Question about Technics Audio & Video Receivers

8 Answers

My sl1200 turntable seems to be putting out static i can hear the stylus play but no musik coming through the rcas???

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  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    ??? what do you mean could be cut? when deck is plugged into mixer even when off. produces noise from speakers from that channel. tried different channels???

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    where is that and how do i clen it?

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    turntable is in phono earth is grounded, static gets loader when you touch the turntable anywhere, and still does it when power is off to turntable??

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    the noise is there with no record doesnt even need to be on???

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    it was fine till the other day set up exactly the same. the ground is connected to ground on back of the mixer? needle is approx 6 months old. i can swap turntables and does the same in the other channel where my good turntable is fine in both????

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    ?? do you mean check rcas where they connect to turntable??

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    does it sound strange for that to just happen. it was fine?

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    did u say the ic is approx $3 where do i find one

  • niknpaul Mar 12, 2009

    rca wires are fixed to the turntable??

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8 Answers

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Hi check these if any suits to u  Problem: No audio output, audio cuts in and out or only audio from one side.

Possible Cause 1: Dirty stylus, worn or faulty stylus or cartridge. Solution: Try cleaning stylus tip with a stylus cleaner (such as Stanton's SC4). See link.

Isolate and replace the defective stylus or cartridge.

Possible Cause 2: Loose cartridge or headshell connections. Solution: Check cartridge connections to headshell wires, making sure that the colored wires don't have any breaks and are connected to the respective cartridge pins.

Possible Cause 3: Oxidation or dirt build up on 4 pins in the toneam that make contact to the headshell. Solution: Clean the 4 pins using a pencil head eraser and then with some rubbing alcohol on a Q-tip

Problem: Digital output not working.

Possible Cause 1: Incorrect output connections. Solution: Make sure to connect the turntable's SPDIF digital output to a computer sound card or stand alone CD recorder that has the same single SPDIF or coaxial input.

Possible Cause 2: Digital recorder or sound card spec don't match. Solution: Make sure the recorder or sound card specs match the specs of the turntable's digital output: 44.1kHz sampling rate, 16 bit word size, PCM format.

Possible Cause 3: Wrong digital cable used. Solution: Only use a SPDIF or coaxial type digital cable with a 75ohm load.

Problem: Cartridge skipping.

Possible Cause 1: Incorrect tonearm and cartridge setup. Solution: Properly setup tonearm and cartridge settings as specified in turntable owners manual or cartridge setup instructions. See link.

Possible Cause 2: Worn out or damaged stylus. Solution:Replace the defective stylus with a new one.

Possible Cause 3: Dirty, worn or scratched records. Solution: Clean records using a vinyl cleaner (such as Stanton's VC1). See link.

Use records with little or no wear or scratches.

Possible Cause 4: Turntable not level. Solution: Make sure turntable is placed on a sturdy and flat level surface.

Problem: Audio feedback.

Possible Cause: Turntable to close to speakers.

Solution: Face speakers away from turntable or move turntable away from speakers signal wave path.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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Its the problem of amplifier ic in the turntable that is actually fried up.that controls the sound variations which passess through the speakers. the ic number IC563JI  has to be replaced from the amplifier board which is in the unit.and new $3 IC  has to be replaced.this will solve the problem.try to do manually onlky if you are familiar with soldering iron and multimeters other wise its a repair person job.any ways the cost will be negligible.and its worth reparing.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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Hi and welcome to FixYa,

Always, a turntable has an additional ground wire that connects to the chassis of the amp/receiver. This is aside from the regular RCA shielded wire.

Offhand, your post 'static gets loader when you touch the turntable anywhere' is very significant. This indicates that the braid part of the shielded wire as well as the ground wire is not doing its function. This could mean that they are cut or disconnected. Solution would be to check/replace the ground wire as well as the shielded wire with the RCA plugs.

Good luck and thank you for using FixYa.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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  • 435 Answers

Try different are new RCA cables.
If its still doesnt work, Check if the RCA sockets are internally disconnected inside the receiver.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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  • 320 Answers

When you say static, I take this to mean the stylus is picking up a lot of dust & producing some nice rice krispies sounds?
Earthing the deck normally only reduces noise & electrical hum. A carbon fibre brush is good for removing dust & static from a record.If your stylus is staticaly charged try cleaning the tip with some appropriate stylus cleaner or even play or place the stylus on a damp record for a few mins may help it discharge.


Try removing the earth connection from the amp & see what happens.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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It seems the volume control potentiometer needs cleaning .


Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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Make sure your going into a PHONO input on a reciever. If your using a regular rca stereo input it won't work. It has to be PHONO. Then make sure that the turntable is grounded to the reciever or mixer. To do this locate the grounding screw on the turntable and locate the ground on your reciever. If your still having issues and your doing all of this please let me know and I will assist you further. Please take a moment to accept and rate my solution accordingly.
Thank you,
Lee

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

  • 2 more comments 
  • Lee A.
    Lee A. Mar 12, 2009

    Usually if you can hear static it means your either not using a phono input or your not grounded. one or the other. If both those fail then you need to check the connection on your stylus. I think you have enough to go on I look forward to hearing back from you and will greatly appreciate a positive rating.
    Thanks again,
    Lee


  • Lee A.
    Lee A. Mar 12, 2009

    If it is doing it when it is off, then it is not properly grounded and that is what your hearing. How old is your needle? Also how do you know that your ground is actually grounded?
    Thank you,
    Lee


  • Lee A.
    Lee A. Mar 12, 2009

    Have you tried a different receiver/stereo, the phono input could be bad on your stereo. Basically you will want to go down the list of things that it can be and use process of elimination as that is the only way you will find what the problem is. I really hope you have found this helpful and will reconsider and accept and give a helpful rating. If you need further assistance I will be more then happy to.
    Thanks again,
    Lee


  • Lee A.
    Lee A. Mar 12, 2009

    Have you tried a different set of RCA wires? Also by what you have previously posted. I assume the ground wire is good and properly connected.
    Thanks,
    Lee


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  • 583 Answers

Check out the connections it might be cut in between.

Posted on Mar 12, 2009

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1 Answer

I have vestax 05pro2. Left channel works but out of one speaker. The turntable input is good. Im thinking Its either the channel fader, or the rca inputs for that side. Has anyone had this problem?


Hi,
Here's a solution to see if you have a problem with either your receiver or turntable.
The turntable has 2 RCA's one red for right channel, and one white or black for left channel, which plug into the back of the amplifier.

  • Unplug both RCA from rear of amplifier.
  • Plug in a cd or dvd player into those inputs on the amplifier, the sound will be lower but it will give you an indication if the amplifier is ok or not.
  • If you have sound on both channels left and right then the amplifier is good
  • If you still only have sound on left channel, then there is a problem with the right channel input on the amp.
  • If your amp, is good, unplug the cd /dvd player.
  • Put a record on and start playing the record
  • Plug the white or black RCA from the turntable into the rear of the amplifier marked left, you should have sound.
  • now unplug it from the left and plug in into the right red RCA socket, if you have sound the amplifier is working fine.
  • if there is no sound there may be a problem with the stylus cartridge on the turntable
  • now lets reverse the test
  • unplug both RCA from amp.
  • Plug the red RCA into the left socket on amplifier, if there is sound, turntable is working fine, if no sound there is a problem with either the stylus cartridge or that red RCA cable.
  • now unplug the red RCA from the left side and plug it into the right side socket
  • if there is no sound there may be a problem with the stylus cartridge or RCA cable.
I hope this helps

MobileJB

Jul 15, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

I have purchased two ARK IV white elliptical Stylus replacement needles for my turntable and I am not getting the life out of these items, despite very limited play time. Seems like they just wear down...


What's the turntable? Skipping across the record would be a (mal)function of tracking and anti-skating. The recommended tracking force for this stylus os 3.0 grams. I've been out of the vinyl groove for some years now but I remember my Shure M95 tracking in the range of 1-1.5 g. Railroad spikes track at 3.0. Is this for 'scratching' or whatever it is they call that noise?

Apr 27, 2011 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

45 and 33 sound slow


Here's a procedure for setting the tonearm...

Look up the recommended tracking force for your cartridge/stylus.

Unplug the power to the turntable and place it on a perfectly level surface.

Set the Tracking Force and AntiSkating to 0.
Using the tonearm elevation control, raise the tonearm.
Manually move the tonearm in toward the platter.
Manually rotate the platter Clockwise a few turns to disengage any cueing mechanisms.
Disengage the tonearm elevation control. The tonearm will either float or drop. This is why we have no power, just in case it hits the platter.
Adjust the counterweight until the tonearm floats exactly horizontal. Use the flat portion of the tonarm rest as a gauge.
Return the tonearm to its rest.
If you don't have a Stylus Tracking Force Gauge. Dial in the prescribed tracking force and a corresponding anti-skate reading. Play records.

May 04, 2009 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Turntable stylus not staying on record


Since there are no tonearm adjustments the only solution in the manual that comes close is to make sure the turntable is level. The other possibility is the no-brainer of checking the stylus cover is NOT rotated down, preventing the stylus from contacting the record.

A quick and dirty test of tonearm balance being too light would be to unplug the power and manually move the tonearm over the platter. Gently lower it to see if it floats in the air or lightly but firmly contacts the platter. That won't tell you if it is tracking properly but it might indicate or eliminate tracking force as the culprit.

Apr 26, 2009 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Sony PS-LX200H turntable plugged in to Onkyo TX-8211 inputs


After a few years it may be time to consider a new cartridge for the turntable. The current one may have given up the ghost. You might also want to check that the output cables from the turntable to the receiver are firmly plugged in. They may have come loose if someone was moving things or cleaning. Yet another thing to consider is the input on the receiver may not be working. You can test this by plugging in a cable with RCA plugs on both ends and touching the pins on the unconnected end. If the input's okay you'll hear a hum.

Probably it's time for a new cartridge. They don't last forever, especially if you, like me, are someone who still plays a lot of old vinyl!

Please take a moment to rate this solution a fixya if it's helped get you going, and thanks for asking here!

Mar 12, 2009 | Onkyo TX-8511 Receiver

2 Answers

I just hooked up my old amplifier to my turntable and started playing some vinyl. I'm getting an incredibly annoying static sound through the headphones I'm listening through, and I'm positive it's not the...


Make sure the ground wire from the turntable (they all have one) is grounded to the amp, also the turntable has to be connected to the phono input on the amp. Turntable cant connect to cd or aux. Only phono. Also check to see if there is dust and dirt built up on the needle. clean if needed. most likely a grounding issue

Dec 05, 2008 | Audio & Video Receivers

1 Answer

Turntable problem


It could be a couple of different things.

Do you get any sound, even very faint, if volume is turned up all the way?

If so, you probably have the turntable connected to the wrong type of input or you have the wrong type of turntable for the type of input you have on the receiver.

Older turntables have a very, very low level of audio output which requires an input that has much more gain than the normal type of audio input on a receiver.

Many newer turntables and receivers has the same level phono inputs and outputs as the other inputs and outputs of the receiver like the CD or Tape I/O. When an older turntable with such a low level output is connected to this type of phono input the sound is so low you can only hear it very faintly with the volume all the way up.

If you have the proper type of turntable for the type of input on your receiver, then the problem is most likely in the turntable. To check if it is or not, disconnect the turntable from the receiver, and then connect an RCA cable to the receivers phono input with nothing connected to the other end. Then with the volume turned up just about 1/4 to 1/2 the way up, touch the ends of the male ends of the RCA cable that are not connected to anything with your finger lightly tapping it a few times. You should be able to hear the tapping sound real easy in the speakers. If you hear that noise you know that the receiver is OK. If you don't hear anything the receiver has a pre-amp problem or the receiver is not set to the proper function.

If you determain the receiver is working normal, you have a problem in the turntable. Most times it is the stylus or the wires connected to the cartridge which holds the stylus.

Another thing to check is that if your turntable has a ground wire coming off the back of it near the RCA outputs of it, make sure that it is connected to the chassis of the receiver. Most receivers have a ground terminal right on the back that you can loosen with your fingers and then put the ground wire from the turntable in there and tighten it hand tight. If it has no ground terminal on the receiver you can always just loosen a screw on the back and connect it there. Make sure the ground wire has the insulation cut back to expose the bare metal, that insures that you have continuity from the ground of the turntable to the ground of the receiver.

If your turntable has no ground wire, then you have a newer turntable type that would be able to plug into any of the audio inputs on the back of the receiver. It would be a turntable with a boosted signal that can only be connected to an input with the same level as the CD or Tape input.

I hope this helps you to figure out what your problem is, if you need more help don't hesitate to reply to this post. I will get back to you as soon as I am able.

If this was helpful for you a "FixYa!" rating would be appropriate and very much appreciated, after all, it is the only reward we get for helping people like yourself for free.

Thanks,

Dave


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See: http://djparts.net/technics-parts-replacement-dustcover-with-hinges.html

Has a dustcover w/hinges... :o)

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Karen - Is it only the FM section that is giging you trouble? Does Stereo work for the other inputs - VCR/DVD/Turntable?
Is that stereo button ONLY for the FM section?

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