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Dryer goes with 3-4 cycles to dry load of clothes

Have to restart dryer 3-4 time to dry clothes, Feels warm, so getting heat, tumbler is turning, but did notice no air coming out vent in back.

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  • Maytag Master
  • 3,361 Answers

Unplug the dryer.
Open the top lid.
Remove the front panel.
Inspect the blower wheel attached to the motor.
If it moves on the motor shaft replace it.
If iy does not move on the motor shaft, clean the lint out of the exhaust from the blower wheel to the rear of the dryer.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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Kenmore Elite HE4 Gas Dryer Shuts off prematurely in the Auto Dry cycle and the Timed dry cycle


Gas Dryer no heat: or shuts down soon after heating CHECK:

Thermal Fuse
If the air flow in the dryer is restricted, the temperature in the heating chamber can get hot enough to blow the thermal fuse. If the fuse blows, it cuts power to the coils that control the gas valve. The fuse is usually mounted to the exhaust duct just inside the back panel. You can check its continuity with an ohmmeter. If, after disconnecting the fuse, you get any reading other than 0 when you touch the leads of the meter to its terminals, it has blown. There's no way to restore it -- you'll have to install a replacement.

Igniter and Gas Valve Coils
TEST with a multi meter: The igniter is an electric conductor that works like the element in an electric heater, glowing hot enough to ignite gas when you turn on the dryer. This conductor can burn out, and when it does, it may glow, but it won't get hot enough to ignite the gas. At times it may give a reading of continuity yet fail mechanically and not get hot enough to ignite flame though it gets hot and glows and even may show Ohms or continuity ( close circuit) ?
Occasionally, the Gas safety valve and the electric coils that control the gas valve are defective -- they can wear out when the dryer gets old. When this happens, the igniter glows, but gas never enters the heating chamber or does not stay consistant.
Performing a continuity test on either part will help you determine whether or not you need to replace it. But the coils should also be tested for amount of resistance as well as Ohms. As they may be showing ohms yet not putting out enough resistance to keep proper gas pressure flowing. Most coils should show at least 1300 ohms ( GIVE OR TAKE 150 OHMS). Anything significantly less Thus u get an ignition but then it soon goes back out. The flame does not stay lit.

Air Flow and Heat
The motor that drives the tumbler also drives a fan that circulates air through the heating chamber and the tumbler and expels it through the vent. If the air can't circulate, perhaps because of lint blockage, the heating chamber overheats, which prompts the cycling thermostat to turn off the gas. The thermostat resets when the chamber cools, but the chamber heats up quickly and the thermostat again shuts off the gas. The result is that the temperature in the tumbler doesn't stay hot, and your clothes take longer to dry, if they get dry at all.

Warning
There's a big difference between a dryer that doesn't heat up at all and one that just doesn't get hot enough to dry your clothes. In the first instance, the problem is usually a defective part, and things should be back to normal after you replace it. In the second instance, the problem is caused by restricted air flow, and you need to clear the lint filter and vents and take steps to prevent lint build-up. If you don't, you'll use more energy for drying than you need and the dryer may continue to malfunction. Worse, you may have a dryer fire.

Jul 19, 2014 | Kenmore Dryers

Tip

How a Dryer Works


First, you open the door and place your wet clothes into the tumbler. After you shut the door, you adjust the heat settings. Most dryers have three settings-low, medium, and high heat. Next, you set the timer. It's usually a dial-type timer with various settings. You can set the timer for a specific length of time, like 20 or 80 minutes, or you can let the dryer decide when it's time to turn off. Newer dryers have cycle settings like "optimum dry," "less dry," "fluff," and various others. Some have controls for cotton clothes or permanent press, or other options. Also included is a notification switch, that when set on "loud," sounds a buzzer to let you know the dryer's done. After all the settings are set, you press the "start" button.<br />The motor begins to turn and the belt rotates the tumbler. At the same time, air is drawn into the dryer. Also at the same time, the heating coil flares to life (or the pilot light ignites the heater in a gas dryer) and warms the incoming air. The tumbling clothes heat up and the water within them turns to steam. The exhaust carries the steam out of the dryer, usually through a duct that sends it outside. <br />Sounds simple enough, right? But how does the dryer know not to get too hot, and how does the timer actually work? <br />When you open the control panel on the dryer-which is not recommended unless you know what you're doing, by the way-there will be wires going this way and that. The cycle controller is usually square and has a round device attached to the top of it. The round device is actually a small motor. The motor has a small gear on it that connects to a larger one with a dial inside the cycle controller. As the gear on the motor turns, it turns the dial very slowly. The dial usually has a set of four cams attached to it. As the dial turns, the cams engage certain contacts within the cycle controller. The contacts determine everything that happens, from the length of the drying cycle to whether or not the air gets heated.<br />To ensure your clothes don't go up in flames, dryers have temperature sensors installed in them. They are little silver discs, about the size of a quarter, and there are usually two of them. In most dryers, one is located near the heating coil and the other is in the front section of the dryer. They also have a set of contacts within them, so that when the temperature gets too hot, the contacts separate and the dryer automatically turns off.<br />If you take the top and front of the dryer off (again, not recommended), you will see the exposed tumbler. A belt goes around the tumbler and winds around a pulley that's connected to a motor. There are rubber wheels underneath that sit in a groove in the tumbler to ensure an even and smooth rotation. Depending on the dryer you have, the motor may control the exhaust fan as well.<br />One of the most important factors in how a dryer works is air flow. The dryer has to bring in air to heat in order for everything to work. Most dryers have a hole or ventilation duct located on the front of the machine. It's not visible with the cover on. Air is sucked in through that hole and is forced past the heating element. The heated air flows into the tumbler to heat the clothes. The steam is then sucked out of the dryer through the lint trap and out of the building. The lint trap is usually located right below the door of the dryer. For your dryer to work as efficiently as possible, make sure to clean the lint trap after every load. A fan is used to both bring the air in and send it out. It is located between the lint trap and the ductwork leading outside.<br />For all intents and purposes, the dryer is a very simple machine. It is designed so well that the only thing that really changes over the years is the look of them. But just because they're designed well doesn't mean you'll never have a problem with them. If you are currently having a problem with your dryer, check out our easy repair guide before calling in an appliance repairman. The problem may be an easy one to fix, and you could save yourself a bundle.<span><br /></span>

on Dec 24, 2010 | Dryers

2 Answers

Dryer taking to long to dry


Overloading
1. One of the simplest problems to remedy could simply be that you are putting too many items inside the machine during the drying cycle. Avoid overloading your dryer, as this might cause your dryer to work extra hard to dry your clothing, extending the length of the dry cycle.
Wrong Heat Setting
2. A common issue with clothes dryers could be the wrong heat setting. Most home dryers feature several settings, from low heat settings to high heat and permanent press. Be sure the setting you choose is right for your needs. Another setting to check is the load size of your dryer. If you are drying a large amount of clothes, be sure the setting for large loads on high heat is selected. Choosing the wrong heat setting or load size can cause your clothes and linens to take longer to dry.
Lint Trap
3. One of the simplest fixes for drying issues might just be that your lint trap is clogged. Each time you use your dryer, lint will form in the trap. If the lint trap and vents are full, this could block air going into your dryer and slow down if not completely stop the drying process. After you use your dryer, remove this lint trap and empty it fully. Even if the lint trap is full, your other dryer vents might be clogged as well.
Clogged Vents
4. If your clothes are in the dryer for a long amount of time, but still not drying, the reason for this could be a clogged vent. A sign that your vent is clogged is if your clothes are warm or hot to the touch after sitting in the dryer, but still damp. To unclog your dryer vent, you may need professional assistance. This is especially necessary if your dryer vent leading out of the house is particularly long.
Heat Source
5. If the dryer is not getting enough heat to dry your clothes,something could be wrong with the heating system. After the drying cycle, touch your clothes to see if they are warm. If not, this means that the heating mechanism is malfunctioning. It will need to be repaired or replaced by a professional.

Feb 28, 2011 | GE Profile Harmony DPGT750GC Gas Dryer

1 Answer

Dry take hours to dry


need to check hi limit thermostat on element make sure it is not cycling to soon

Apr 13, 2010 | Kenmore Elite HE4 Electric Dryer

2 Answers

2 to 3 cycles to fully dry clothes


if the clothes are warm after the cycle then you need to make sure the vent to the outside of the house is not plugged if they are not warm then it is in the heating circuit of the dryer wether it be the element or a fuse will have to be tested. to dry clothes it takes heat and air flow if you dont have one of the two they will not dry correctly

May 18, 2009 | Kenmore Elite Oasis 6808 Electric Dryer

2 Answers

Kenmore Elite dryer heats but does not dry


Make sure that your vent tube is not kinked or crushed behind the dryer and it all this is ok then you need to change your cycling thermostat. is it gas or electric

Mar 12, 2009 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer takes 3 times to dry


My tumbler won't turn on my front load Kenmore dryer

Mar 07, 2009 | GE Dryers

1 Answer

Gas dryer runs, cleaned hose, get warm does not heat up to dry


with a gas dryer in which your assured te hventing is free and clear of any obstructions, i would look to replace the coil pack located atop the gas valve itself, probably about $25 part number 279834... 2 coils simply mount atop the valvle

Feb 11, 2009 | Whirlpool Dryers

2 Answers

Dryer does not get hot enough to dry clothes Roper REX4634KQ1 Electric Dryer


Most common cause of this is a clogged venting going to the outside to test this remove the vent from the back of the dryer and run a load if it drys ok them you know you have a venting issue and will need to be cleaned out if not plz repost and we can look deeper into it

Jul 15, 2008 | Roper REX4634KQ Electric Dryer

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