Question about Fuji FinePix F10 Digital Camera

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Lens cover issue

My daughter dropped my camera. The zoom jammed. I was able to unjam it but I cannot figure out which way to put the little springs back in to make the lens cover close correctly. Please help me.

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Re: lens cover issue

Check the Fuji Web site - but I fear it will be new camera time when you see the repair price

Posted on Aug 03, 2007

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Zoom error showing on display screen of my daughters fuji finepix f40fd digital camera. Unable to press button to take photos and when I try to turn camera off the zoom lens goes in and out twice before...

The lens Is trying to close properly but the focus mechanism has a problem, most likely jammed, so the lens cannot correctly close or work properly.
It will need to be opened up and reset.
Please email me. My email address is listed in my tips section on my profile.

Aug 28, 2009 | Fuji FinePix F40fd Digital Camera

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I dropped my olympus 540 zoom camera and lens cover is jammed

The problem you are describing is a problem with a sensor in the lens assembly of the camera. It seems to have failed and needs to be replaced. Following are the instructions to send your camera to Olympus for service.

Olympus will charge a flat rate repair fee for this product if beyond the one year factory warranty or the warranty is voided. The cost is $73 plus your local sales tax. This covers parts and labor, factory cleaning and diagnostic check, 6 month warranty and the cost of shipping the product back to you is all included in that price.

May 18, 2009 | Olympus SP-350 Digital Camera

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I have a lens issue (possibly jammed from lens cleaner i used?)

A nice lens brush is what you clean a lens with.
Solvents in the spray you used could have done a couple of bad things.
1. Carried muck into the zoom mechanism.
2. Melted/dissolved part of the zoom mechanism.

Either way, unless you are brave and capable enough to dismantle it, it needs to go back to service for a clean out/re-jig.

Sorry for the news,

Mar 20, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare DX7590 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Dropped camera jammed zoom lens on nikon 28-85 lens

You have impact damage, the gears in the lens are out of alignment.

he is a friend of mine who can fix this for you.

Jan 08, 2009 | Nikon Coolpix S210 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Opening and closing 3 times and then saying turn off and then back on

So 2 weeks ago my Sony DSC-W80 stopped working. Our friends dog ran into the camera (in my girlfriends hand) full speed. It started opening and closing a few times, and then giving the "turn the camera off and back on" message. I read about tapping around the lens, etc. None of this worked.

I took off the camera body and carefully examined the interior of the camera. Turning in on and watching closely, I discovered the problem. Looking at the camera from the front, I saw a slider on the top right side of the lens that appeared to be jammed. I then saw a spring that was attached to the slider and free on the other end. Apparently when the dog rammed the camera, the other mount for the spring broke off (they are very fragile). The purpose of the slider is to adjust the viewfinder based on the zoom range of the lens. I simply removed the slider which had jammed when the spring came loose. Camera works flawlessly now. The only issue is that the viewfinder doesn't zoom, but who uses the viewfinder anymore anyway? Oh, and I have a screw leftover. What project isn't complete without having extra parts when you are done?

Hope this can help someone else!

Sep 29, 2008 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W80 Digital Camera

4 Answers


I had a problem where the camera (Optio A20) would power up, the startup screen would flash on, the lens would come out, then about 3 seconds later it would go back in and the camera would shut down. Figuring that it'd be too expensive to get it fixed, I went at it with a suitably small screwdriver. It turned out to be a jammed piece of the lens mechanism, that was surprisingly accessible.

I did the following:
1. Remove the battery. Remove the casing (4 x screws by the power/data sockets, 5 on the bottom. The side panel (nearest the lens) should then come off with a little persuasion, revealing another screw which is holding the top panel on. Remove this with a little more persuasion.

2. At this point you should be able to pry the casing open from the base of the camera and remove it (You can open it more carefully, but I didn't damage my case by prying it). Don't be too rough though. A loose plate may fall out, that you'll need to replace when reconstructing the casing. Don't forget the position of this as it's quite important in holding everything together! There should be a little pad on it though, and this goes face down, nearest the lens.

3. Now you've got the case off, look at the base of the camera, next to where the battery slides in. There should be a little metal plate that's kind of clipped on, with a little peg nearest the lens. This is covering part of the lens mechanism, and in my case, this is where the problem was occuring.

There's a big orange bit of circuitry under the screen (you'll see it if the screen falls out - don't worry if it does by the way, so long as it's connected and hasn't been damaged it's fine. Just make sure you're nice and gentle with it). Anyway, this circuitry drops into a slot on the base, right next to the very fragile spring that you don't need to touch. On my camera this was loose and I think that this was part of the problem. Powering up the camera without it in place caused all kinds of problems. Anyway, I ensured that this was in place, and near to the fragile spring I mentioned earlier, there's a metal pin, with a piece of black plastic on it. You might not see it, but it's also attached to the fragile spring. If you get a small flat thing (a screwdriver is ideal - a really small one) and just give it a nudge, then power it on, the mechanism should unjam (which solved my problem). Note that I've put the battery back in a couple of times here to make sure that the problem is solved. Don't worry - so long as you're not touching any electronic bits, you should be fine.

Putting the case back together was a doddle too, so long as you've put your screws in an organised line, so you know what goes where...

Good luck!

Jan 03, 2008 | Pentax Optio A20 Digital Camera

2 Answers


If the lens is jammed in the out position you can try holding the camera firmly and tapping/hitting it against your hand with the camera on. The lens should then retract. If this doesn't work or if you are afraid of dropping it (do it on your bed, that way it doesn't hit the floor if you _do_ drop it), you can drop it on a wood/firm surface from an inch or so up and it should retract the lens. This solution ONLY WORKS IF THE LENS IS JAMMED.

Sep 30, 2007 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX8 Digital Camera

10 Answers

'Turn camera off and turn back on' message


I was heartbroken to learn that my Lumix DMC-TZ1, which I purchased 2-3 years ago, had died -- right during my daughter's dance recital, for seemingly no reason. Tonight I was surfing the web researching replacement cameras (many brands), and I realize that I feel like there is no real "history" on the camera that's any worse than any other camera on the market, including the Canon Powershots, which are all the rage right now. So I started researching on the Fixit site other cameras for possible problems.

What I found is that all the cameras have funky messages (Sony and Canon included!) that result when he camera has been dropped or the lense has somehow been altered. So I read all the different "solutions" and then came up with my own:

I decided that the lense needed to be un-jammed. At this point, if the camera was useless to me, I might as well take a chance and try to unjam it. So I did!

I held the camera about 3-4 inches from a table top. Then I simulated a "drop" (without the case) that was gentle enough that it wouldn't smash the LCD but that would maybe make the lense unjam. (Note: I couldn't SEE any problem with the lense; this was just a hypothesis I couldn't go wrong trying.)

Each time I put the camera on, tried to modify the zoom (a function which normally makes me get the error message forcing me to turn the camera off), and then got the message. BUT the 3rd or 4th time: TA DAH! NO MESSAGE! INSTEAD, A SHOCKER: I WAS ABLE TO MODIFY THE ZOOM! AND THEN I TOOK A PICTURE! AND VIDEO!!!!

So my camera is back! And I also have discovered that the flash problem I had started to have previously has now seemed to have gone away also.

My advice is to just TRY! You have nothing to lose: try "dropping it" back into shape! I know it sounds crazy -- but I just saved at least $200 by doing this!

Mama Maria in Burke VA

Sep 17, 2007 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ1 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Lens shutter stuck

If you're careful this problem is a relatively easy fix for many digital cameras. The design of the lens cover mechanism is usually simple and very similar throughout camera brands. Here's an example fix for a Canon A400 with similar problems:

Jan 24, 2007 | Fuji FinePix A340 Digital Camera

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