127mmsfrom the wall to the centre of the s fitting and most toilets are 140mm, how can we fit a new toilet pleaase, also the water pipe is on the left hand side and toilets i have loked at...


Toilets water pipes can come on either side majority are on the left side when facing toilet.A longer water supply line can be used for the water connection if the toilet has it on the opposite side.A plumbing supply house and some good hardware stores will carry a close rough toilet that can set 50 mms closer to the wall than a standard toilet. Generally toilets are measured from the wall to the center of the drain in the floor which standard is 304.8 mm so a close rough would fit with a drain 254 mms from the wall

Jun 22, 2010 | Drains

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FIXING A TOILET THAT WILL NOT FLUSH!!! a simple but very effective money saving...


This simple how to, is based upon most lever operated toilets, with the cistern mounted above the toilet bowl. The make and model of toilet used for this feature is of the following:
Toilet and internal syphon
DUDLEY ELITEDudley S7 Cascade syphon
Problem:
My toilet will not flush, but the ball float valve is working and there is water in the cistern; no leaks present and the flushing lever is not broken or disconnected, what do I do?
Answer:
first isolate the water to the toilet or the main water supply to the house. Bail out the water from the cistern using a small jug or cup, (or you can syphon the water manually using a hosepipe or similar pipe, a towel to cover your mouth, and either a bucket or the toilet bowl) and remove water from the bottom of the cistern with a sponge.


Changing the syphon in a toilet that is not close coupled is far easier as you do not need to remove the cistern from the wall!


Undo the lower of the two large nuts beneath the cistern using a large pipe wrench or pair of water pump pliers, now disconnect the flush pipe and push it to one side.
Place a bucket or bowl beneath the cistern and undo the Nut which is immediately below the cistern (syphon replacing nut), some water may be released by the syphon, take note of any washers that are removed as new ones need fitting when replacing the siphon.
Unhook the lift rod from the flushing lever and remove the syphon.


Inside the toilet syphon, there will be a small plastic piece of sheet called a diaphragm; you can fabricate a replacement using the plastic title cover on a DVD case. Cut this to the exact same size and shape as the original part, and fit this to where the original diaphragm was. This is your new replacement.


Refitting is a complete reversal of removal, be sure to fit any washers (preferably new ones) that you have taken out. Ensure everything is tight but do not over tighten before refilling the cistern



on Aug 09, 2010 | Drains

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How to adjust a toilet


  • Your toilet tank may simply need a good "tune-up." Here are some adjustments you can make.

  • Refill valve. If your tank has a conventional ballcock refill valve, the water level is adjusted by bending the float arm. The level should be high enough for complete flushes, but the water should not be to the top of the overflow pipe. Your tank should have a colored or molded water level mark. It should never be set so low that the bowl does not refill with trap sealing water. The rule of thumb is to set the water level about 3/4" below the top of the overflow pipe.

  • If the float rubs on other parts, simply adjust the float arm sideways. If the float lacks buoyancy, unscrew then shake it to determine if it is waterlogged. A waterlogged float should be replaced. The float arm can also be replaced, if needed.

  • In tanks using modern plastic refill valves, the tank water level is adjusted in other ways. If your tank uses a hand nut, turn the nut clockwise to raise, or counterclockwise to lower, the water level. Or, your tank may have a sliding pinch clamp on an adjustment rod.

  • Flush valve. Replacements for a flush ball and its actuating mechanism are available, but it may be possible to stop a leak with minor adjustments. Check the following mechanisms before purchasing replacements.

  • See that the guide arm is centered directly over the seat. The guide arm should drop the flush ball directly into its seat. If the flush ball is not seating properly, make the adjustment shown.

  • The guide arm should allow the flush ball to rise enough for a complete flush. If not, raise the arm. Be careful that it isn't too high–then it will prevent the ball from closing completely.

  • Check that the upper lift wire pulls the flush ball high enough. To adjust it, simply bend the wire for a higher or lower lift.

  • The lifting hardware on a flapper-type flush valve should raise the rubber flapper to start a flush, but should not hold the flapper up off its seat. If this is occurring, the hardware is adjusted too short. Some types allow you to slide the flapper itself up or down on the refill tube to ensure that the flapper meets the valve seat squarely. The lifting hardware and flapper height adjustments are the first things to check when flapper problems arise.

  • Refill tube. If the bowl-refill tube is out of place, water is routed directly into the tank, rather than replenishing water in the bowl. When this is the case, you will likely hear splashing sounds during tank refill. The refill tube should aim directly into the overflow pipe but should not reach below water level. If the tube extends too low, it will siphon tank water silently away. Fix it by repositioning as shown.

  • Defective refill tubes on some valves can be replaced with new plastic ones. Simply place one end of the plastic tube over the serrated plastic lug on the body of the valve, and place the plastic holder in the top of the overflow pipe.
  • on Jan 16, 2010 | Drains

    1 Answer

    Toilet tank to bolt repair has make the leak worse


    Rubber goes on the inside. Might be an optional laarge flat washer and nut on the bottom (outside)

    Feb 21, 2010 | Plumb Pak Waste & Overflow Pipe Kit, 1...

    1 Answer

    Eljer garden garden tub drain


    Tub overflows are not required in all states but I highly recommend drilling the hole and installing the proper waste and overflow drain I recommend the Gerber brand and also when you set the tub you need to set it in a light concrete for stability I use great stuff foam for setting tubs 2 cans spray on floor and set and level tub tub will never wobble or move

    Nov 08, 2009 | Drains

    Tip

    Installing a new Toilet - How to install a Toilet


    If you can install your own toilet then you can choose what toilet best suits your needs, as there is a very big variety in style, price, and quality of toilets. Installing your own toilet is not as big a question as you might think it is. Learn how you can install a toilet yourself. You can have your new model toilet in place in just a few hours. Probably even much less time than that.

    The first thing you need to do is pick out the toilet that you prefer to have. If you are older or have health problems, consider a handicap height toilet. They are a couple of inches taller than a standard toilet and make it much easier to get up from. If you have a lot of usage than a pressure assisted toilet might also be a good fit for you. The extra water pressure will help to keep the toilet from clogging. Toilets usually come without a seat, so don't forget to buy a new one or you can save the one from your previous toilet if it will fit the bowl of the new one.

    The floor does not have to be spotless before installing the new toilet, but it should be fairly clean. You will next need to install the tank onto the bowl. Set the bolts with the rubber washers on them in the holes on the tank and then set the tank on the back of the toilet bowl. Tighten the bolts gently, just expanding the washers a bit.

    Next, turn the toilet bowl upside down and place an new wax ring and sleeve onto the toilet horn. The toilet bowl wax gasket works best if it is at room temperature. This will ensure the proper forming of seal. Now stand directly over the toilet and lift it turning it over and setting it down over the bolts in the flange. By doing this you will place the toilet on top of the wax ring. The bolts will come up through the holes on the side of the toilet.
    Install the washers over the bolts and slowly tighten the nuts until snug, while slowly pressing down until the toilet is seated flush with the floor. Make certain that the bolts are tight enough to prevent the toilet from rocking, however do not over-tighten them. Tightening the bolts too much will cause the toilet which is porcelain, to crack. Now, reconnect the water line from the floor to the tank. To give it a nice finished look a bead of silicone caulk can be run around the base of the toilet. Remember that he caulk will be visible, so choose a color that looks good with your toilet for a professional look.

    Installing your own toilet can be just that easy. In an afternoon your can pick out your new toilet, remove your old one, install your new one and have it up and flushing in no time at all! Then last of all, check for leaks!! Don't be embarrassed if you find a leak, retighten and check again. Even a pro will have a leak sometimes. Leaks happen! Good Luck!

    on Dec 06, 2009 | Drains

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